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Am I the most stupid accountant in britain today?

Am I the most stupid accountant in britain today?

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CRM calamityPost with the Most 2008

I have recently taken on a new client and agreed a fee of £2,500 + VAT. They are extremely happy with this fee, as their last accountant was ripping them off (this would be putting it mildly).
However, having now done most of the work I realise that I have overestimated slightly, and consider that £2,100 + VAT would be a fairer fee. I will be seeing them tomorrow and intend to reduce the fees.
I tend to take a longer view of things and don't believe in making a quick buck in the short term.
My question is: am i the most stupid accountant in britain today (ie voluntarily giving away £400) or am I too generous for my own good?
how many would behave in a similar fashion?

anon

Replies (62)

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By Anonymous
30th Jan 2008 11:22

James you are funny
James that one has got to be the biggest wind up today.

Accountants are in business to make LOTS of money thats how we all afford our nice plush offices, our big houses, our flash cars...not in business you ARE JOKING!

Anyway that just brightened my day, must get on and charge some more huge fees - kids school fees will be due soon after all.

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By Anonymous
30th Jan 2008 11:21

Re making profits/losses on jobs
When asked for a fixed fee I would never quote what I thought was unreasonable and I certainly wouldn't take advantage of those that make life easier for me or pay well.

What I do now agree with is that when I expected a job to take so long and managed to do it faster than expected why should I not take the benefit when I would take the loss if the situation was reversed. What is a profit on a job anyway? An hourly rate is not a scientific cost, it's what the market accepts to pay - what am I supposed to take as salary/profit in a year, how do I guarantee what hours I will have work for? I definitely do undercharge based on what I charge per hour and what I was charged out at in practice.

I have no doubt that some of those now criticising me will be charging their clients far more than I am in the first place.

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By Anonymous
30th Jan 2008 10:14

Jason,
...but the poster did not exceed his fixed price, and the client fulfilled their part of the bargain.
I'm not an advocate of Fixed pricing particularly - but when you do fix a price and agree it with the client, why should you feel guilty when you make a decent profit? Its as if you're saying 'I'm sorry that my years of study for professional qualifications, continuing CPD and overall ability has enabled me to do a good job for you at the price agreed - have some money back'

Do you regularly refund money to clients when you spend an hour less on a job? We're are 'selling', to a certain extent, 'knowledge' (!) and this has a value to a client
I do not accept that anyone in this profession (accountancy, tax) can honestly say that do not price work, either hourly or at a fixed price, without reference to previous successful pricing structures, for a particular client or your whole client base.

Are you that transparent - to me that means that your clients must know what 'profit' your making from them to accept whether or not your price is reasonable. Or is transparency agreeing a fee and sticking to it - which is my point.

Must finish last Tax Returns today!!! SUPER PROFITS!!! (only joking! - these are my least profitable laggard clients)

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By Jason Dormer
30th Jan 2008 09:38

Mirror Man
Sometimes it is better to swim against the tide and to stand out.

I am not interested in what every business is doing, I have my own mindset and am happy to go against the grain.

Of course you need to make a profit, but I prefer to make a profit from ALL clients, not some at the expense of others.

If you have a fixed price agreement then you define the scope of the agreement and the respective responsibilities of both parties. If those responsibilities are not met by the client, resulting in increased time then you bill the extra and still make your profit.

In this instance then I would guess that the OP spent much less time than he first thought as a result of the unanticipated systems and cooperation of the client and therefore priced it incorrectly in the first place and is simply making an adjustment the other way, whilst still retaining his desired profit level.

A fixed price does not always have to be set in stone - if the terms are not met, or exceeded, by either party then it can and should be adjusted, and that fact should be included in the FPA.

There has to be incentive for client co-operation and responsibility, I simply do not buy into the argument that you win some you lose some. I'm personally am only interested in win-win engagements and this belief seems to work very well for me, and gives me the profit I require, the service my clients require, and is price transparant.

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By Anonymous
29th Jan 2008 23:09

What is it with accountants.....??
We're in business to make a profit!!
Example, when you go to the petrol station, Esso are offering you a fixed price. You agree to pay it when you fill up. You agree the bargain. They make a profit - you receive the fuel.
No forecourt attendant has ever run out to me as I'm driving off to say that, 'actually,we managed to buy a few barrels of oil cheaper this week and here's a tenner as a refund!' Or 'we overestimated the overheads this week - and we feel bad about it, here's some cash'. Why would they? - we've agreed to buy - and they've sold it to us.

