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Career changing from teaching- am I crazy?

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I'm currently teaching languages at the secondary school level but want a complete career change at 30. I'm heavily considering accounting, but have a few concerns and I'm worried about starting down a long path only to change my mind in a few years! 

1. I haven't studied maths since GCSE (A*). I am really interested in personal finance and saving, but not so much with equations. Is there a lot of this? 

2. I have practically no accounting experience (some bookkeeping and cash office work a while ago- which I really enjoyed). All I have done is teaching... Will this hinder me in finding a job? I recently sent about 20 emails to accounting firms in the surrounding area asking for unpaid work experience/shadowing and only one responded, with a no. Will it be a constant uphill battle to find positions due to my non-accounting experience? 

If it matters, I am thinking of self-studying for the AAT qualification (as I can't get my foot in the door until I have started AAT) and then get an entry level job in an accounting firm and hopefully they would help me fund the ACCA/CIMA...? 

 

 

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By JoF
19th Jun 2019 23:22

Just answering your headline Q.....yes.

With all the HMRC shenanigans alone you would have to be stark raving bonkers to get into this game.

But then being a teacher at secondary level probably qualifies in the crazy stakes.

My motto, don't let anyone stop you doing what you really want to do.

I'm certainly glad I didn't do this from being 16, although that's based on the here and now nightmares! The days of loving this job are diminishing by the second

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By Alana
to JoF
21st Jun 2019 18:25

Can confirm- totally crazy!

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By AW71
19th Jun 2019 23:32

Don't do it. It's constant hassle thanks to HMRC in recent years. I'm only still doing it as I'm too old to do anything else but too young to retire.

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By JoF
to AW71
19th Jun 2019 23:39

Just retire, live in a tent - much less hassle!

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By AW71
to JoF
20th Jun 2019 00:00

So tempting!

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20th Jun 2019 02:14

In my considered opinion, everyone I have met in life has admitted to hating their jobs apart from a gardener I once met.

Then a year later she said she now hated her gardening job!

But I did notice in the news recently that a young teacher admitted to wanting to crash her car every time she drove to school each day. Is that how you feel?

That sounded too much like how I used to feel when I drove to work each morning to a firm of Chartered Accountants run by a mob of monsters, although the earlier years were glorious before the young partners took hold of the reins and ejected the old partners.

So, whatever job you choose in life, make sure you pick the right job you want to hate. Some jobs are hated more than others.

And accountancy is not as pleasurable as it used to be donkeys years ago.

"Frying pan, fire?"

I guess much will depend on who's running the accountancy outfit you join.

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By AW71
to penelope pitstop
20th Jun 2019 06:54

I enjoyed mine until recent years. But there has been a massive increase in needless red tape or changes, none of which I can see any benefit from. And all this from a party supposedly for smaller businesses.

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20th Jun 2019 09:09

Alana, you're not crazy and 30 is still pretty young for a career change. I teach ACCA and students have ranged from early 20s to their late 50s.

However, the above posts are very true. I enjoyed my career for the first 16 or so years but there has been so much red tape, HMRC issues and unhelpful rules coming in during the last few years that it has taken the joy away from the job.

If you do self-study AAT whilst in your current role, hopefully that will give you an idea of whether you would enjoy it before making the final decision to change. Also, keep your eye out for any free events for accountants - it will build your network and may be more successful than cold emails (I receive so many of these that I don't always have time to reply).

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20th Jun 2019 09:09

The maths is minimal, but you will find it very difficult to get a job with a firm because you will be completing against the kids you’ve been teaching who will be joining as low paid apprentices. They get £3.90 against your £8.21

Definitely self study AAT if you want to consider this world, but on its on it won’t get you a career.

Also, theres is also almost nothing about personal finance in accounting; you may wish to consider becoming a financial advisor. Again this is a long study route and difficult to break in to, but you can do it whilst still working if you are dedicated. A good place to start would be to look at http://www.newleafdistribution.co.uk and attend one of their open days. This is how I got going with financial Services whilst being an accountant.

Finally, I’d echo what others have said: accountancy is not what it once was. It’s not highly paid, it’s very stressful. Hmrc are not fit for their job. And clients do not value your work in anyway (with very occasional exceptions)

What ever you decide, good luck for the future.

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By Maslins
20th Jun 2019 09:16

You don't need to be great at maths to be a good accountant. Yes you need to have a good handle of numbers, but there's no integration/trigonometry/any of that jazz.

