Public sector loses £38bn to fraud

Fraud losses in the public sector are twice as high as previously thought, according to a new report.

The total public sector fraud losses stand at £38bn, with £22bn of this involving public expenditure and a further £16bn lost through uncollected taxes at both local and national level, according to the Financial Cost of UK Public Sector Fraud Report.

Continued...

» Register now

The full article is available to registered AccountingWEB members only. To read the rest of this article you’ll need to login or register.

Registration is FREE and allows you to view all content, ask questions, comment and much more.

Comments

So this report is saying ........

Anonymous | | Permalink

that because, on the face of it, we lose less than the international average, our losses must be underestimated.

Sounds a bit like scaremongering to me.   And just a few days before an election.   Cynic?  Moi?

 

It's outrageous!

Anonymous | | Permalink

I work in the public sector and I haven't seen a penny of this.

More seriously, I agree that each and every person responsible for public money needs to put fraud high on his or her agenda. Your article does n't really go into any depth - nor could it be expected to. It's effectively an expanded headline bolstered by a couple of rentaquotes. I need really to see the report in its entirety in order to understand what is being said, to comment effectively and to decide whether I should do anything that I don't already.Your article doesn't tell me where to find it, though I daresay Google could pick it up.

 

bruster's picture

Public Sector losses

bruster | | Permalink

It's just as well that HMRC managed to raise £39bn since 2005 to balance the public sector fraud losses and so UK plc is just in profit!

Gina Dyer's picture

Full report available

Gina Dyer | | Permalink

To the third poster: I agree with you that it's really hard to get sufficient depth going in an article of this length and you may need to read the full report to get a better grip on the details. I've made the PDF available for download on this page (you should see it just below the article text above). If, for any reason, you can't download it from here, you'll find it on MacIntyre Hudson's website (try this link).