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EU referendum poll

The EU referendum vote is fast approaching. As Politicians and businesses pick their side, AccountingWEB is keen to track how our members are feeling about the vote.

To let us know how you’re currently voting, we have set up a poll.

So, which way are you voting? 

Are you in, out, or still unsure?

Replies

Please login or register to join the discussion.

Out

Given that I have lived under EU rule for what seems like a large part of my life, I'm going to cease the opportunity to vote out of this expensive dictatorship. 

Thanks (1)
26th Feb 2016 17:58

Be warned - this is NOT a secret ballot (your username & vote is visible to other AWEB users)!

RM

Thanks (1)

Polling curtain open

runningmate wrote:

Be warned - this is NOT a secret ballot (your username & vote is visible to other AWEB users)!

RM

Ah, yes. Thanks for spotting that glitch, RM.

I'll reiterate: the polling curtain is open. Nothing is secret about this vote.

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Good spot, RM

Doesn't affect me, but bad form for those that use their real names.

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26th Feb 2016 18:03

It's hardly a secret

... for the more vocal members. :)

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So...

Are you in or out, Shirley?

I've not noticed your political persuasion. Honest.

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IN

 

For 3 reasons:

1. It provides some "drag" to which ever 5 year downing street dictatorship we have in power to pursue extreme policies. In particular it protects enviromental, health and social policies which the big business who fund political parties and influence policy tend to attack

2. The risk of widespread damage to trade and in particular the city of London is significant at a weak time for the economy, also the lack of a cheap labour supply is going to affect many businesses, especially delivery, construction and farming. 

3. Freedom of movement I think is a quite brilliant thing myself, and I would be very sad to see the end of it. 

Connected to which am really quite worried about the fate of both our "brits abroad" and also families in the UK from overseas who will have their whole lives turned upside down if we come out.  There is one thing being here to work for a year or two and being sent back on exit a bit earlier than you had thought, quite different once you start falling in love and settling down, especially when its cross-community. There will be a lot of messy situations and sadness. 

 

 

 

Thanks (8)

Given the hype, uncertainty and fear mongering..

on both sides, and that I doubt either choice will make any difference to the main ills of the world, I'd normally toss a Euro, however given the anti-them, wall building constituent within the Out lot, I'm In.

Thanks (6)
26th Feb 2016 19:10

Shake it all about

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26th Feb 2016 19:13

p.s. I note that the results shown do not match the votes cast. Is the poll organised by FIFA?

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By Glennzy
27th Feb 2016 00:53

It's all I know but I can see both sides of coin.
The things that matter to me are, will it make German cars more expensive if so I will have to change mine before we exit.

Will we still be allowed in the champions league and Euro championship.

What will it do to travel costs to Eu?

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27th Feb 2016 06:45

In favour of democracy

So it's got to be OUT.

European Union has to be the most undemocratic institution in Europe.

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27th Feb 2016 09:09

OUT
At its core, The EU is a fundamentally corporatist, centralising and deeply pork barrel loving and anti-democratic institution. It loves sound bites and political correctness but they are skin- deep only and, to remain in the EU, is the road to mediocrity, dumbing down and the loss of national identity as an increasingly peripheral player in what wants to be a protectionist bloc putting up barriers to the rest of the world.

Even if you don't agree with me on that, and it is only one man's opinion, the yes vote should agree that we have managed to get ourselves into a position now where voting to remain isn't going to make the mandarins at EU Central breathe a huge sigh of relief and say "fair cop, chaps, we'll lay off the Big Brother stuff from now on," but is much more likely to result in their mistaking inches and country miles in the past becoming kid's stuff compared to the liberties they'll take in the future safe in the knowledge we voted yes and no further referendum is likely due to the political damage it causes at home.

It's also interesting to see that vote is heavily in favour of the noes (60:30 at time of writing) which is similar to the same thread on my favourite football forum, yet the papers / news organisations are saying it's too tight to call. Are they just towing the chattering classes line or will we the voters get nervous as polling day approaches and vote for the devil we know?

