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buy to let property in ltd co

Do limited companies pay the second property stamp duty surcharge>?

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Afternoon all, what a lovely day!

When buying a new buy to let property, if this is purchased via a limited company, is the company liable to pay the stamp duty surcharge? Thank you!

Replies (15)

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By Tim Vane
27th Mar 2017 15:10

You should talk to your accountant who can give you all the information and identify the advantages and disadvantages.

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By Duggimon
27th Mar 2017 15:17

No, there is no extra stamp duty charge for a limited company buying its second property.

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Replying to Duggimon:
By Ruddles
27th Mar 2017 15:39

You might want to re-think that - or make it clear that you are being facetious.

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Replying to Ruddles:
By Duggimon
27th Mar 2017 16:44

I 100% stand by the comment exactly as I made it, the Stamp Duty charge for a limited company buying its second property is the same as it is for its first.

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Replying to Duggimon:
By Ruddles
27th Mar 2017 17:02

"This comment is provided for general information only. It is not intended to amount to advice on which you should rely [unless said advice is to sod off]. You must obtain professional or specialist advice before taking, or refraining from, any action on the basis of the content of this comment.

I make no representations, warranties or guarantees, whether express or implied, that the content of this comment is accurate, complete or up-to-date - and is in fact more likely than not to be a load of b*llocks."

I agree - the Stamp Duty charge for a limited company buying its second property is the same as it is for its first - zero.

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By Justin Bryant
27th Mar 2017 15:40

Interesting how the person giving the above wrong answer could he sued for negligence. See:

https://www.lawgazette.co.uk/news/cautionary-tale-on-free-advice-from-so...

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Replying to Justin Bryant:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
27th Mar 2017 15:48

Well, that is the death of Accounting Web, I for one will be stopping posting if it can be construed I owe a professional duty of care to the OP or all readers on here as a general class.

Maybe I need to from now on append a five page disclaimer at the foot of each of my posts.

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Replying to DJKL:
By Ruddles
27th Mar 2017 16:23

I will simply precede all future comments with:

"This comment is provided for general information only. It is not intended to amount to advice on which you should rely [unless said advice is to sod off]. You must obtain professional or specialist advice before taking, or refraining from, any action on the basis of the content of this comment.

I make no representations, warranties or guarantees, whether express or implied, that the content of this comment is accurate, complete or up-to-date - and is in fact more likely than not to be a load of b*llocks."

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Replying to Ruddles:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
27th Mar 2017 16:35

Quote:

- and is in fact more likely than not to be a load of b*llocks."

Is that one of these new technical terms introduced within FRS102?

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Replying to Justin Bryant:
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By Accountant A
27th Mar 2017 19:14

Quote:

Interesting how the person giving the above wrong answer could he sued for negligence. See:

https://www.lawgazette.co.uk/news/cautionary-tale-on-free-advice-from-so...

And, joking aside, that is a very sound reason for whoever runs this website to stop random members of the public registering to get free advice.

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By Jambo55
27th Mar 2017 15:50

I presume the answer is actually that the stampt duty surcharge is payable?

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Replying to Jambo55:
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By Accountant A
27th Mar 2017 19:04

Quote:

I presume the answer is actually that the stampt duty surcharge is payable?

No, no stamp duty surcharge applies.

(As above, this information should not be relied upon and you should seek advice from a suitably qualified professional who carries sufficient indemnity insurance to compensate you should the advice you receive prove to be incorrect or inappropriate. The value of investments can go down as well as up.)

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By JCresswellTax
27th Mar 2017 16:09

Do you even pay stamp duty on property?

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By schocca
27th Mar 2017 21:10

The only way to answer this question is to use Google to find the GOV.UK SDLT calculator - it's available, it's free and I suspect that for your case, accurate...

https://www.tax.service.gov.uk/calculate-stamp-duty-land-tax/#/intro

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Man of Kent
By Kent accountant
27th Mar 2017 23:08

"I make no representations, warranties or guarantees, whether express or implied, that the content of this comment is accurate, complete or up-to-date - and is in fact more likely than not to be a load of b*llocks."

How can I add that as my signature to all posts on AWeb?

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