Learning the violin

I have a sudden Yen to learn the violin (after dabbling at school a looooong time ago).

Any violin learners out there who can tell me, how long is it between first holding the violin and moving past playing scales and 'Twinkle Twinkle'?  I'm not expecting to be playing Chopin in a week, but just curious.

Assume average intelligence and musical aptitude!

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weaversmiths's picture

Violin

weaversmiths | | Permalink

When I was at junior school I chose to learn the violin.  Of course, I quickly tired of it but mother said I wasn't trying and made me keep at it.  However, my Grandmother was taken in when I said it gave me earache (probably gave her earache, too) so I was able to give it up.

I think it is one of the easier instruments to learn if you have an ear.  Easier to carry about than  a Cello!

TheAncientOne

Constantly Confused's picture

Thanks

Constantly Confused | | Permalink

Basically decided I quite fancy giving it a go again after a loooong absence. I can 'rent' one for a tenner a month, with £8 of that classed as a downpayment if I decide to keep the violin.

Personally for £30 (minimum rental), £6 of which is 'wasted' if I decide to buy it later, I don't think I can lose. If I don't take to it, then I'm down £30. I'll live.

weaversmiths's picture

Violin

weaversmiths | | Permalink

Learning to play music is enjoyable and theraputic especially so after a frustrating day - best of luck.  May see you on U-Tube yet?

TheAncientOne

Constantly Confused's picture

Thanks

Constantly Confused | | Permalink

weaversmiths wrote:

Learning to play music is enjoyable and theraputic especially so after a frustrating day - best of luck.  May see you on U-Tube yet?

TheAncientOne

 

I am looking for a stress reliever, though being nagged by my partner for making a sound like a dying cat may outweigh any benefits...

 

Not the easiest to learn

Halex | | Permalink

I had lessons for 11 years at school and by the end could play quite well (ran out of money at grade 8). To the ignorant though it still sounded painful at times. I wouldn't say it is the easiet instrument to learn. I taught myself classical guitar in a couple of years , which I found much easier and had the advantage of impressing my friends rather than driving them away.Looking at violins now I am very tempted by the electric ones as tone is less driven by the price of the instrument. Not too sure what an instrument at £10 per month will produce. Is it a Stentor?

 

 

Democratus's picture

I've had a hankerin to learn the Harmonica recently

Democratus | | Permalink

Perhaps now I will.

When / If I get good at it anyone want to join the AWeb Blues Band?

Constantly Confused's picture

Violin

Constantly Confused | | Permalink

Halex wrote:

 Not too sure what an instrument at £10 per month will produce. Is it a Stentor?

 

Model - Prima200

http://www.violincompany.co.uk/showviolin.php?violin_no=294

Intonation

Paulsoper | | Permalink

After many years of playing guitar, and then bass guitar, and then fretless bass guitar (don't worry I'm getting there) I decided to treat myself to an electric upright bass - 42" scale length just like an orchestral 3/4 double bass but without an enormous body, works by electrics.  The problem is intonation - for a long time with a fretless instrument you need to learn where your fingers need to be to create the exact note - not just a little bit off, as the angle of your finger on the fretbaord is 85 degrees to the vertical but 90 degrees to the vertical.  Now a violin has a scale length which is 1/4 of a bass, so your fingers will need to be 4 times more accurate - this is why, in my opinion, a violin is the cruellest instrument to give to a child - 1 in 100, maybe 1 in 1,000 might have the necessary intonation skills and be able to proceed with it.  If you don't think you have the necessary skill of being able to hear the necessary accuracy of intonation please choose another instrument, preferably with frets - from a guitar to a ukulele back to a bass guitar, because it will enable you to develop your musical inclination without torturing yourself.  I hate myself when I move up the neck of the bass - I can hear just how wrong my intonation is and I know I'm only a minute fraction out, in my office/studio only I hear it but I want to be able to play with others and embarass myself doing so, which doesn't happen with other instruments I play..  The great thing about music is playing with other people and unless you have the necessary degree of intonation my guess is you will end up frustrated and never know the joys of playing with others.  I could be completely wrong, if you go ahead i sincerely hope I am, but the violin is an instrument that requires skills which are quite exceptional.

Stickers on the finger board can help with intonation

Halex | | Permalink

It's what the kids do and it works up to a point. Only danger is that you get a bit cross-eyed.

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