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By 3569787
03rd May 2016 15:53

OUT OUT OUT

.

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27th Feb 2016 10:54

who is

Who is going to be the silent majority this time.    Their are a lot I know that will vote but have switched off to the no and yes side and already do not like the tone of the debate.   I will decide on the day like I have done for other referendums.  I have not decided but I will be voting.

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27th Feb 2016 10:55

OUT Why would anybody not vote for freedom

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By Ruddles
27th Feb 2016 11:50

Same outcome

I suspect that we'll end up with the same situation as the Scottish indy ref. I get the feeling that No won by a small majority not because there was an active desire to stay part of the UK but, with nothing but scaremongering from both camps - without any clear explanation of how things would work in independence (particualrly lacking from the Yes camp) people, especially the undecideds, ended up plumping for the status quo.

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27th Feb 2016 11:59

Be Careful what you wish for . . .
Uncertanty in the global markets and general turmoil will affect the value of your pension scheme. The lack of confidence may not be temporary.Trading goods in the eurozone is logistically, the most green form of trading that one can do.The eurozone is at least regulated (yes by some who are regrded as incompetent). In many parts of the world no such protection can be relied on, or even questioned.There has been Peace in the eurozone for many decades.Negotiating as a powerful member on the top table, but with our own currency, and separated geographically, is a very privileged place to be.Obama (Harvard Business graduate) apart from all his other achievements, has already said that leaving could be a poor decision.

As Sarah has wisely said, casting one's vote will need to be a very well considered process, and offering the vote to all the electorate in referendum was very dangerous. The tone of the debate has become unpleasant, and the emotional lobbying is entirely spurious to a measured decision process. 

Thanks (1)
27th Feb 2016 12:05

Don't believe this rubbish

DSP Financial Management wrote:

Uncertanty in the global markets and general turmoil will affect the value of your pension scheme. The lack of confidence may not be temporary.Trading goods in the eurozone is logistically, the most green form of trading that one can do.The eurozone is at least regulated (yes by some who are regrded as incompetent). In many parts of the world no such protection can be relied on, or even questioned.There has been Peace in the eurozone for many decades.Negotiating as a powerful member on the top table, but with our own currency, and separated geographically, is a very privileged place to be.Obama (Harvard Business graduate) apart from all his other achievements, has already said that leaving could be a poor decision.

As Sarah has wisely said, casting one's vote will need to be a very well considered process, and offering the vote to all the electorate in referendum was very dangerous. The tone of the debate has become unpleasant, and the emotional lobbying is entirely spurious to a measured decision process. 

The UK is outside of the eurozone.

Obama studied law at Harvard.

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27th Feb 2016 12:25

Enjoy your confidence.

petersaxton wrote:

Obama studied law at Harvard.

Thank you for the correction.

You've clearly made up your mind. Many of us are not so certain.

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27th Feb 2016 12:29

Decision making

DSP Financial Management wrote:

petersaxton wrote:

Obama studied law at Harvard.

Thank you for the correction.

You've clearly made up your mind. Many of us are not so certain.

Yes, I have made up my mind. I considered the facts and decided. What is there to be uncertain about?

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27th Feb 2016 12:09

I can only speak for myself

I have done a vast amount of research, both for staying in and leaving. The future will always be uncertain, but when you look at the history (from both sides) and check out the facts, it becomes pretty clear who is telling lies and distorting the truth.

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27th Feb 2016 12:20

Socialism

is alive and kicking in the Eurozone, with France a basket case of left wing attitudes and bureaucracy of incredible proportions. Germany is also inherently socialist but are so efficient that they can pay for their public sector. Greece is Greece and should never have joined the club. Spain, Portugal and Italy have also lived in la-la land for years and are now paying the price with austerity and high unemployment.

The last general election was unique in that the incumbent party actually increased its majority. It was effectively a rejection of loonie left wing socialist (spend other people's money) politics. 

I believe the referendum will depend upon people's instincts because the truth is nobody knows the effect of a No vote. What we do know is that nobody will die as a result of the referendum.

