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How much should I charge for a workshop?

A county wide professional body for a fairly low income group of sole traders (most of them turn over around £15k- £20k per annum) has asked me to give a training workshop on basic accounts, record-keeping and tax to its members. The workshop would last 2 hours, have around 25 delegates and give me a really good opportunity to gain business from the attendees or through subsequent word of mouth to others. I am thinking of charging around £150 does that sound about right?

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20th Aug 2009 00:20

Fee
I don't mean to be funny but who cares what the fee is? The opportunity it presents is what's important.

I'd personally do it for nothing and look forward to a large number of new clients signing up, all in the same industry, all with the same requirements and all educated by you on how to maintain and present their records.

Happy days.

http://www.seahorseuk.co.uk

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By stgreg
20th Aug 2009 13:44

who will pay you?
If it is the professional body you should charge them - and not forget that it will/should take you at least 10 hours to prepare a proper professional presentation. So what would you charge for 12 hours?

If the delegates would pay charge them a nominal amout - say £10 or £20 - because if they pay they will be more likely to turn up.

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By Anonymous
20th Aug 2009 14:30

Probably best to charge a fee per delegate
Thanks. I'm actually also thinking now that if I do a thorough professional presentation taking the delegates through the whole accounting and self-assessment process, that they are actually less likely to need an accountant! So perhaps charging a nominal fee is the best way.

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By stgreg
21st Aug 2009 08:51

that is the trick!
What you want is to get them to understand enough about it so that they can see the value of using an accountant (ie you) and not doing it themselves - so you tell them what needs to be done but not necessarily how to do it all.

At the same time of course you want them to keep decent records - because you don't want them to dump a bag of scraps of paper on you and have you do all their filing and scheduling.

You need to get your focus onto the objective and tailor what you teach them accordingly.
You also need to think as to whether you really want a load of clients whose incomes are less than £20k

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By Anonymous
21st Aug 2009 13:37

Definitely nominal charge
If you could teach them everything they needed to know in a two hour seminar, they didn't need your help in the first place. Could you have understood it all in that time?

I'd go for the signing up the whole bunch as clients - even allowing for their low incomes - charging them a fixed fee they can afford providing they keep records in a format you prescribe. I agree with charging a small fee to individual delegates just to make sure they actually turn up and to cover your costs in case it doesn't work out. You could always give it back as a discount on their first assignment.

The other alternative, if they really want to do it all themselves, is to charge a small fee for the initial seminar but make it clear that there is a realistic charge per delegate for future seminars with a minimum of x delegates to make sure your time is properly paid for.

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By JWB
11th Nov 2010 20:05

Accounting workshops

Hello

Accounting workshops are something I am going to introduce into my own accounting practice - if you did the workshop can you give any feedback to me as to how successful the workshops were ?

thanks

 

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