Anonymous
Share this content
22

.

.

Didn't find your answer?

.

Replies (22)

Please login or register to join the discussion.

avatar
By andy.partridge
27th Mar 2014 12:30

Matching

I don't think it is your age that is a problem. When agencies are looking for the most suitable match they will be looking at the person profile as well as the job description.

Take the accounts assistant as an example. You could do the job standing on your head, but a more suitable match might be, for example, a good junior for whom the job would be a step up or maybe an older experienced person happy to do the same job as until they near retirement.

It is less likely that you would be seen as suitable for a variety of reasons. You are over-qualified, you might get bored quickly and move on, you might be more qualified than your boss making for an uneasy working relationship.

I wonder if it is worth hanging on to your CA? Obviously it was hard-earned and probably has sentimental value. The question is, could it be an impediment to what you really want to do?

Good luck.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By Cantona1
27th Mar 2014 12:41

Most of the jobs advertised by the cowboys do not exist. They are fake, created to give the impression that they have lots of jobs and looking for the right candidate. The ethical "ACCA" has joined this sham.

Thanks (3)
avatar
By neileg
27th Mar 2014 13:09
Thanks (0)
avatar
By Cloudacre
27th Mar 2014 14:08

NED

With your breadth of experience then a few NED jobs may be better than one job.  It is also possible to work part time in practice or as a subcontractor.  These jobs are usually found by networking.

In my time as an FC I found that I could be very picky about selecting for interview.  Few people included their age in their CV (although obviously qualification dates gave a clue) but I think the thing that put me off some CVs was the lack of career path.  Some people seemed to dot around and take what they could get at the time, I felt they hadn't specialised.  That worried me because I thought they might not make a long term commitment to my organisation and intend to move on rather than move up.  It also meant that half their skills and experience weren't relevant whereas I could choose people whose career to date seemed to be leading up to the job I was recruiting for.  I know that sounds harsh but with 100 odd CVs to sift I had three discard piles - underqualifed, irrelevant experience, poor proof reading.

 

Don't be put off.  Be very selective in what you apply for, your covering letter is key to explaining why this role.  Do you have hobbies? A finance position in a company related to something you are genuinely passionate about might work. Otherwise temp/subcontract until you can find something perm.

 

Good luck

 

 

Thanks (0)
avatar
By Sherman Holter
27th Mar 2014 13:57

Inept

In my experience, "inept" is the defining adjective describing most of the recruitment consultants I have ever come across.

I tried the speculative letter and it's worked for me on a couple of occasions.  You may be considered for the job(s) that aren't even available yet (it happened to me).

You should do your research, find companies you like, draft a letter specifically with them in mind, print it on good quality paper (I used a very subtle shade of green to stand out from the reems of white) and send it by good old fashioned post.

It worked for me (at over 50)

MTFBWY

 

 

 

Thanks (2)
Replying to Vile Nortin Naipaan:
avatar
By andy.partridge
27th Mar 2014 14:30

Mistake

Sherman Holter wrote:

In my experience, "inept" is the defining adjective describing most of the recruitment consultants I have ever come across.

 

The mistake that some candidates make is to think the consultant is there to work for them. The consultant is not out to find the candidate a job but to fill a vacancy and before a competitor does.
Thanks (1)
avatar
By The Innkeeper
27th Mar 2014 14:41

if i remember rightly

the icaew does have some sort of careers advisory service.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By justsotax
27th Mar 2014 14:41

and of course not helped

by the respective employer often 'enhancing' the role being advertised to attract candidates who are over qualified but may accept lower salary etc 

Thanks (0)
avatar
By SThornton
27th Mar 2014 15:04

Try Reed.co.uk

You upload your CV and a covering letter and agencies can find you on it but there are also jobs on there you can apply for just by pressing one button. I did FTCs before becoming perm where I am now and Reed was the place I found the majority of my contacts that did that.

 

Yes, some of the roles that are advertised are there just to get your details to an agency but I started a rule that I would not register with an agency unless they had an interview for me, that separated the wheat from the chaff.

 

Also, is your DoB on your CV? It shouldn't be and isn't required to be as employers are not allowed to discriminate.

Thanks (1)
Replying to David Heaton:
avatar
By andy.partridge
27th Mar 2014 15:17

I disagree

SThornton wrote:

 

Also, is your DoB on your CV? It shouldn't be and isn't required to be as employers are not allowed to discriminate.


Marting is 45. Potential employers will think he is 65 if the DOB is omitted. 
Thanks (1)
Replying to nick farrow:
avatar
By SThornton
28th Mar 2014 12:45

.

Even if he was 65, they still wouldn't be able to discriminate.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By marting
16th Jun 2018 07:41

.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By Carat
27th Mar 2014 15:56

What part of Scotland

What part of  Scotland are you in?

Thanks (0)
Replying to paulhammett:
avatar
By marting
16th Jun 2018 07:39

.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By andy.partridge
27th Mar 2014 16:43

What industries have you worked in?