This query isn't about ethics, as some have argued - its about pricing your whole business model to make a profit. Jason, EVERY business subsidises profits and losses across its clients or customers - if you don't make a profit on one job, if you're going to survive, you have to make sure to make a profit out of the next one - thats the REAL world.

'Anon' isn't stupid - he's done a nice, kind thing, BUT I personally feel he was swayed in this case by non-business motives.

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By Grant Adams
29th Jan 2008 20:37

Rachel
If I were the client, I would accept that, by instructing an accountant on a fixed fee basis, the fee is never going to exactly equal their costs. I might win, I might lose. For the benefit of knowing exactly what I am going to pay when the job is done, that is the chance I am happy to take.

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By Anonymous
29th Jan 2008 19:06

If the shoe were on the other foot...
You want your driveway done - a reputable guy quotes you a price (not the cheapest, but not the dearest) & says it will take 2 days. You are happy with that. He makes good time & finishes in one & a half days & does a very good job.

Do you expect him to reduce his price? Would you still recommend him?

I'd say - No & Yes.

End of story.

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By AnonymousUser
29th Jan 2008 16:59

If I were a client...
I'd be horrified if my accountant made a profit from the work they did for me. Don't they know they're running an accountancy practice, not a business!!

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By Jason Dormer
29th Jan 2008 16:38

Rachel
Your last para seems to advocate that you take the money from this client to balance up the losses from FPA's on the others.

One question:

How would you feel if you were the client and became aware that you were subsidising the losses from other clients?

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By Anonymous
29th Jan 2008 10:47

Well I've had my mind changed
Initially I agreed with "am I stupid" that if I had unintentionally over-quoted would be happy to charge less than the fixed quote and show honesty.

But the discussion really has changed my mind. It is true if it took longer than expected we would not be able to charge more. It is true that there is no guarantee you will be referred as someone who is honest rather than someone cheap. Clients are always trying to beat us down on price, quibbling about the fee because they half prepared their accounts (with mistakes that needed ticking up) and paying late. I guess we do need to take advantage when we have agreed a fixed fee that at the time of fixing seemed fair. We're often wasting time when clients have intentionally mislead us as to the work invovled and usually losing time (and an unwelcome client) in the process.

Often we under-value ourselves. Fees are a very tricky area and more clients want fixed fees. I think most of us tend to lose out with fixed fees so we have to take avantage of those that are beneficial and shouldn't feel guilty as long as we didn't deliberately over-budget.

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By skylarking
29th Jan 2008 09:57

Dave, you are spot on!
Just in case anyone didn't see it:

The client is happy with the price!
If you deliver and meet their expectations, they will be happy with the service.

If they are happy with both, they will refer you as an accountant who provides a good service at a fair price.

If you give them such a large discount, they will recommend you as before and mention to their friends that you cut your price. Their friends may (will?) expect a price cut.

Do NOT be fooled into believing that giving a client a discount will result in MORE referrals. It is good service that results in more referrals. Giving a discount means that you could end up picking up clients who are price sensitive.

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By Anonymous
29th Jan 2008 09:36

But Glenn
The client is happy with the price!

If you deliver and meet their expectations, they will be happy with the service.

If they are happy with both, they will refer you as an accountant who provides a good service at a fair price.

If you give them such a large discount, they will recommend you as before and mention to their friends that you cut your price. Their friends may (will?) expect a price cut.

Do NOT be fooled into believing that giving a client a discount will result in MORE referrals. It is good service that results in more referrals. Giving a discount means that you could end up picking up clients who are price sensitive.

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By MiddletonG
28th Jan 2008 22:27

Smart move!
As a new partitioner in the colonies (Canada) I've seen far too many cases of ineptitude & greed by follow accountants. I left the corporate world to avoid this behaviour.

I've frequently bill at lower rates yet still make a decent living & I sleep well at night. I always try to pass on a portion the savings from my skills (done quicker & more accurately) to ensure clients see the our value.

What will happen is your clients (at least the "A" clients) will stay loyal & gladly & frequently refer you . So you may have given up £400, but it will pay dividends.

My clients always know I put their interests first. It's always easier to keep an existing client than find a new one.

Short term thinking leads to long term pain.