I've never been a teacher but know enough of them to know it's a sucky job, especially at the moment. However, it is relatively easy to get a job as a teacher (lots of demand, that isn't going anywhere, but people leaving the profession/not many wanting to join it). Seems you've already noticed the same isn't true of accountancy.

Unpaid work experience...you may think it's a complete gift, but it's a legal minefield for the company. Yes there's the element of are you actually an employee being paid well below the minimum wage, but it's also all the other crap. To do anything useful you'd be given access to lots of sensitive data. You therefore need to go (or should be put) through lots of training, BS as it may be, and the firm do various checks on you etc. More trouble than it's worth for the firm.

If you decide that you do want to pursue it, then my views would be:
- do make a start on AAT. It's less about the knowledge you'll learn, more about demonstrating your commitment to accounting (so potential employers less likely to think it's just your idea of the day and tomorrow you'll want to be a lawyer/architect).
- expect a hefty pay cut. I know teacher salaries aren't huge, and accounting salaries can be...but only for the skilled/experience. There are lots of wannabe trainees, and not many trainee roles. This is becoming an increasing problem IMHO, as more and more basic tasks that a junior would historically do are done automatically by software.
- give up on offering free work experience. Look for trainee job vacancies and go for those. Also no harm in sending off speculative applications to local firms who aren't advertising. Unlikely to get a high success rate, but there's always the chance your letter arrives at the right firm at just the right time for them.

https://www.chrismaslin.co.uk/uncategorized/tips-when-applying-for-train... this blog post gives my tips from the perspective of a small accounting recruiter. Best of luck if you do decide to go for it.

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20th Jun 2019 09:57

Before you start studying have a think about the options within the accountancy world - it's not just about accounts and auditing, there are whole worlds of tax functions (personal tax, VAT, employment taxes & payroll, etc.).

Think about your personal skills, as some roles have more or less people interaction. The ability to do numbers to a high level is not necessarily important for many of these roles. We have computers for the hardest numbers!

If you choose one of these other roles within the profession then the AAT qualification is not going to help you much. In many roles you can simply learn on the job and (be paid) to study alongside that.

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20th Jun 2019 10:42

Hello Alana. Could I please ask where you're based?

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By Alana
to dialm4accounts
21st Jun 2019 18:22

Hi,

I'm based in Haywards Heath but can travel anywhere from Brighton- London

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to Alana
24th Jun 2019 09:33

Hi Alana, we're based in Edinburgh but if you ever relocate up here, we'd be glad to hear from you. Best of luck with your decision.

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20th Jun 2019 10:59

Alana wrote:

I am really interested in personal finance and saving, but not so much with equations. Is there a lot of this? 

No idea what the training involves but have you considered becoming an Independent Financial Advisor?

Alternatively, perhaps a move into a "back office" function of a school - probably a large one - with a view to 'training up' as a bursar?

Income drop, in the short term at least, is going to happen whatever you choose.

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20th Jun 2019 11:12

Have you thought about a career in the armed forces. I've heard that killing people for a living is very cathartic.

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to Vile Nortin Naipaan
20th Jun 2019 12:44

With those sorts of thoughts you would be a hit in the US military. And with drone striking you can murder from a nice chair too. Funny hat on? bang! Look a bit like someone you suspect of doing bad things? Kill 'em and anyone standing within 20 meters, just incase it is them. Someone helping the wounded? Stick another one on the keen one who did the first aider course.

You would be a natural.

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to ireallyshouldknowthisbut
20th Jun 2019 15:07

Yes. People should remember to hesitate before expressing a view that's contrary to mine.

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By DJKL
to Vile Nortin Naipaan
20th Jun 2019 14:26

Well it certainly was for the Thebans.

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to DJKL
20th Jun 2019 15:06

Aren't they in that Zoo film?

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By DJKL
to Vile Nortin Naipaan
20th Jun 2019 15:25

Could not say as do not know the zoo film, then again I am somewhat behind the times re modern culture.(Two odd millenium it seems)

I was more concentrating of Aristotle's discourse on Tragedy in Poetics and say Antigone (An early gore fest production), two works I laboured through at university and vaguely recall writing a first year essay about that was not that enthusiastically received. (Alas missed really answering the question back then so nothing much has changed in the intervening years)

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By Ian Bee
20th Jun 2019 11:38

It's not crazy and I have known people do it, including a PE teacher when I was at school who left to train as a Chartered Accountant, and this was in about 1972.

I would echo the reservations made by others here. The job is not what it was and the admin and paperwork just to do anything is overwhelming (though teachers say the same thing).

