The Philip Fisher column | AccountingWEB

The Philip Fisher column

The world is overrun with blogs and tweets. While they serve a purpose, this column is something slightly different. You will not find out what the author had for breakfast or the colour of the socks he is wearing. You will not be pestered with tedious listings of every film, book, play etc that your correspondent has ever seen or his latest success or otherwise on the golf links.

What readers have come to expect from a writer who has been associated with AccountingWEB almost from its inception are objective but on occasion quite possibly opinionated articles about topics that might be of interest to accountants as people. The intention is to be simultaneously challenging, thought-provoking and entertaining.

Since the writer is a partner in the Human Capital team at BDO LLP these columns will frequently take on issues relating to taxation, business and government policy. For light entertainment, he is also London Editor of British Theatre Guide so there will be plenty of hints and tips about what to see and not to see.

He also regularly writes about technology for London Accountant and almost anything else under the sun for a variety of publications so there are always going to be odd surprises in store. Travel, art, books, theatre, sports and consumer issues are all likely to receive consideration in coming months - but so are taxation issues, thoughts on the latest technology and, inevitably, the activities of the Chancellor and HMRC.

Latest posts
Apr
08
5

Almost exactly one month before the election, the Labour leader has hit the headlines with a highly controversial announcement that his party would remove the tax reliefs available to UK residents domiciled overseas.

Apr
01
2

Forget accountancy, the boom business at the moment seems to be estate agency.

It might be April 1 but this is no joke. As the economy recovers, it seems that estate agents are taking over the world.

Mar
25
1

Many readers will have mixed feelings about the abolition of tax returns. While these little documents have often proved to be a real pain, they are also a good source of fees.

Mar
18

20 years ago, the Chancellor's Budget Speech was a thrilling, hotly anticipated event. Now, it has become a bore but will pre-election politicking change that?

Mar
11
2

This story will read as if April Fools’ Day had come three weeks early but there is serious talk of banks charging interest for looking after our money.

Mar
04
4

Watching the English playing any sport is the equivalent to seeing a Roman prisoner being gored by lions yet we still go on doing it in the naive belief that the boys will win.

Feb
25
3

If the ultra-rich can avoid and evade tax without any major recriminations, why should the rest of us pay tax at all?

Regular readers of this column will know that since its inception there has been a focus on the inadequacies brought on HMRC by its lack of financing.

Feb
18
4

Give or take the odd whistle-blower, it does not seem that anybody even peripherally involved in the Swiss bank account scandal is likely to come out of it well.

Feb
11

For those of us who occasionally wish that we were in a more glamorous profession, it can be a mixed blessing to discover tax as a constant in news headlines.

Feb
04
4

With almost 100 days still to go, it is easy to conclude that politicians care far more about the politics than the people.

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