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Voice dictation software

We are reviewing standard practices and already use a bank of standard letters. Bespoke typing however remains the problem but does not justify a full time typist. Does anyone have experience of voice dictation software and any particular pacjkage which can be recommended

thanks

PAUL

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17th Jun 2011 08:52

Dragon Naturally Speaking

 I was at a trade fair this week and did a demo of Dragon and it really does look awesome. I gather it needs quite of lot of training by yourself to set up (the guy demo'd it with me watching) and is a bit too much of a punt at £500 plus. Paying a typist is of course more expensive.

I find I just type my stuff direct and it is almost as quick.

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17th Jun 2011 09:39

Word?

We utilise the auto-correct feature for the 'bits' we type regularly, eg. yf is replaced by Yours faithfully, ys becomes Yours sincerely, our initials are replaced by our full name.

These are very simple, quick & easy to set up, but can save a fair bit of time if used regularly (which we don't anymore).

Have a blank 'empty' letter template, and, if your software doesn't generate letters for you, you can paste names and addresses into the letter.

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By Flash Gordon
17th Jun 2011 09:59

Dragon

I tried out Dragon and it was a waste of space. It didn't matter how clearly I spoke there were certain words that it just would not recognise. Luckily it didn't seem to pick up all the swear words I used either! Miles quicker to just type into Word...

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17th Jun 2011 10:27

Flash

 Thanks Flash that is good to know. Particularly when combined with not being able to test the software myself. 

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By 3569787
03rd May 2016 18:07

Software training

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17th Jun 2011 14:44

Dragon

I recently used Dragon's free offering for the iphone - and was very impressed at how well it picked up words without any training whatsoever.

Although I have only used this for short notes text messages and emails on my iphone... I haven't used it for letters - nor have I used the full pc version - I have to say i was impressed.

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20th Jun 2011 08:15

Voice dictation software

Thanks for these comments. We did try over 10 years ago to use voice dictation software and it was a disaster. It seems that the reviews are still mixed and in all probability it is now time to sharpen up the typing skills. Thanks for the comments

 

PAUL

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23rd Jun 2011 12:26

Voice dictation
I use dragon dictate 10 which I find excellent.

I'm not keen on the Philips dictating machines far too complicated so I have bought a new Sony.

Dictated using the system.

Hope this helps,

Michael Royde

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23rd Jun 2011 12:26

There was a post by a poster called twoboys

This was in 8 JUly 2010.  He had used Dragon Naturally Speaking Professional for 12 years ie from 1988 with great sucess.  In the article he covered pros and cons. I printed out a copy of the article for future reference.

I have tried the cheper version and never had much sucess

 

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23rd Jun 2011 12:29

Dragon - great for internal notes maybe not right for letters

I use Dragon on the iPhone / iPad all the time. Echoing previous posts - I find it amazing as a way of capturing notes, minutes, etc. that will only be used internally but it does make mistakes which does make it unsuitable for external-facing comms.

I have heard that Dragon is the best so it might be that for client letters the technology is not quite there yet...

Michael

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23rd Jun 2011 13:34

Not worth the hassles

And then you have an accent. Oops!

Some way to go for that type of software.

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23rd Jun 2011 14:42

I've used Dragon before

I abandoned it because the way I use the application software meant it wasn't worthwhile, but that's me; the samemight not be true for you.

I disagree with others that it's a complete waste of time.  I think some expect too much from it.  There are ways of working successfully with dictation software if you accept that it will have limitations.  I would make the following observations:

you already say that you use standardised letters - it is quickier and easier to remove content than to add it, so make sure you constantly updating and adding (if appropriate) to the standards (in terms of both the standard documents you have and their content) so that they can readily be modified for most situations you encounter.dictation software can be used to effectively navigate menus (where they exist! - this benefit may be a bit redundant with modern variants of MS software - I'm still a dinosaur using Office 2003, but I understand you can Office 2007/Office 2010 doesn't have menus although, I think, they can be enabled).  Combining this feature with autotext entries (with a name the dictation software will easily recognise!) can also bring some effective results quite quickly.training - dictation software requires training (which does take some time time) and so does the user, but don't go overboard, because as ever the law of diminishing returns applies.as noted you must expect that there will still be errors in the dictated content, but where you're producing long documents, it's quicker to correct/format an unformatted document with errors than type it from scratch.