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By Hamishxero
27th Jan 2008 19:31

Reduce you fee??
Personally I think you are crazy, unless you are trying to sell something else to that client, like a referral. I would be interested to know if you achieved your time saving through the hard work of your client, OR the systems, knowledge and technology you have developed to build efficiency into your practice? Accounting costs are all about perception, if the client is happy and tells their friends you are great, then what do you care? You are not over charging, you are meeting expectation. If you wanted to exceed expectation, then do the job a week earlier than originally agreed, but still charge them the same agreed fee....

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By accountant78
19th Jan 2008 11:46

Add Value?
If you have an issue with charging the full amount you could give the client something else that they are not expecting such as some general business advice or a systems review etc.

The client would then think that you were great and you get your full fee.

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Euan's picture
By Euan MacLennan
19th Jan 2008 11:35

Promotional expense
There is clearly no contractual or even moral requirement to charge less than the agreed fixed fee.

You should regard any reduction as a promotional expense for the reasons given by Shaun. Your measure of the "excess" profit may not be accurate as it is based on a charge out rate that may be innaccurate, but it serves as a guide to the maximum you might spend for promoting your services. Again, I agree with Shaun that a reduction of £150 would be appropriate. The particular client is not impressed by the size of the reduction, provided that it is not a paltry amount (say, less than £100) - it is the fact that you did not charge the full agreed fee which will stick in his mind. Because of that, he will think that you are a good accountant and will recommend you to other potential clients. If, in a future year, you find that the fee you have agreed does not cover the time you have had to spend, the client will remember and be prepared to pay you an extra amount.

And you will also have pocketed excess profits of £250 this time!

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By Anonymous
18th Jan 2008 18:42

On the other hand
To answer the question what would you do if you'd under quoted - ask for more?

A fixed fee is a fixed fee, and I think it undermines your creditability if then seek to increase and equally reduce the fee.

Accountants have a nasty habit of forgetting they are in business - what other business would issue a refund - not many that make money.

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By theedges
18th Jan 2008 18:03

I would stick to the fee
I agree with those who say 'you win some, you lose some'. Maybe the next client will be of the 'pesky' variety who likes nothing better than ringing/writing/emailing once a week when totally unnecessary. You can hardly double the fee once you realise what he is going to be like. I always stick to my quotes, but it is hard to get them spot on for a new client anyway.

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By shaunmcguinness
18th Jan 2008 18:01

i'm in the same position
I have a similar situation where a clients fixed fee is too generous!
I intend to reduce the fee by a nominal £150 but believe I will gain more than this from him telling other people. And I will ask for a referral a few months after this too.

How often do you hear of anyone saying "my accountant REDUCED my fee"

Great PR and great karma;)

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By accountant78
18th Jan 2008 17:54

Take the rough with the smooth
Charge the agreed fee and you won't be so concerned about charging for the odd extra such as a mortgage reference or tax query in the future.

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By AnonymousUser
19th Jan 2008 20:16

I think you need to be careful
think carefully about the reasons for the discount. sometimes with new clients the full circumstances do not become immediately apparent.
If this is the case you need to explain to the client the reason for the reduction, otherwise they will think you were possibly overcharging initially.

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By Anonymous
19th Jan 2008 13:45

Increased referrals?
Surely if you deliver a great service at the price agreed, you will get referrals.

There is no guarantee that reducing your fee will increase the referral rate.

Unless you plan on turning it into a USP!

I think there is a great danger of you being known as "the accountant who gives discounts".

Cue a client referred from this lady - you quote £2,500 to the new client, the new client knows that you gave "a discount" to the referror - would they get a discount? Or if it took longer than expected, would you charge them more?

As I suggested before, treat it as a contingency.

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By notmy realname
19th Jan 2008 11:57

£250
I would send a cheque back for £250.

Probably be the best £250 you have ever spent in terms of building trust with the client and opens the door fully next time there is an over-run.

It doesn't have to be much to be noted.

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By IanRiley
24th Jan 2008 10:48

Stupid or right?
Well done Anon

You've done the right thing, something which it seems, disturbingly, the majority would not have been prepared to do.

Personally for a new client, I give a quote based on my estimate of the time it is going to take. If having done the work it is clear that it took more time than anticipated, I stick to the quote and say that it took more time than anticipated and that next year (given the same circumstances) the bill will be £x more, alternatively there may be better ways for the client to keep the books ect so that the price can be kept lower.
If the work took less time than anticipated, then the bill gets lowered.

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By AnonymousUser
23rd Jan 2008 15:04

Gut reaction
Reducing your fee is the right thing to do.

Building a relationship with your client is a long-term process. In the future, if you need to increase your fee because the work took longer than anticipated, they will believe you.

