Made in Britain?

Did anyone watch the Mary Portas program last night on TV? She highlighted the fact that goods described as British are not 'made' in Britain. Apparantly, if the goods are 'finished' in Britain then the goods can be described as British. 'Finishing' may mean dyeing, or changing the goods in some way.

As I like to buy British whenever possible, I find this appalling. How can I distinguish which goods are actually manufactured in Britain, and which goods are imported and then 'finished' in Britain????

Comments

Here Here!    1 thanks

accountright | | Permalink

I'm with you all the way on this one Shirley.  There was another documentary recently highlighting goods made in the Far East for a Scottish Clothing Company (think it was Pringle).  They also labeled them as Made in Britain when they were clearly only finished in Britain.  I believe the finishing involved sewing on the label

Polly

Flash Gordon's picture

'Made' in Britain?

Flash Gordon | | Permalink

I'm guessing that 'made in Britain' means manufactured in Britain but 'British' means 'we did a tiny part of the process here, just enough to con you into buying it'. Like 'made with' English butter (for instance) means it has English butter in it but might have the same amount of French marg, but 'made from' English butter means there was no French ingredient. Basically it's a cunning ruse to trick you into parting with your hard-earned dosh without them falling foul of the legalities.... Equally they have to be careful of using 'pure' but 'finest ingredients' means bugger all. The noble art of advertising!

 

ShirleyM's picture

@Flash

ShirleyM | | Permalink

That was mentioned, too. Goods 'made' in Britain could be 100% foreign imports that are assembled in Britain.

johnjenkins's picture

Come on    1 thanks

johnjenkins | | Permalink

in this day and age of con after con after con are we really surprised. Next you'll believe that banks are actually lending money to new business.

Flash Gordon's picture

@ Shirley

Flash Gordon | | Permalink

So basically you need to be buying goods that are 'made in Britain from British ingredients / parts'!  Ho hum. It really is a total con. Reminds me of an episode of NCIS (sorry, it's from the US!) where Tony is feeling healthy and virtuous because he's eating a 'health bar' but then Kate points out that actually most of the ingredients are variants on sugar :)

I'm surprised that politicians don't have second jobs in advertising - sounds like the perfect match.

ShirleyM's picture

@johnjenkins

ShirleyM | | Permalink

Surprised .... no!  Disappointed .... yes!

Why do we make it so easy for foreign goods to get labeled as British goods when being sold in this country? It's almost as if we help competitors get sales in Britain at the expense of British manufacturers.

You're right, Flash, it is a con. Many people try to buy British goods, and would never think to question if 'British' goods had been manufactured by slave/cheap labour abroad or meat raised in lower standards than our own animal welfare standards, etc., although I already knew about the misleading labels put on meat & meat products.

petersaxton's picture

Isn't it the EU?    1 thanks

petersaxton | | Permalink

I thought it was the EU that decided on what had to be disclosed about origin? I remember watching a program that said medical equipment could be said to be made in Germany if a German visited a factory in India to look at children making equipment manually. The instruments had to be so perfect (for fear of damaging vital organs during operations) but it was impossible to be sure about this in India and there were only rudimentary checks before the instruments were distributed to hospitals.

Mary was glorying the days when factories were full of workers making things in the UK. If you want to insist on having a minimum wages and benefits for people not working you will never have full factories in this country. If there's schools that don't believe in excellence and not willing to educate people to prepare them for a working world then there will be many children not able to get a job after school and university.

Some might believe in a few billionaires funding millions of people in this country but it will not happen. We need workers who have the ability, attitude and willingness to work and then the country will be in a position to reverse the slide to bankruptcy.

 

Cheese Made in Britain

sarah douglas | | Permalink

Hi 

As you know I am from Ireland and Live in Scotland but I do believe strongly in buying local food.  

This is a difficult one for me as I know the Cheese Industry keeps many farmers going at home. 

Most of the cheese purchase in the UK is from Ireland , Lavita and New Zealand.

The question does need to be asked why is it  cheaper for Tesco to import from Ireland then pay the British Farmers.  Personally I think the government has made it so expensive to run a business with so much red tape .

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/6568567/Latvian-cheddar-now-outselling-the-original.html

 

memyself-eye's picture

I am happy to advise

memyself-eye | | Permalink

That our family's potatos are 'made' in Britain, Sutton Coldfield in fact (and collected personally by my wife) - but our Japanese Suzuki Alto is made in, err, India.

