VAT fraudster jailed for extra 10 years

A convicted VAT fraudster has been sentenced to a further 10 years in jail after failing to pay a £14m confiscation order. 

Jasbinder Bedesha was originally jailed for seven-and-a-half years in 2008 for his part in a conspiracy to steal £38m in a missing trader VAT fraud. 

At a retrial in 2011, Dubai-based Bedesha was found guilty of conspiracy to cheat the public revenue and to launder money.

But after he failed to pay the £14m confiscation order, the default sentence of 10 years will now come into effectBedesha was due to be eligible for release later this month. 

HMRC was also granted a serious crime prevention order and a financial reporting order against the fraudster. 

Continued...

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Comments

How does that add up?    1 thanks

pennylj | | Permalink

So, he failed to pay the £14m confiscation order and now taxpayers have to pay for his encarceration for another 10 years ...

How does that add up?

Its a deterrent - allegedly

john woolmore | | Permalink

The sentence is meant to be a deterrent or so we are led to believe.  However other than more drastic punishment such as the lopping off of hands it is the worst we can do by depriving him of his freedom.  But even if we were to lop his hands off we would then have him on disability payments for the rest of his life!!  So this is probably the cheaper option after all.

 

standard operating practice

mike_thompson | | Permalink

He failed to pay and had his sentence amended for it.  We pay the costs of all prisoners here in the uk.  I'm not sure what your point is?  This has been happening for some time, were you away or did you miss the memo.

Thank you for your comments.

pennylj | | Permalink

Thank you for your comments.

Should we continue to do things that we can't afford and that don't work just because we always have?

There is no need to chop off people's hands even. 

IMHO smart/bright minds - including his - can be put to work so that he contributes towards his costs and our losses.

That was my point.

One simple question

andyhopkins | | Permalink

pennylj wrote:

Thank you for your comments.

Should we continue to do things that we can't afford and that don't work just because we always have?

There is no need to chop off people's hands even. 

IMHO smart/bright minds - including his - can be put to work so that he contributes towards his costs and our losses.

That was my point.

Would you employ him?

 

On the other hand this is

Vinoo | | Permalink

On the other hand this is also a reflextion on HMRC's intelligence

Hi Penny

mike_thompson | | Permalink

Hi Penny

I wrote sounding harsher than i meant to be.  Costs and benefits of a civilised society i suppose.  We don't have rock breaking etc. and i don't think we can compel him to work anyway.  So his sentence is for punishment.  I suspect he won't be rehabilitated by his stay.  Best we can hope for(?) is the money he stole to be eroded by inflation denying him of delayed pleasure.

Dubai seems to be the UK equivalent of the cayman isles for american crooks.

 

 

 

#vinoo

andrew.hyde | | Permalink

Sorry mate but I don't quite get your point.  Can you expand on your comment a tad?

Nick Graves's picture

Divides

Nick Graves | | Permalink

pennylj wrote:

So, he failed to pay the £14m confiscation order and now taxpayers have to pay for his encarceration for another 10 years ...

How does that add up?

About £1.4M a year, or twice that if he's out after five for good behaviour.

I dunno how many CEOs could earn such a sum, tax-free and without living expenses or working 70hr weeks.

See, these self-appointed guardians of self-righteousness don't always think it through properly.