Remember also, that they ditched the last accountant for exactly the same thing and they will be please that you have been honest.

A promoter, that is a customer who recommends you to their friends, will build your business. Imagine the conversation “You never guess what happened to me today, my accountant reduced his fee”

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Peter Ball MD at williamgerrard.co.uk
By peterball
23rd Jan 2008 14:52

No It must be me!
I think you are ripping off your client! I have never charged any client more than £2000! I charge most clients less than £1000.00!! Many of my clients are charged less than £500.00!!
I do tell my clients that I am probably the least expensive accountant in the UK. ! Now they will believe me! I still make a good profit, but just enough to make a living, 98% of new clients come to me from recommendation, so that helps. I do not need to advertise, so save on advertising costs.
Is there any other accountant charging such low fees?
My basic starting fee for doing a self employed sole trader self assessment tax return is £85.00 plus vat. can anyone beat this?

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By jonspe
23rd Jan 2008 16:13

Am I the most stupid accountant in britain today?
I would charge the £2,500 but advise the client that you are prepared to charge the same amount for the following 1 or 2 years, subject to an exceptional charge in the event of unforeseen circumstances at a specified rate per hour.

That way you should get the best of both worlds. You should have a satisified client who should be happy to budget at least one cost with some certainty, and you have a buffer to offset against any cost inflation.

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By kerpang
23rd Jan 2008 18:04

You should not remain anon
Hi Anon,

I think you should put in your contact details/URL as a fair accountant like you would have attracted lots of interest !

I suppose it all depends on people, some people never appreciate even if you are fair to them.

Some will, and to thouse, £400 is well refunded. Once the trust is there, if you had to charge more fees because the work is more complex then initially received, you would be well received.


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By arunpvr
23rd Jan 2008 17:35

Long Term
Anon

This gesture will ensure more introductions from your existing clients, as your clients will look upon you as a fair guy a recommennd your services. Your £400 forgone may come back to you by way of another introduction worth £2,100!!! Also perhaps you should consider our services which will enable you to grow your business without worrying about staff. visit our site www.giinfosys.com for more information.
rgds. Arun

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By pauljohnston
23rd Jan 2008 18:18

Now you have read all the coments you are no wiser
Well done in opening a great debate and also well done to all those different comments.

So here is mine. It has been suggested that it is good PR to reduce and tell the client. Would the client think that all though you are a good sort you are not running your business very well because you were not able to quote accurately?

If she tells her friends will this mean they will all look for a reduction?

If you conscience feels that some recompense is necessary I feel the suggestion to give something free in return is the way forward. How about bookkeeping software. What ever you do make it look as if it is something special for new clients.

Good Luck what ever you decide and do let us know.

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By dahowlett
23rd Jan 2008 18:16

Angst
I'm amazed at the level of angst described in the comments, even though the majority seem to favour retaining the fee at the quoted level. Value is subjective but not to the point where it cannot be evaluated.

I suspect that what is happening here is that having discovered the predecessor was 'ripping the client off' they now feel as though they are at risk of being considered in the same light.

Wrong way to look at this.

Each client relationship is different and it is therefore part relationship and part service that people pay for. They don't pay for your time, they don't care about that. They care about what was done and whether that represents good value.

If you can demonstrate for example that you have saved them money or that you can help them earn a better profit then you are doing your job.

Never feel guilty about doing a good job and being rewarded accordingly. Goodness knows there are enough cowboys out there as it is,

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By sjmaccounting
23rd Jan 2008 19:50

do the honest thing.....
obtained a new ltd co client yesterday, simple cash book verification/bank recy and then straight into final accounts/corp tax comps.

quoted my standard £500+vat package fee (includes self assessment on the director/shareholder, payroll and year end filing) - client extremely happy. when i analysed the previous yrs accounts he had been charged £650+vat by his previous accountant when the company was virtually dormant and only turned over £900!

I will reduce my fee and also consider that the £150 or so reduction will be well worth it in the form of the new clients introductions over the coming months, not to mention this client's ongoing relationship with my firm.

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By skylarking
23rd Jan 2008 21:07

Some assumption
Many of those in support of 'stupid' seem to think that it is a fantastic piece of self-promotion to discount the fixed fee on the basis that client will blow their trumpet in the city centre and get heaps of new clients. Uh?

My view as posted earlier is that it is money down the drain, but indulging the supporters for a moment, shouldn't they consider
1. the quantity and type of contacts the client has, and
2. how influential the client is (with said contacts).