 

 

 

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27th Feb 2016 13:18

its clear the the Brussel SprOUTs
Are mainly white older men

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27th Feb 2016 13:38

16yo

carnmores wrote:
Are mainly white older men

 

Rather like the 16 yo girl on QT ??

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27th Feb 2016 14:07

Remain


We were one of the 200 businesses who signed the letter in the Times.  Lots of personal reasons for this, EU funding paid for part of my degree, lots of international clients and EU team members and my brother has moved round Europe working and currently lives in Czech Republic.

There are so many uncertainties with the Leave route.  We don't know what sort of trade agreement we will be able to agree with the rest of the EU if we leave.  I can't imagine the EU (who we will have just snubbed) giving us much more than we have got already.  If we want to be able to move freely around the EU, we'll need to give rights to EU nationals to come here.  The word immigration is being used too broadly across the media with little distinction between refugees and asylum seekers (who I think we will still help),  EU migrants and those from elsewhere.  We have an attractive economy , of course people want to come here, but I have to say all the EU migrants I know here are working very hard and paying taxes.  

I think it is going to be a tough result to call.  There are a few people prepared to stand up nd shout at both ends of the spectrum but there are many more in the middle who have no idea which way to jump.  Our local MP seems to be sitting on the fence still.  You'd think she'd have access to some sensible data to make a decision based on compared to Joe Public.

It's a shame 16/17 year olds won't get a vote, it'll have an impact on them more than a lot of pensioners.

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27th Feb 2016 15:16

why cant you read i said
'mainly' - of course there are young people who want to leave , all polls support the contention that the young favour staying in.

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Carnmores
What does the colour of anyone's skin matter in this referendum?

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@carnmores

Hardly - even though I haven't spoken to many/any people (who like me voted last time) who want to stay in. We have heard it all before and seen how the intentions have been corrupted.

but statistically I am guessing more of us should be female than male as we get older.

I can see no relevance for the colour part of the comment.

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27th Feb 2016 21:36

out

 

 1. I suspect the country will be around 11 billion a year better off 

 2. Less stress on our health and education services

 3. we will be able to make our own decisions.Do we really need any help from France and Germany?

 4. I am not against people coming to the UK however we should have a points based system like many  other countries.

 

I do not think trade will be effected in the long term after all the other European countries are going to want to sell to us, so to achieve a happy medium exports to Europe will not change.

 

I am not that bothered about the free movement throughout Europe and again i suspect it would not be that difficult even if we pulled out.

 

Thanks (4)
By Locutus
27th Feb 2016 23:39

Probably leave
Primarily because: -

1. The EU is remote and undemocratic. The real power is the unelected European Commission and its army of thousands of bureaucrats, which cannot be voted out;

2. The fundamental aim of the EU is "ever closer union" - increasingly interfering in the lives of its citizens at the expense of their elected governments. This is a concept many (possibly most) of its citizens do not share;

3. It is fundamentally bureaucratic and wasteful. Whether it be shuttling bureaucrats between two needless HQs in Brussels and Strasbourg or even more so in giving subsidies to French and other developed EU farmers, instead of letting the farmers in the third world compete on an equal basis to bring themselves out of poverty;

4. It is resistant to change, even when evidence suggests things are going wrong. The Euro is the wrong currency for Greece and probably others, yet for ideological reasons the Euro is considered forever and cannot be changed. Real change on anything important is impossible, which is why Cameron's renegotiation achieved virtually nothing.

Saying that, I think there are some positives with the EU. The ability to travel and work in different member states is good. I know some are concerned at the level of immigration, but the fact is we do need a certain amount of immigration to function effectively. If an EU citizen wants to work honestly in the UK, I have no problem with that. We just need to ability to manage the inflow a bit better, evict wrongdoers and only give benefits to those EU citizens that have "put something in" first.

I am also broadly supportive of what they have done to improve the environment and the help it has given Eastern Europe recover from the destruction that Communism caused to their societies. Both of which will help us all.

