Excel 2013: Up close and personal

Self-professed Excel geek Simon Hurst  takes a closer look at some of the potentially useful new features in the latest Excel prototype.

There’s a big hint about the new features Microsoft thinks are the most important in the next version of Excel. The Welcome to Excel workbook that opens when you first start Excel 2013 shows three new tricks: Flash Fill, Quick Analysis and Recommended Charts.

If you make it through these three tricks, the Learn More sheet links to further information and help, including interesting facts such as an indication that, apparently, Microsoft doesn’t think that 3D pie charts are cool any more.

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  • Revised interface
  • Flash fill
  • Quick Analysis
  • Recommended Charts
  • PowerPivot and other features

Continued...

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Comments
TaxTeddy's picture

21st Century spreadheet    1 thanks

TaxTeddy | | Permalink

All credit to Microsoft for pushing back the boundaries. Funny thing is, I find myself drawn more and more to that old workhorse OpenOffice.

I’ve been using the trial licenced version of Excel & Word 2013

Trevor Scott | | Permalink

Visually/cosmetically it looks great, is easy to use, is stable software, isn’t demanding of my 4 year old PC. Only because I receive some sheets and documents that use its more sophisticated abilities, do I feel the need to pay out hard money for each “new” product. I personally could easily get away with using Excel and Word 95.  

TaxTeddy's picture

Me too

TaxTeddy | | Permalink

I bet I only use 20% of what the spreadsheets are capable of .... if that.

 

http://www.cambridgetax.co.uk/ctp/Home.html

Moving further away from the experienced or power user?

duncanphilpstate | | Permalink

Sounds to me like a further move by Microsoft towards the simplistic user to the detriment of knowledgeable power users. I'm not impressed by the sound of any of these features, and I can't see why they need to fiddle with the Ribbon.

Fortunately(?) at work we're still on 2007 with no announced date to move to 2010, let along 2013, so I'll probably be retired before I have to cope with it.

Now where's that OpenOffice installer gone?

There look to be some useful new features

paulwakefield1 | | Permalink

though I do find the new look hard to like (especially the "shouty" tabs").

I'll be interested to see how good the spreadsaheet auditing and comparison tools are. My third party versions, especially the spreadsheet comparison tool, will be hard to beat.

A word of warning for anybody uninstalling the Beta version of XL 2013. It doesn't do a very good job of cleaning uop the registry. It's unlikely to casue any problems but certain add-ins (such as FastExcel) can throw up errors. Scan the registry for any Office15 entries left behind. Usual caveats about the dangers of playing with the registry apply!

Simon,

Cantona1 | | Permalink

Simon,

Thanks for good article!

when you said "incorporation of PowerPivot technology into Excel itself!

How do these features differ from Excel 2010 power pivot?

shurst's picture

PowerPivot

shurst | | Permalink

Hi Cantona1 - thanks for the comment about the article - much appreciated.

The areas I had in mind when making that comment were the new 'data model' feature together with Relationships. You can link an Excel 2013 workbook to muliple external data sources and add them to the 'data model'. The Relationships feature is very similar to the Create Relationship option within the PowerPivot window and allows you to say which fields link tables to fields in other tables within the data model. I'm working my way through the new features in Excel 2013 and will hopefully cover this subject in more detail in the near future.

What's new ...

AndyOwl | | Permalink

I've just linked to your Inquire article, which was useful as I haven't got Professional Plus yet, so can't run it.  Link is from long blog summarising all new features of Excel 2013.  Also, let me know if you ever publish guest articles.