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Bribery Act questions

Bribery Act questions

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I'm going to be speaking to a forensic services expert in the next few days and I'd like to put a few 'frequently asked questions' to him.

One of the things he does is run workshops on the Briberby Act. Are there any areas of this legislation you'd like clarification on? If so, please post your questions below.

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By Phil Rees
08th Sep 2010 16:06

How much will you pay me to ask a question?

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By thomas34
08th Sep 2010 18:48

Briberby - I'm prepared to ask the first question for nothing

But will require some inducement for second and subsequent questions.

I've always wondered how a question becomes "frequently asked". I suppose in due course we can all pay a fee to be regulated under the aforementioned Act and carry out risk assessments of all clients who spend money on entertaining subject of course to a preset de minimis level. I think I've lost the will to live.

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By cymraeg_draig
08th Sep 2010 22:54

Bribery pays ..............usually.

The prisoner felt he didn’t have a prayer of beating a murder conviction. So, shortly before the jury was to retire, he bribed one of the jurors to find him guilty of manslaughter, not murder.

The jury was out for days, after which they returned a verdict of manslaughter. Cornering the bribed juror, the prisoner whispered.

“Thanks a million! However did you manage it?”

“It wasn’t easy, admitted the bribed juror, . . . “All the others wanted to acquit you.”

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By Gina Dyer
09th Sep 2010 12:04

Haha!

Well if nothing else you've given me some good belly laughs, so thank you! Did I ask a silly question? Is there nothing anyone wants to know about the Bribery Act? How about fraud questions in general?

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By thomas34
09th Sep 2010 17:26

Gina

On a more serious note it seems that a Government that has vowed to cut red tape is trying to do exactly the opposite and to mend something that's not broken. The fact that the present law which I think may date from 1916 and is old doesn't mean that prosecutions can't be brought.

I wouldn't encourage anybody who intends to run workshops (free or otherwise) by attending because they will surely be a precursor to courses which we'll be asked to pay for. Having been forced to spend several hundred pounds on MLR matters (with no benefit to anybody) I can see another fiasco happening. My earlier post was partly serious.

We deal with forms of bribery every day - cashbacks at supermarkets, free bets at the bookies etc. We call them incentives, commissions or something else. I can see this idea developing into an industry with specialist consultants springing up everywhere.

In any case, if it's in the national interest to turn a blind eye (no names, no pack drill), a prosecution won't ensue.

Tom Egerton

 

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By cymraeg_draig
09th Sep 2010 19:23

Grey areas

We deal with forms of bribery every day - cashbacks at supermarkets, free bets at the bookies etc. We call them incentives, commissions or something else. I can see this idea developing into an industry with specialist consultants springing up everywhere.

In any case, if it's in the national interest to turn a blind eye (no names, no pack drill), a prosecution won't ensue.

Tom Egerton

 

Posted by thomas34 on Thu, 09/09/2010 - 17:26

 

 

That actually is a very good question. What is the difference between an inducement (legal) and a bribe (illegal). It's about as grey as the difference between avoidance and evasion. An accountant will tell you one thing, a tax inspector another.

There was once an arguement in the legal profession about perjury. Technically every defendant who pleads not guilty and who is subsequently convicted, has committed perjury.  Should they all be prosecuted?

 

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