I've been actively researching both sides, but have been struggling to find any compelling reasons to remain. There have been various scare stories from the remain side, but none that I have found particularly convincing.

If the UK leaves the EU, there will still be trade between the two, whether it be on an EEA basis (such as Norway), EFTA basis (such as Switzerland), a customs union (such as Turkey), or with no free trade agreement (such as the United States, China, Japan and most of the world). EEA and EFTA also allow the free movement of citizens to / from the EU.

The result will be extremely tight. Although remain has the incumbent advantage of being the "safe" option, everyone that I have ever met who has a strong opinion is ALWAYS leave. Also, remain is strong amongst the young - a demographic that tend to vote less than the older generation.

Thanks (9)
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28th Feb 2016 11:06

Does anyone think that the EU won't strike a good trade deal with the UK if we say NO when considering the massive trade they do with us - particularly Germany.The real uncertainty is what the EU is becoming with the massive influx of refugees and economic migrants, who will drive up the unemployment levels and the economies down

Also the future problems created by giving Turkey £billions to reduce the current immigrant levels (which it is failing to do ) and in return allowing their citizens visa free travel in Europe. This is before they join in the future with the full rights of a member state

I believe in the Groucho Marx saying -" I wouldn't want to belong to a club that has me as a member" 

Thanks (4)
28th Feb 2016 12:05

Unemployment in the EU

Youth unemployment is over 50% for many EU countries, and unemployment is rife in the EU, and Iceland (which was in serious trouble a few years ago) is doing better than anyone.

I think there will be a massive backlash over the distribution of refugees and even more so if Turkey becomes a member.

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/File:Unemployment_rates,_seasonally_adjusted,_December_2015.png

 

Thanks (1)
28th Feb 2016 12:54

And the connection with accounting or taxation is ...

... zilch!

One thing that I have made up my mind about is my dislike of the powers that be in AWeb promoting political discussions on Any Answers, which is supposed to be a forum for technical queries.  If you must start political arguments, do it in Time Out, where it can be ignored by most of us.

Thanks (19)

Politics

Euan MacLennan wrote:

... zilch!

One thing that I have made up my mind about is my dislike of the powers that be in AWeb promoting political discussions on Any Answers, which is supposed to be a forum for technical queries.  If you must start political arguments, do it in Time Out, where it can be ignored by most of us.

I agree. Over many years I have learnt that politics (and religion as it happens) is best kept separate from professional life. It would be bad enough if a rogue member initiated a political debate, but why AWeb itself does so baffles me.

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29th Feb 2016 13:01

Disagree

johngroganjga wrote:
Euan MacLennan wrote:

... zilch!

One thing that I have made up my mind about is my dislike of the powers that be in AWeb promoting political discussions on Any Answers, which is supposed to be a forum for technical queries.  If you must start political arguments, do it in Time Out, where it can be ignored by most of us.

I agree. Over many years I have learnt that politics (and religion as it happens) is best kept separate from professional life. It would be bad enough if a rogue member initiated a political debate, but why AWeb itself does so baffles me.

With all due respect, I disagree with both of you.

Of course Aweb should be about technical queries but, just occasionally (and this is one of those occasions IMO), the real world and the big questions intrude. This is an opportunity for those of us who are apolitical to engage in a truly serious issue: I would never dream of going on a politics forum (do they even exist?), yet I've been able to express my view and read other people's opinions both on here and also on my football club's excellent fans forum as I mentioned in my earlier post.

In fact, what I forgot to mention then was that said forum was heavily in favour of the out vote even though I live in a town which would elect a monkey if it wore a red rosette and even though its political leanings are decidedly to the left of Jeremy Corbyn on the whole. I therefore feel this is an issue which crosses the political divide and it's far too broadbrush, as some have suggested, to consider that the Left favour the in vote and the Right the out or even that younger people are necessarily more in favour of Europe.

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03rd Mar 2016 12:35

OUT

Euan MacLennan wrote:

... zilch!

One thing that I have made up my mind about is my dislike of the powers that be in AWeb promoting political discussions on Any Answers, which is supposed to be a forum for technical queries.  If you must start political arguments, do it in Time Out, where it can be ignored by most of us.

