One manager down

April 26 - AM and I agonised for hours over what to do on the whistleblowing allegation.

The pattern of behaviour on the account we'd been told about could also be found on another account - run by the same manager.

But this was not evidence per se of wrong doing. So we reflected on things again and decided the circumstantial evidence was strong that wrong-doing could be happening but we would never win in court.

In that case we looked at the employee's contract. And this is clear that he may have an outside interest but he has to tell us what it is. In this case he has one - based at his home even - but has not disclosed it. We took legal advice, of course.

Then we called him in. We showed him the evidence that he has a trading company. We asked what it did. He was caught off guard. It traded, he said. But he could not immediately and convincingly say what in. Anything would have done, but it was obvious he had not prepared this.

So we advised him he was in gross beach of contract for failing to disclose over an extended period and was sacked immediately, leaving straight away in a taxi for home.

I'm being cautious - but one manager's name won't be appearing  here any more. 

I don't think we'll hear any more of this, but the curious part is that it does create opportunity for a management reshuffle and that may be no bad thing. 

 

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davidwinch's picture

Sorted!

davidwinch | | Permalink

It looks to me as if your swift and straightforward action has been well judged.  As you say, you will probably hear no more from your ex-manager who will realise that he has been 'rumbled'.

How have things been left with the whistleblower and what will be said to continuing employees?

One suspects that others may have known or suspected that the ex-manager was up to something and your 'message' that this will not be tolerated will be heard.

Are there any lessons to be learned for the future?

David

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