Share this content
0
9
1266

Left AND right align

This has baffeled me for years...  Or maybe bafelled? 

Say I want to put a customer address in the top left of a Word document but I also want to put my address on the right (using the same lines).  Pretend I have run out of letterhead.

How do I do this?  Can it only be done by tabbing?

Replies

Please login or register to join the discussion.

You could use a table...

One row, two columns = two cells addresses in both. Left align one and right align the other.

Thanks (0)
27th Apr 2012 15:37

!

Steve Kesby wrote:

One row, two columns = two cells addresses in both. Left align one and right align the other.

 

Hmmm, why didn't that occur to me...  My mind isn't working properly it seems!  Good idea :)

Thanks (0)
avatar
27th Apr 2012 16:14

Or a text box

Might be easier to use a text box for your own address, as that's static data.  You can then type/paste the client's name in as normal.  With a table you'll probably  have to do each cell separately.

Thanks (0)
27th Apr 2012 16:57

Both good!

I wasn't 'thinking outside the (text) box' clearly!

It is purely because I sometimes have to write a letter for a client, which needs their address on it too.  It's a rare occurrance, but one that I always had issues with.

Thanks (0)
27th Apr 2012 21:17

Why?

I still don't see why you need both addresses side by side.

I print a name and address on the envelope.

 

Thanks (0)
avatar
28th Apr 2012 06:42

From recollection, if you start with left align, type, then hover your cursor at right margin, an additional right align section comes up?

Thanks (0)
avatar
By BKD
28th Apr 2012 08:59

Simplest method?

Why not just do as you suggest in the opening question - use a right tab stop?

Thanks (0)

Am I missing something?

When I want to do this I use the header as it is divided into 3 sections

Thanks (0)
avatar
28th Apr 2012 21:34

Text boxes

every time.  For instance I always put the addresse's name and address in a text box so that it can easily be adjusted to fit the window in an envelope.  Similarly any text that requires positioning can be similarly treated.

Thanks (0)