Just because I don't won't to file pesky Intrastat, EC Sales List & VAT MOSS returns!

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28th Feb 2016 15:58

this is really scary

This referendum isn't about short term issues - like the cost of German cars; nor is it about medium term stuff like the present migration problems. It is about where this country is going to stand over the next 100+ years. It is about what you want for your grandchildren and theirs. Have bit of long term vision.

Ask them what they want because they arethe ones who will have to live with it longest.

Of course the EU would do a trade deal with the UK - just like it has with Norway - the EU states the rules and Norway as little choice but to agree. And in 30 or 50 years time will China or India or even Australia be concerned about the UK?

And do so going on about the EU being undemocratic. Why do you think that is so? Because none of the national politicians (UK or any of the others) are prepared to allow that because that would reduce their power. So the EU is kept undemocratic so everyone can complain about it.

And in no way do of I buy the argument that being governed by Cameron or Boris or Corbyn or (insert name of your choice) is any better than being governed by anyone else.

Oh and one more point for you accountants - who will do better at reining in the mega US corporations and getting Google and others (including non-corporates to pay tax? 

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By Locutus
28th Feb 2016 16:48

EU free trade deals

One of the things that I found quite interesting is just how few free trade deals the EU currently has around the world.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Union_free_trade_agreements

If the UK leaves, then it certainly makes sense to try and negotiate a trade agreement with the EU, but not having one does not seem to hinder the likes of the US, China, Japan, Australia, India and indeed most of the countries in the world.

 

 

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By cfield
28th Feb 2016 17:44

The EU has outlived its usefulness

Something nobody has commented on yet, either here or in the media, is what would happen if a future Prime Minister decided to discard Cameron's somewhat woolly deal. After all, that's exactly what Tony Blair did after John Major negotiated an opt-out from the Social Chapter. He opted us back in because he wanted to be at the heart of Europe. He also gave away half our rebate and did his best to drag us into the Euro.

None of the concessions so painstakingly negotiated will be worth the paper they're written on until they are incorporated into a treaty, and that will require the consent of future leaders who have had nothing to do with the recent negotiations. If another EU-mad PM comes to power, we might even dump them ourselves.

I mentioned this on another thread but there was a really interesting article by Matt Ridley in The Times last week on how the EU is stifling innovation. It's real food for thought.

www.rationaloptimist.com/blog/the-eu-and-innovation/

It seems to me the EU has now outlived its usefulness and the future lies in more flexible trading and political arrangements. Ultimately it will have to change or die, and other countries are starting to recognise this too, not just us. If we vote to stay, it will only delay this process.

It annoys me how the Government is deliberately lining up as many people as possible to scare the wits out of us. None of their doom-laden predictions hold water. If there is a vote to leave, the markets will go crazy for a while, but in pretty short order, the political elites on both sides of the Channel will go into damage limitation mode and ensure trade and security are affected as little as possible.

We'll probably end up with the sort of relationship with Europe we wanted all along. Despite the ominous noises we're hearing from some EU leaders now, it simply isn't worth them cutting off their noses to spite our face. They will have to cut a deal with us, and it will be just as much on our terms as theirs (if we do vote to leave that is).

I think Britain will thrive outside the EU. We won't be forced to accept the same terms as Norway and Switzerland as we have much more clout than them. We will probably accept a certain amount of EU immigration but without the floods we're seeing now, which will be dwarfed by the influx if and when Turkey joins. How on earth are we going to keep jihadists out of this country then? London could end up like Baghdad with car bombs going off every day.

For the avoidance of doubt, I say Leave for 3 main reasons. In order of importance:

1) Our economy will grow much faster if we're not shackled to the EU

2) No more laws forced on us by the EU other than those agreed on an arms length basis with a proper quid pro quo

3) Control over our own borders, better security and immigration down to manageable levels our infrastructure can cope with

 

Thanks (5)
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28th Feb 2016 20:48

Out

No question.

