Access introduces carbon emissions accounting module

UK accounting software developer Access has introduced what it claims to be the first program that monitors a company's carbon footprint as part of standard accounting processes.

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Posting removed ......

Anonymous | | Permalink

Mark

Has one of your postings (the one stating your personal commitment to sustainability) been removed?

The missing posting gave rise to the response of 29 February 2008 @ 12:11 PM and yet no longer seems present, which makes the follow up posting entirely random rather than having a reference point

In any event, removing postings is difficult because it interrupts the thread and can potentially change the meaning of an entire discussion rendering it meaningless

Sincerely hope this was not instigated by your employer

May I just say that...

Anonymous | | Permalink

Accounting for Carbon Emissions seems genius in its simplicity. Innovation of a so-called ‘carbon ledger’ by Access as a integrated part of their Dimensions solution appears to make recording, measurement and reporting of a firm’s CO2 footprint very straightforward.

Oh and for the record, jc, I don’t work for Access ! But I do applaud your pick up on this topic. It's right to challenge gimmicks. Access seem to be going ok without needing any green bandwagon though.

Could it be that they’ve perfectly anticipated the market ? – again!?

Mark - all credit to you ...

Anonymous | | Permalink

for adopting your personal approach. Your employer is lucky to have you as a champion in this area

This particular issue could run forever because both sides have strong views about motivation, drivers, goals, why now etc, although we all agree with the need for a wakeup call just how to achieve it

With this in mind it is probably appropriate to lay this thread to rest.

Overall picture ....

Anonymous | | Permalink

Mark

Are you the same Mark Fermor ('..dealer sales manager for Access Accounting..') in this article http://www.access-accounts.com/news/press-releases/28-09-2007.aspx ?

Of course it is also about personal responsibility which is why the final para in the previous posting eluded to government grants for individuals to install tangible solutions (i.e. solar panels). A simple question: have you ever considered installing any of these measures in your own property; the initial cost & longer term payback period is in most instances not viable even with a meagre Govt grant

The statement '..we as humans tend to think very short term..' is questionable. A lot depends upon ones background & profession, for instance an engineer who builds a 'short term' bridge (Brunel) would not be in great demand, whereas a salesman who sacrificed today’s sales figures for those in the future would also be in trouble; one is fairly permanent and the other transitory

The disappointing aspect is that this sort of approach is popularist (in vogue) and would probably never even appeared on the horizon if not to enhance ones USP in the market; basically is it a bandwagon to enhance sales under the mantel of a caring partnership and would these issues ever have been addressed independently if this whole area was not so high profile?

Of course the next step is to have a link to eco friendly projects to offset the business carbon footprint and for only £XXX one can buy ones way out of trouble - so those with the cash need not change whilst the poorer section suffers the brunt of the burden

Passion is a good thing but did it arise off your own bat or because the world is eventually waking up to the damage being caused; alternatively is the passion fuelled by the actions of ones employer?

I too am passionate about this issue but the difference between us is that I started looking at it in the mid 1980's (with wind generation) when it was regarded as 'wacky’ and not main stream - so you will forgive my scepticism with the 'band wagon' approach

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/environmentandgreenerliving/actonco2/DG_067197?cids=Google_PPC&cre=CO2Cal

accounting for sustainability

pauldruckman | | Permalink

I just could not leave a negative comment like "jc" out there unanswered! All the actions advocated by jc are fine but hardly to the point, I am afraid.

What Access are contributing to here is assisting in accounting for sustainability. I do not believe it is intended to be the complete answer but it does provide a start in a process for business, and finance professionals, to measure and report on carbon emissions. It is not about Access being green or trying to save the planet but an accounting software house providing finance professionals the tools to measure and report...what else could an accountant dream of!

(A biased view from a Non-Executive Director of Access Technology Group)

Save the planet - plant a financial tree ...

Anonymous | | Permalink

Gimmick or worthwhile - suggest gimmick!

This seems to be in the same vein as carbon offset, which in a great many instances is purely a salve to ones conscience rather than providing any genuine benefit. All this does is allow people to continue being as profligate as they want and simply offloading their guilt into planting a few trees (they don't even do themselves); which is not the answer

Without all the razzmatazz, here is a simple free suggestion for all businesses - turn off the lights etc. (and standby appliances) in your buildings after office hours.

There are so many real opportunities that organisations (especially government) can do to have an impact on global warming; they just seem incapable of doing anything except spouting rhetoric

Instead of Mr Yeo turning up for a 'photo shoot' why doesn't he address the real issues such as lobbying for all new houses to have such things as 'solar panels' or encouraging the government to introduce more available grants (rather than reducing the availability of them) for heat pumps, solar energy etc.