Anonymising addresses in FTT decisions

Why bother when you can find it on Google?

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https://www.rightmove.co.uk/house-prices/details/england-72684611-129227...

Martin Lynch & Anor v The Commissioners for HMRC - Find case law - The National Archives

https://caselaw.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ukftt/tc/2024/350

Replies (8)

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Stepurhan
By stepurhan
03rd May 2024 16:40

This question would make a lot more sense if you said where in the decision the address was anonymised and how you went about finding it anyway.

As it stands, without wading through the entire decision, it is hard to tell whether poor anonymisation in the decision is at fault or not.

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Replying to stepurhan:
By Ruddles
03rd May 2024 16:53

stepurhan wrote:

This question would make a lot more sense if you said where in the decision the address was anonymised and how you went about finding it anyway.


And why
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Replying to stepurhan:
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By FactChecker
03rd May 2024 17:08

After one of my (in)famous speed-reads I can't discern any place where an address has been obviously anonymised/hidden ... but I will say that having photos of the site (house, outbuildings and land) certainly makes it easier and more interesting to follow the text findings.
So thanks for the addition of illustrations.

Wholly unrelated, but it also serves to reinforce my full-blown scepticism when it comes to aligning the concept of truth with what Estate Agents will tell you:
* 18 vs 22 acres was quite pertinent in the case, but agents say it's 20 acres;
* main heading says 5 bedrooms, but 'key features' says 7 + master bedroom;
* but my favourite (cop-out) is "Flexible Accommodation"!

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Replying to FactChecker:
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By Justin Bryant
03rd May 2024 17:27

"24. The brochure states:

“This beautiful family home …occupies a superb position within the pretty… village of W…. It boasts twenty-two acres of stunning grounds and enjoys magnificent views across the Vale of Aylesbury… .”

In the good old days, judges were more than happy to name the addresses and you would sometimes even get hordes of avid law students visiting famous addresses from well-known property law cases.

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Replying to Justin Bryant:
By Ruddles
03rd May 2024 17:34

I’d hardly call that a deliberately anonymised address. Nothing more than an abbreviated extract from the brochure.

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Replying to Justin Bryant:
By Ruddles
03rd May 2024 18:55

Justin Bryant wrote:

In the good old days, judges were more than happy to name the addresses .


And I’m sure the judge would have done so in this case if he had considered it to be at all relevant. If he had felt it necessary to anonymise the address I’m pretty sure he would have made a better job of it. Some people do like to make something out of absolutely nothing.
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By Justin Bryant
03rd May 2024 17:42

I love a bit of irony me i.e. how some anonymous people here don't know what anonymizing is.

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Replying to Justin Bryant:
By Ruddles
03rd May 2024 18:49

But you’re not anonymous, Justin, so your comment makes no sense.

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