Next time I'll buy a MINI, but not a countryman which is built in Austria (and is hideous !)

 

 

  

support your farm shop---the

uktaxpal | | Permalink

support your farm shop---the produce is brit --it cn be seen in the fields?

thisistibi's picture

Lol

thisistibi | | Permalink

uktaxpal wrote:

support your farm shop---the produce is brit --it cn be seen in the fields?

Yeah... grown in the fields and then supplemented with imports! Nice.

Retailers should be able to tell you where their goods are made

Jimess | | Permalink

I try not to buy Chinese imports as much as I can, although this is proving particularly difficult these days as you just don't know what is inside the gadets you buy.  Unfortunately most major retailers do not educate their shop floor staff on the products they sell and most smaller retailers cannot afford to have a social conscience about their products.  Many times I have walked away from a purchase because no-one could actually tell me where the product was made.  More people should start asking questions then perhaps retailers would get the message that people do actually like to know where their goods originate. However I can just imagine the queues in the supermarkets on Saturday afternoons :)

 

thisistibi's picture

?

thisistibi | | Permalink

Jimess wrote:

I try not to buy Chinese imports as much as I can

Isn't that a bit racist?  Buying British and not buying Chinese is not the same thing....

Not at all

Jimess | | Permalink

Not at all, although I can appreciate why you might think that from the posting.  I actually try not to buy any goods that are produced by countries with poor Human Rights policies and like the original post I too try to buy British as much as I can to help support the local economy.  My point really was to illustrate that retailers do not ensure their staff have sufficient knowledge about the products they sell to help people make ethical choices if they so wish.

really

uktaxpal | | Permalink

thisistibi wrote:

uktaxpal wrote:

support your farm shop---the produce is brit --it cn be seen in the fields?

Yeah... grown in the fields and then supplemented with imports! Nice.

really-please explain

thisistibi's picture

Farm shops

thisistibi | | Permalink

uktaxpal wrote:

thisistibi wrote:

Yeah... grown in the fields and then supplemented with imports! Nice.

really-please explain

I mean that not everything in the farm shop is actually grown in the fields...

ok!I thought you meant

uktaxpal | | Permalink

ok!I thought you meant particular lines were mixed with imports e.g.eggs lettuce etc.

There has to be a marketing angle

The Black Knight | | Permalink

Truthful product labels ?

but then again that perhaps means you have not been caught out yet by 9 out of 10 cat owners that don't have cats.

We are all too willing to accept a smarmy liar, even when we know they probably are. They sound better, look better and are much more confident about their claims and perhaps tell us exactly what we wanted to hear ?

maybe we should get a statement signed to confirm the representations made to us when buying a product, so we can claim damages when it turns out to be a lie ?

petersaxton's picture

Liars

petersaxton | | Permalink

If somebody goes on about buying advertising and how much business I will get from it I ask if they will give me a free trial and I will pay for any responses I get. They always refuse but they can't explain what they have got to lose. It would appear that they prefer me to believe their lies rather than believe what happens.

ShirleyM's picture

Maybe cost could be used?

ShirleyM | | Permalink

So for something imported at a cost of £9, and it costs £1 to finish it, it could be 90% foreign and 10% British?

I am pretty careful where my food comes from, especially meat & fish, and in recent months Asda have started labelling some meat 'Produced in the UK, beef from the UK, packed in the UK'.

Lots of people want to buy British but we are being hoodwinked, and this deceit doesn't help our fellow countrymen. If the produce is Irish, British, French, from outer space ... whatever ... why are they afraid to tell us and feel it is necessary to disguise it as British????

arh but

The Black Knight | | Permalink

are the cows Irish ? Born in Ireland have Irish parents or just an Irish breed or were they black and whites that grew up in Ireland ?

and have they attained a domicile of choice.

perhaps we need a statutory residence test.

I think we need, an Irish breed, farmed in the uk (spent more than a year in the UK alive.......gets silly does it not).

Why cant we have a shade of honesty rather than more stupid regulation.

A name and shame website,...check out your food.com ?? How you would ever trace this I have no idea, may be have undercover reporters and ask producers to volunteer information for a cash reward.

or you could just buy locally

The Black Knight | | Permalink

from your trusted butcher or farmers market or small retailer who I am sure would tell you the truth ! not having been trained in marketing techniques.
As I have said may times the only effective vote you have is your £1 but it seems that most people vote for large supermarkets.

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