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Practising Certificate

I have recently passed my final ACCA exams, and have 5 years experience working in industry and practice. I am looking to set up a company part time, alongside my current full time job.

I would be offering services such as tax returns / accounts for sole traders, partnerships and small ltd companies (who do not require an audit) , aswell general book-keeping & payroll services.

I am finding it difficult to gain information on whether i need a practising certificate to do this? Can anyone provide any advice for me on this?



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09th Feb 2012 10:27

yes you do - check the ACCA rule book

u can't do more than trial balance and VAT without it

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As above, you will be in breach of ACCA practicing definitions by operating on a part time basis.  You need 2 years post qualification experience before you can even submit an application.

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By acky
26th Feb 2012 15:37


You need 2 years post membership experience with an ACCA approved employer, unless you work within a different industry and have a senior or external accountant who can verify and sign off your experience, however (i think) they have to be ACCA members.


I am in the same boat and struggling as i work for a charitya nd cover all the cometencies required for a practising certificate and my senior is not qualified.  Im doing some work with an ACCA aproved employer, however its only 14 hours a week so will take me forever.

I may be made redundant soon and wont even be in a position to set up in practise, although i have all the experience in company accounts and audit. 


I was looking at the website for registration with the institure of independent examination, but it still comes down to the ACCA rules, you have to have a practising certificate with them no matter what else you hold.


I can only find work with an unqualified firm, however they dont recomend that either, so a little short of avenues considering the current job situtaion.

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