SEO secrets for accountants

Mark Lee talks with Onvizi's Nick Rink, who reveals various SEO techniques accountants can use to ensure they are found more often by prospects searching online.

I’m pleased to be able to talk to you about SEO, Nick because there is a lot of generic advice that needs tailoring for accountants.  Where do you suggest they should start?

The very first thing to consider is keyword analysis. Before you get started with marketing your practice online it’s important to consider what people are actually going to type into Google to find you.  

I have long been encouraging accountants to focus on a specific niche to make it easier to distinguish themselves from all the other ‘general practice’ accountants.  Does this make a difference in the context of keyword analysis?

Absolutely. There will be plenty of small business accountants in each area. And they will all be hoping that anyone searching online will find their website at the top of the list. But it’s easier to get to the top of a short list of specialists who focus on a specific sector or type of work – as long as it is one that the public might be searching for.

At it’s simplest, keyword analysis might start by focusing on the provision of professional bookkeeping services or tax return services. By using Google’s Keyword Tool you’ll be able to get a better idea of which popular terms are most suitable for your practice.

By registering or logging in to AccountingWEB, you will be able to see what else Nick Rink has to say about:

  • Using keywords to optimise your website
  • The importance of your site's Title tag
  • Importance of local search engine marketing
  • Optimising your Google Places listing Using citations to increase your search engine ratings

Nick Rink has over 15 years’ worth of experience working with SMEs and writes about local search, social media, the mobile web and other online marketing issues affecting small business owners. Nick runs Onvizi, an online marketing agency based in south west London.

Mark Lee is consultant practice editor of AccountingWEB and writes the BookMarkLee blog to help accountants build more successful practices more enjoyably. He is also chairman of the Tax Advice Network of independent tax consultants.

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Comments

basics first ...

JC | | Permalink

Validate your pages html etc - http://validator.w3.org/

Google sitemap (xml / dynamic) - http://support.google.com/webmasters/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=156184 - & sensible refresh times i.e. T&C=never, News Pages=weekly

Don't 'stuff' keywords & keep them down to 10 or fewer

Register with DMOZ etc.

bookmarklee's picture

Ahem

bookmarklee | | Permalink

JC - Those are hardly basics. I barely understand the concepts, what chance the average reader of this site?

Nick's comment when I copied your note to him was:

"that stuff is a little more technical which is why I didn’t include any of it. Has more to do with the technical setup of the site and how easy it is for the search engines to “crawl” the content, etc.

Have plenty to say about keywords and DMOZ, but that could take up a whole other blog post!"

Fundamentals rather than basics ...

JC | | Permalink

@bookmarklee - it is a good article but to my mind rather starts off in the middle of the process which is where I was coming from

Apologies, I take your point and probably should have said fundamentals rather than basics

Nevertheless if one doesn't have these in place from the start then all the additional SEO aspects could be for naught

For instance if the site is riddled with html errors (and many are) or Google has not been explicitly told where/what to find, then one may be starting off with issues

To some extent SEO is rather like decorating a house - the problem is that if the foundations are shaky or there are no walls then there is a fundamental issue. It doesn't really matter how good your decorating is there are un-necessary hurdles that prevent the optimum outcome

and a lot depends on whether search engines 'downgrade' sites or just don't move them all the way up the rankings if they find problems

Finally the web designer is key and whether or not they are on the ball; in this context I refer to http://www.accountingweb.co.uk/anyanswers/question/online-practice-docsafe to demonstrate the above about page errors

bookmarklee's picture

Thanks JC

bookmarklee | | Permalink

Nick's reply to your comments:

"He’s right and the foundations analogy is exactly the same one we use with our clients. Before starting work on any site we always carry out a full audit which will uncover any issues that need fixing.

SEO is pretty complex and [during the interview] we didn’t touch on things like geo-tagging, alt tags, Schema markup, content or linkbuilding strategies as I wanted to try and keep the content non-technical. All good points though."

I was just wondering what is

browncharles015 | | Permalink

I was just wondering what is the main relationship in between accountants and SEO as both the formats are totally different from each others, but the above post describes about how an accountant is able to find the perfect keyword or searching strategies through using search engine.

I have been learning a lot over from here regarding how to selecting right keywords to add my searching preferences in my small business and bookkeeping services.

http://www.delicious.com/lawrencefred86/local%20seo

 

SEO for accountants

ontime | | Permalink

Hi,

Which websites are good for accountants to place their backlinks. I am struggling to find websites with good PR and relevant to accounting?

 

http://cispayrollcontracts.co.uk

onpage seo

ontime | | Permalink

Can you tell me if this website has good onpageseo?

 

http://umbrellapayrollcompany.co.uk/