I think that using dictation software this way could be very useful for someone preparing lengthy ad-hoc reports, for example, but when it's the odd letter, combining your standards with a type as you go approach may be best for you, as I decided it was for me.

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23rd Jun 2011 15:40

Garbage in - garbage out
Not wishing to remain a luddite, I bought Dragon (in the 1990s). Whenever I spoke, the words on screen were NOT what I said. I shouted at the screen to that effect. I spent ages trying to correct the text.
The box is still on my shelf gathering dust. Like the weather forecast - speech recognition software lies to you.

I've been using software since 1982, (WordStar). Their hints were to use a template. I found that advice useful, and still adopt, adapt, and improve. I would have liked to have used Speech recognition for things like Notes of Meetings (with Revenue, Clients, etc), as well as for writing my novel, which is still at Chapter 2.

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By bduncan
23rd Jun 2011 17:15

Posted using Dragon

I have had Dragon software for a couple of months now and am using it for this post. I personally do not like you letter writing as has been said above which does make many areas (that was supposed be errors not areas) and sometimes when reading biker cannot remember what I originally said and the meaning of what Dragon interpreted was nonsense.
That said I to (should have been do) use it for data inputting numbers as it frees up my hands I can use the mouse 10 pen and Dragon, which does speed up the data reporting (should have been inputting).
Also on occasions it does commands like deleting everything and I don't want it to.
Three errors in the above, definitely could do better.

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23rd Jun 2011 18:09

Mis-hearing of Dragon software

To the last "poster":  Trying to make sense of what you have "written" merely proves the point.  By the way, when I watched the Six Nations Rugby a couple of years ago, I put the text subtitles on.  Usually to learn the words of ALL the National Anthems, so that I can sing along to those players that sing so proudly, having been chosen to represent their country.  Mmm nice.  However, although the commentator said "the sound which emanates from the stadium" the subtitles said "sand-wich".  Again, I have read this in preview form - before pressing the submit button - as I'm also The GoodEnglish Professor

 

 

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23rd Jun 2011 19:01

try Outsec, very good

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23rd Jun 2011 19:01

try Outsec, very good

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25th Jun 2011 12:01

OutSec Online Secretarial Support Services

I am the founder and MD of OutSec. We are a UK-based remote secretarial support service. Clients use digital recorders or our iPhone app Dictamus, and send files for transcription to a dedicated typist with at least 10 years experience in the accountancy profession. If you require more information please visit our website at www.outsec.co.uk, or contact me directly by email or phone.

We have no fixed fees, monthly spends or hidden costs. You only pay when you dictate so it offers the full flexibility of outsourcing and is ideal for those companies such as yours not using a full-time secretary. We can input into templates or direct into a client case management system.

hope this is of help to you...

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29th Jun 2011 18:57

DRAGON NATURALLY SPEAKING WITH TALKING POINT

I have used Dragon since it first came out and have been through many versions; Dictate through to Naturally Speaking, but have always used the Professional version. For several years I have used it linked to an application called Talking Point produced by GHG Software Developments in Milton Keynes.

It works very well after one has trained it to recognise one's voice. So well I have not updated my last version which is over 3 years old. I have a Geordie accent and the software copes very well. The issue is training the software to recognise your voice and one must recognise that all training takes time, and is ongoing. A bit like CPD. I endorse voice recognition whole heartedly.

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30th Jun 2011 13:46

Dragon Professional

I have been using Dragon NaturallySpeaking for about three years and have now moved up to version 11.

This is printed as I have spoken - no corrections!

There is no doubt that it takes time to get used to using this software, but it is definitely quicker than typing and at least one colleague was finding that despite being a trained typist she was getting problems with RS I and similar complaints.

It does also generate some very strange typing errors, for example raise a bill can be transcribed as razorbill!  However, with perseverance you should have no problem with it provided you are prepared to be careful and disciplined in the way you use it.

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