@ Marting

1. Don't omit your age/DOB - you say that employers could work it out if they look at your work history but why put them to that trouble?

2. Don't omit your part-time work. Turn it into a positive. A 4 year gap will get people thinking you are idle/unemployable/convicted criminal

3. Concentrate on applying for jobs in industries where you have considerable experience. That's how I got back into accountancy after several years in recruitment. 

Thanks (1)
avatar
By Sherman Holter
27th Mar 2014 17:46

@andy.partridge : Now it comes into focus

Ah Andy, now it comes into focus.

I thought it odd that one would defend recruitment consultants and, now I see your history, all is explained.

On the other side of the coin, likewise, my comment wasn't disinterested either.  This is because my ego was damaged by my not being put forward for jobs for which I clearly felt qualified.

I felt that the recruiters were depriving their client an excellent opportunity : that of employing ME.

Kind regards.

Thanks (3)
Replying to penelope pitstop:
avatar
By andy.partridge
27th Mar 2014 17:54

You might have been right

Sherman Holter wrote:

I felt that the recruiters were depriving their client an excellent opportunity : that of employing ME.

 

You might have been right but you would never have known the written (and unwritten) brief the consultant had been given or how (more?) suitable the competition was. 
Thanks (0)
avatar
By andy.partridge
29th Mar 2014 14:18

Real world

Edit: @SThornton

It's been shown that, even now, people with 'English sounding names' fare better in the jobs market. That was also my experience in recruitment. You can imagine how much 'age discrimination' there is, some of it unconscious some of it a well-meaning commercial decision.

It's a bit like thinking that having a speed limit of 30 mph means that no one will exceed it. To advertise a job vacancy that doesn't exist is against the law, but your claim that an agency you use does that doesn't seem to have put you off them.

I think it is better to give advice on how to improve the OP's chances than relying on the law.

Thanks (1)
keep calm and have a cuppa
By tbk
29th Mar 2014 10:57

I'm 50 and the agents are happy to put my CV forward, admittedly I am pitching myself at bookkeeper jobs rather than accountancy ones.

My DoB isn't on my CV, but my age is apparent from the dates for my schooling and uni qualifications.

I have found in the past if I see something advertised then I will phone the agency direct - if you can create a rapport with the agent you will stand out as a candidate.

You might have to adjust your expectations about who will employ you and in what role, but keep persevering and I am sure you will find the right slot eventually

Thanks (2)
Sarah Douglas - HouseTree Business Ltd
By sarah douglas
29th Mar 2014 21:12

I agree with Andy RE The Real World

Hi 

I had a couple of CV 's into my practice and they were  very good. At the time I did not have a position free both names where Asian.   A local firm asked me if I had any good CV 's and I said yes.  The minute I gave over the CV's both with Asian names but UK born their was an awkward silence neither where contacted. 

As it happens a part time slot has come up in my practice so I am now going to start one of them.  The day one of them phoned they had made 90 phonecalls and know one would even speak to him.  He is 1 module off fully qualified ACCA , 4 languages, 28 yrs old with good experience and is trying to make the move into practice.  

I would put your age and make it easier for employers.   If they are going to discriminate against older , non English names or whatever they will find away to do on the CV without any one being able to prove discrimination happened. 

 I have also seen a trend recently that  Directors are employing people if they are known to others they know provided they have the qualifications that are needed.   So pretty much they are asking people around them. 

 

 

Thanks (1)
avatar
By lumix70
29th Mar 2014 22:15

CV gap

I think if you explain in your CV that 4-year break was because you had to look after your father the agents and employers will be more understanding. Some mothers take longer breaks to look after kids and manage to find jobs when kids go to school.

If you still have your qualification you must have completed annual CPD requirements so your accounting knowledge would be more or less up to date. If so it is better to apply for qualified roles.

imho, the less skilled the role the higher the competition. I have recently received a reply to my application for a qualified Finance Manager job saying that they received over 140 applications. I imagine for accounts assistant jobs recruiters/employers may get over 300 applications.

Otherwise, I agree with most of recommendations:

- apply to industries you have worked before, especially for the jobs advertised through recruiters

- apply directly to employers. With my non-English name and accent I get more interviews from direct applications to employers.

- register at Linkedin. A lot of recruiters and employers post jobs and look for candidates there.

- another useful website is www.indeed.co.uk. It allows to register and save your CV and quickly apply to some jobs. It collects jobs from various websites based on your search criteria. So you can see if the same job is advertised with more than one location it is most likely a sham.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By MDK45
30th Mar 2014 08:46

I think its a terrible shame that agencies wield so much power and the system only benefits those with structured careers with no breaks. I certainly noticed after 40 that agencies weren't ringing me so I gave up ringing them. I decided to wrestle control back from them, I now do mixtures of work from home, remote working for companies i have got to know and I also got a practising certificate and do private work for individuals albeit passing up more complicated stuff to the 'better' practise people. This suits my lifestyle better, more time with kids whilst wife has busy career, more in control as well.

Thanks (0)
Share this content

Related posts