OK, twist my arm and there may be an exceptional case to merit the discount, but surely in most circumstances it's futile. It might make you feel good for a moment, but would your partner/children thank you for giving away their pocket money to a virtual stranger?

So, 'stupid', you may not be the most stupid accountant. There appear to be quite a few vying for the title.

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By Jason Dormer
23rd Jan 2008 23:33

Andy
Im not sure why im bothering to answer that at this hour but your abrasive post irritated me.

Of course these factors have to be taken into account if you are considering it purely from a marketing point of view.

What also has to be taken into account is the principles of the original poster who clearly wants to charge a fair and reasonable price which satisfies both him and the client.

This is clearly a man who lives and works by values and good for him in not taking the option that the majority in every trade and profession would take.

I personally used a firm of architects recently, we agreed on a price, they done the work (excellent job) and then under no obligation whatsover they discounted the price by 20% as the job did not take as long as expected. Will I refer them? Yes. Will I use them again? Yes. Will I remember them every time I want an architect? Yes Do I want to deal with people who can do business like this? Yes. Did I consider why they got the original quoute wrong? Yes and their explanation made sense.

Personally I think that the best advice given on this thread to date has been to provide an additional value adding service to the client.

I want one of those T-shirts "I'm with stupid"

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By AnonymousUser
18th Jan 2008 12:33

it is a woman I am dealing with,
and maybe I am a little bit gullible when it comes to dealing with the fairer sex.
At the end of the day, I enjoy a good relationship with all my clients and I like to be able to look them straight in the eye when I am handing them an invoice for services rendered. on that basis I will go ahead with the fee reduction.

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By AnonymousUser
25th Jan 2008 14:37

Personally, I never give discounts
as I agree fixed fees with clients and both parties are happy with this arrangement.
However, in the case outlined, I can see an argument for giving a reduction, but then again we do not know the full facts of the situation.
If the accounts and tax work proved to be straightforward, then presumably a good profit has already been made, so giving a discount would seem the right thing to do.
On the other hand, there may be an ulterior motive which has not been disclosed.

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By rdrtaxwizard
25th Jan 2008 14:00

am I stupid
If the fee estimate was based on chargeable time, then it is right to reduce it to costed time.

However if it was a fixed fee quote for the job, the costed time is irrelevant. The enquirer says that the client was happy with the fee quote so to reduce the fee in those circumstances would be unnecessary and not in accordance with what had been contracted.

It is becoming more and more common for accountants to charge on a value basis rather than costed time. In this case the client's perception of the value was clearly positive.

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By Anonymous
25th Jan 2008 10:49

Here here Dave!
I with you on that one Dave.

I am one of the business people!

Good job were not all the same.

'Stupid' (that sounds so awful wish you had a name) my last word do what YOU feel is right.

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By Anonymous
25th Jan 2008 09:42

Carol
Firstly I am not from theaccountantscoach.com!

Secondly, I did try putting a reply together, which is obviously based on my opinion, but after I had put a few bullet points differentiating the two groups, I considered that it may offend some of the contributors to this excellent thread. So I’m leaving it at that.

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By AnonymousUser
24th Jan 2008 10:00

further clarification
if I can clarify the situation it might help to draw the matter to a close.

1) it has nothing to do with referrals or marketing. these matters are totally irrelevant.

2) the fee quoted for the work was for 2 years accounts & tax. There was additional work also. However, it turned out that the additional work was completed in very good time and was not as much as originally envisaged. I had budgeted £500 for this, but this would have been way over the top given the time actually spent.

3) the matter is now a fait accompli as the dirty deed has been done.

4)Riz Wasti made a comment about the lady having big boobs[***]. He must be psychic, as indeed that is the case. However, again this is irrelevant, as I am more of a leg man than a boob man.

and finally, I guess this post is attracting so many replies as it must be the first time it has ever happened in the history of accountancy in the uk, ie an accountant giving a discount to a client. I guess there is a first time for everything (Only joking! Looking at the replies on here there are many who would have done the same thing).

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By Anonymous
24th Jan 2008 11:42

I think

some of the responses here prove that there are accountants who are accountants and there are accountants who are business men.

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By Anonymous
24th Jan 2008 10:42

.
Andy - fair do's, for me it was that time of night at that time of the month at that time of the year.

This has been an interesting thread, lots of opinions and like an ar$ehole everyone on AWeb seems to have one.

