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Can I offer accounting services if I am not qualified yet?

Hi All,

I have a degree and MSc supported with a few years accounting experience. I am about to go for a professional qualification (have not decided which one). Last few months I was helping friends with their accounts and tax. Recently I was asked to do it for other people. My question is: Can I offer accounting services? Can I register with HMRC, get an insurance, and offer accounting services without being registered with any of the professional bodies?

Thank you,



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27th Mar 2012 11:40

Yes and no

Anyone can call themselves an accountant and offer tax and accountancy services.

To my knowledge, none of the professional bodies will allow you to do this however whilst you are studying.

You will need to get a job in accountancy, buiold your esperiance and then obtain a practicing certificate if you want to practice as a qualified accountant.




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27th Mar 2012 11:50

It's one of them funny things

When I left uni at 22 I could have started my own practice.  Now I'm 30 and ACCA to boot, I'm no longer allowed to practice, as the ACCA insist I obtain a practising certificate.


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By rjh1983
27th Mar 2012 12:05


Become qualified in either AAT or ATT (or both) and get a practising certificate from either.  First though you would need to demonstrate that you are competent and have at least 12 months practical experience in each of the services you wish to provide.  These qualifications are fine if your clients are small businesses and non-audit as you can't audit without being chartered.


Good luck in whatever route you take.

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27th Mar 2012 14:29

Could TB not just go with the

Could TB not just stick with the degree and MSc, register with HMRC for ML......and off you go (obviously only for small businesses and non-audit, and not being a student with ACCA etc)?

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28th Mar 2012 06:23

CIMA will allow you to practice if you are a student, them seem friendlier than ACCA and ICAEW.

Most clients don't care.

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