BAMFAM

BAMFAM - book a meeting from a meeting.  It's a mnemonic I use, or at least try to, during every meeting.  It might be that I book a follow up phone call, if there's no opportunity to assist the other party straight away, rather than another face-to-face meeting; I do something to keep the contact alive as the opportunity to develop a business relationship might come later or with a third party.

What do you use to remind yourself to do something?  Got any quirky ones to share or is BAMFAM as quirky as it gets?  I'll let you decide if BAMFAM is the most quirky or if any other suggestions beat it.

If you would prefer to get in touch direct please use the contact details shown.

Peter@boreaspartnership.co.uk

www.boreaspartnership.co.uk

07775 533735

 

Comments
bookmarklee's picture

Get Viccious with clients

bookmarklee | | Permalink

My most quirky acronymn is one I've used for years and still advocate during talks to help practitioners remember to consider ALL the tax consequences of clients' proposed transactions:

V - VAT

I - Income taxes (includes CT for companies)

C - CGT

C- Customs Duties

I - IHT

O - Other imposts and duties incl NICs

U - Uniform Business rates

S - Stamp duty and Stamp Duty Land Tax

And there's tax credits too....

So it's quirky, incomplete and misspelled too! ;-)

Mark Lee

petergill's picture

Mnemonics

petergill | | Permalink

I like Mark's mnemonic a lot - but then I do like the quirkier things in life!  Thanks Mark, any others out there?  Come on, there must be some more that you use on a regular basis and would be of use to others.

Peter

pushtheriver's picture

I use the cat

pushtheriver | | Permalink

I tie a knot in the (wife's) cat's neck. I can never remember why I did it but it never fails to cheer me up!

MichaelMCCarter's picture

Systems can be used to remind you what to cover

MichaelMCCarter | | Permalink

I love the mnemonics. Very useful. Another complementary approach is to use systems. For example, we have a series of fields in our CRM database that act as reminders for things to be discussed in a Client Meeting. You can then build a merge template that (with a few clicks) prints these items out down the right hand side of a page that you use for your Client Meeting Notes (i.e. the majority of the page is for note taking). Any blank field, for example, can be a prompt to ask the client questions, depending on the purpose of that particular meeting. For example, we have fields in our CRM such as Services We Provide, Services We Could Provide, Client's Goals and Priorities, Interests/Passions, Partner or Spouse and Kids Names, Related Entities, Related Clients, Financial Planner, Solicitor, Bank Manager, Insurance Advisor, Key Dates for Client, Proactive Contacts We Make Each Year, Plan Review (Date field for when we last reviewed the client's documented plan), Will Updated (date field), Referral Source, Referrals Provided, etc. (there are many more). Certain fields are 'moral obligation' issues where we 100% owe it to our clients to address them. FOr example, ensuring the client has an up to date will. Seeing that 'Will Updated' field as blank is an alarm bell for us. as that should be asked annually and then the client referred to a professional specialist in wills and estate planning. During the meeting, any blank field area can be written on, and after the meeting you can hand the Client Meeting Notes to your Client Services Assistant (or whatever your firm calls a person in a support role) and they can do the data entry to update the CRM fields.

petergill's picture

Systems

petergill | | Permalink

Perfect - using CRM systems to the full.  How many times have you held a meeting with a client and afterwards thought 'I wish I had asked them x, y or z'.  We tend to refer to it as creating a blueprint - a framework document for a meeting that everybody in the firm can use and so maximise the potential of asking the appropriate questions.  The more interest you show in a client the more likely they are to tell you something that you can then provide them assistance with.

You can argue that you always remember what to do and ask...however we are all only human and sometimes we have off days. Using these systems and memory triggers can be an aide to keeping you on the right track.

Any other suggestions & recommendations out there? 

Peter@boreaspartnership.co.uk

0845 8384723

www.boreaspartnership.co.uk

petergill's picture

BAMFAM

petergill | | Permalink

To give you an update, we used BAMFAM with a couple of groups of Managers in a practice and also in mentoring a Director in a live meeting with a prospective client. 

The Managers thought it was great, a memorable mnemonic; the Director used it as part of the meeting bluepint and secured the follow up meeting where, she admitted, she may not have done previously.  The Director subsequently held the follow up meeting and won a piece of business so justifying the process.

Have you used it yet, or applied Mark's Viccious?  Let us know your successes when you do.

Peter

peter@boreaspartnership.co.uk

www.boreaspartnership.co.uk

N.B. The next discussion topic to think about is a 'can-do' attitude. How is yours and how do you keep it positive?

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