Despite the wide range of opinions there is no 'right' or 'wrong' answer. Only the OP can choose what fits in best with his own thinking and I see that he has already done so.

.

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By rizwasti
23rd Nov 2011 23:12

1

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David Winch
By David Winch
24th Jan 2008 10:23

Fixed fees

Somewhat off topic, most of the work I do as a forensic accountant in criminal cases is funded by the Legal Services Commission (LSC) - it used to be referred to as "legal aid".

The LSC are encouraging experts such as myself to quote fixed fees. Being a helpful fellow I quoted, let's say, a fixed fee of £900 for a particular piece of work.

The LSC response was that they would agree the fee, but only when I told them what my hourly rate was so that they could confirm it was not excessive!

Well I said, it's a fixed fee. So if the work takes me 6 hours it is £150 an hour. If it takes me 9 hours it is £100 an hour. If it takes me 7.5 hours it is £120 per hour.

Back came an approval for "7.5 hours at £120 per hour". So much for a fixed fee !

David
www.AccountingEvidence.com

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By Anonymous
24th Jan 2008 09:47

What's the REAL reason for the discount?
Going back to the start of this debate, anon (assuming this is the original poster) stated that the client (they? in his question) is a woman. He seems to be a man, and admits to be gullible in dealing with the fairer sex.
Um.....
Seems to me you can dress it up (excuse the innuendo) as good PR, or marketing, or being a nice guy, or even some would say, stupid, but he should ask himself 'would I be planning the give the fee back if the client was a six foot 4, 18 stone, heavily bearded fisherman, who stank of haddock'. If the answer is no, then then there is an emotional not business reason for the gesture.

Personally, I try and make clients happy. if I 'estimate' a fee, I try to come in on target - if its a little lower I make sure the client knows I'm under estimate. Good PR. If I fix a fee - its fixed. Both parties get what they bargained for. On a £2.5k annual job, at some time in the future you are going to have a problem which may cost and you will have a problem billing the broad, sorry, woman, sorry, client. What will you do then?

I had a client that I quoted a fixed fee for. Later she didn't want to pay because the problem wasn't as complicated as it first appeared. I said - but if it had been more complicated and cost more - would she have accepted the extra. No she said. It's a FIXED FEE! Its fixed both ways. However, I then explained that to be fair, I had actually done more work than agreed under the fixed fee agreement (ie an additional task) and eventually she was happy. Some people, though, just don't get it.

Perhaps the poster would keep us updated on the new clients that come by her referrals.

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By skylarking
24th Jan 2008 09:42

Delusional
It would appear some people are . . . .!
The 'PR' bit is grossly over-rated. You don't get brownie points because you admit to your client that you can't price a job properly. Provide a great service. That's what sticks in their mind forever, and that's long after they've forgotten what the price even was.

Jason - Sorry, mate, but I was in an abrasive mood myself. Still am, actually. It's that time of the month and that month of the year.

Dennis - Oh Dennis . . . . . silly self-promoting Dennis. Let's all rush to look at your website.

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By ajbiddle
24th Jan 2008 09:05

Stick to your fee
You agreed a fixed fee with your client - they were happy and so were you, so what's the problem with actually charging it? Pricing a job is difficult enough - you will have plenty of clients over the course of time that you lose out on, take this gain whilst you can.

A couple of other points to other posters.

To those who suggest now offering a 'free' value adding service on top - if you give something free to this client now how will you ever get them to pay for additional services in the future? - people do not value that which they get for free.

As regards the PR bit of reducing the fee - I think you have already done your good PR job by winning the client, giving them a fixed fee they were happy with and finally getting the job done in good time to a good standard. Do you really want this client reffering all her contacts to you because you're cheap? Clients who join you on price will eventually leave you on price.

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By listerramjet
24th Jan 2008 09:03

I would like to know
why you think the last accountant was ripping his client off? Was it simply because he was charging a larger fee than you feel able to justify? What was the quality of his work like, and have you taken that into account?

There seems to be a lot of emotion in the postings to this question, which is good, but perhaps some more facts might improve the debate!

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By dahowlett
24th Jan 2008 08:11

Well said
@Andy - I'm sorry but you're takling twaddle.

@Jason - well said. It provides another perspective on the topic I'd not thought through and I think you are right.

I have expanded thoughts on this at my site, driven by the recent crop of dross I've reviewed.

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By Anonymous
23rd Jan 2008 17:02

What to bill?
After reading all the comments to this post, you have probably spent another couple of hours 'on this client' so I would bill the whole amount

;-)

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