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28th Feb 2016 21:49

@cheeky & @marion

as a  white old male myself i see nothing wrong with mentioning demographics, when did you last look at a tax credit application? i like to know how 'groups' of people vote generally so i can try and reach a  better understanding , this is not ageist , racist or anything else its just determining the facts 

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29th Feb 2016 08:56

I'd like to hear both sides of Camerons 'deal'

The 'out' ministers will not be able to view 'referendum related' material, and logic tells me it wouldn't be withheld if it was good news for the 'in' campaign.

We have been told Cameron has promised to permanently station 1,000 of our troops in Poland in exchange for the Polish minister not blocking the benefit reforms. EDITED: it may be 1,000 troops not 2,000.

We know Merkel is pushing for an EU army, where the EU will have total control of our troops and defences. Has he promised that too? What else has he promised to France and the other individual EU countries?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/eu/11861247/Merkel-expects-Cameron-to-back-EU-army-in-exchange-for-renegotiation.html

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/648052/EU-referendum-Brussels-plot-military-merger-UK-stay-in-British-Army-UKIP

We need to know now, not after the referendum.

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11th Mar 2016 07:35

We're beginning to learn ...

What Cameron offered in exchange for his much watered down 'deal' .....

http://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/651180/Furious-MPs-eurozone-Cameron-Britain

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29th Feb 2016 09:24

My view

It would be good if we were part of a Europe-wide union but with power passed down to the appropriate level so that places like Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, the South West of England, South East of England, East Anglia and other regions could make their own decisions as much as possible. Simply trying to shoehorn all countries and areas into one mass decision-making one rule for all political entity would be a disaster as the attempts so far with the Euro, freedom of movement and mass immigration have shown.

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29th Feb 2016 11:10

Out

.

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By mwngiol
29th Feb 2016 13:08

Stay

I'm already sick of the politicians debating this. My main bugbear atm (I'm sure I'll have plenty more by the time it's over) is people on the 'Leave' side going on about 'Project Fear', then embarking on a shedload of scaremongering of their own.

All I basically want to see is a simple (but complete!) list of what will change under the new agreement, in plain English.

As thing stand I intend to vote to stay.

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29th Feb 2016 13:18

Won't happen

mwngiol wrote:

All I basically want to see is a simple (but complete!) list of what will change under the new agreement, in plain English.

The problem is you'll get different answers depending on who's responding. Even the best of buddies on the Conservative party are at odds with each other, one claiming it restores a good chunk of sovereignty to the UK, and one claiming it isn't worth the paper it's written on since the ECJ can overturn it.

That is just one example. You have to vote based on what you personally believe, after giving the matter thought on what you can verify as facts, rather than on the basis of an uncertain deal that may never be enforceable.

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29th Feb 2016 14:02

What about you?

mwngiol wrote:

I'm already sick of the politicians debating this. My main bugbear atm (I'm sure I'll have plenty more by the time it's over) is people on the 'Leave' side going on about 'Project Fear', then embarking on a shedload of scaremongering of their own.

All I basically want to see is a simple (but complete!) list of what will change under the new agreement, in plain English.

As thing stand I intend to vote to stay.

Aren't you able to come up with your own list?

Do you get people to do everything for you?

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By mwngiol
29th Feb 2016 14:24

Well it's a referendum

petersaxton wrote:

mwngiol wrote:

I'm already sick of the politicians debating this. My main bugbear atm (I'm sure I'll have plenty more by the time it's over) is people on the 'Leave' side going on about 'Project Fear', then embarking on a shedload of scaremongering of their own.

All I basically want to see is a simple (but complete!) list of what will change under the new agreement, in plain English.

As thing stand I intend to vote to stay.

Aren't you able to come up with your own list?

Do you get people to do everything for you?

I'm ever so sorry. I realise now that expecting simplified information to be provided when the government calls a referendum into something legally complex is just out of order, and expressing a wish that such information would be provided is clearly indicative of not doing anything for myself. I would thank you for your constructive criticism but as I'd have to do it myself I won't bother.

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