One interesting line to follow if you are interested is to combine the two. There is a need for lecturers/presenters in the accounting profession at all levels from new trainees to experienced professionals. Quite often this is handed to partners and managers with no training and can be worse than useless. But if you have ever attended a course with an enthusiastic and committed presenter it makes all the difference. And the audience genuinely want to learn, and don't spend all day mocking other members of the class and making smart alec questions to the teacher.

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By JD
20th Jun 2019 14:47

In my humble experience, most people find the transition from public sector (who tend to be very well looked after, sick pay, pension, holidays and so on ) into the rather commercial world of the private sector a bit of a shock. Do it, but only for the right reasons and definitely not if you think it will be easier, has better benefits or if you think that dealing with numpty clients/HMRC is better than numpty kids.

No need to be really good at maths, just understand what the figures mean in the real world. I would suggest dusting down any technology skills you have. It has to be said, Ian has made a very good point - consider teaching accountancy as your route in.

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By DJKL
20th Jun 2019 14:44

If I were the OP I would consider ;

1. The march of AI, impact later on possible career?
2. Does accountancy have to be practice?

It is certainly doable, my older sister taught in schools into her thirties, had a break when her kids were small, went back to do substitute teaching and decided she wanted a career change and then picked up an HND in accounting and still works in finance for a local authority.

I have really no idea how bad teaching can be (despite my other half working in a school, initially as a classroom assistant) but would remind that it is easy to forget about the holidays (my other half finishes a week on Friday for six odd weeks) and the pension schemes (my other half can frolic into retirement next January on a decent final salary scheme)- in fact she career changed in her early forties from Investment Banking to education, a reverse route, albeit she could not get the teacher training qualification she wanted(to teach history/modern studies- first degree was History & Politics and at time no demand for History teachers).

I would think long and hard these days before leaving a public sector position, the grass is not always greener.

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By marks
20th Jun 2019 20:10

Personally I wouldnt do it.

From an employers viewpoint (which I am) in all honesty I wouldnt even consider you for any position.

I would have a good think about why you became and teacher in the first place and try to get back to that position.

I know that they say nowadays teaching is a stressful job but if you ask most people they say their job is stressful with their employer/clients asking them to do more and more.

Also think of the benefits you get as a teacher

1. Finish at 3.30/4pm
2. Dont work weekends (ok I know that you do exam marking and class pre work but even if you do 5 - 10 hours every week that would just take you to the standard 35-40 hours per week that most people work as a minimum full time)
3. 14 weeks (give or take) holidays a year plus the inservice days that they seem to have every month or so. So thats 70 days holidays v standard 30.
4. Good final pension
5. Wind down to holidays (my kids are due to finish in a couple of weeks - when I was it school the wind down was the last day when you got to bring games in. Now it seems the wind down starts 3 weeks before).

Then you have to consider you will have to retrain for 3 - 5 years plus all the study so can say bye bye to your social/family life over most of those years and have to take a massive salary cut (expect a starting salary of £9k - £11k as thats what school leavers get and thats who you would be up against). We have school leaver currently in her 2nd year who is currently on £13.5k.

As others have said there is just more and more hurdles getting introduced into our sector and with automation using cloud technology and apps I can see the traditional trainee role being redundant in the next 5 - 10 years. As accountants predict we will be hiring people with different skill sets to those we currently hire eg customer care focused, business development/growth.

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By Maslins
to marks
21st Jun 2019 09:12

marks wrote:

...expect a starting salary of £9k - £11k as thats what school leavers get and thats who you would be up against). We have school leaver currently in her 2nd year who is currently on £13.5k.


Wow! I thought starting salary we offer was low...but it's ~50% higher than that and goes up quickly!
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to marks
21st Jun 2019 11:43

I live with a teacher and I disagree with your points 1-5.

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By Alana
to marks
21st Jun 2019 18:54

Hi,

I understand that every job is stressful etc., but teaching is not at all how you have described it and I feel strongly enough about it to explain!

1. Students leave the classroom at that time, but I don't leave school until 6pm. That's 7am-6pm in school Monday-Friday. 3.30-6 isn't free time either. It is filled with meetings, contacting parents, marking assessments etc. Then I go home, have dinner and start planning for the next day from about 8pm-11pm each night. It's not uncommon to be up until 1am with sudden deadlines/forgetting to mark a set of books/underestimating how long it will take to plan a certain lesson etc.
2. Sundays are completely out for me as they are spent planning all day (seriously, I sometimes do 9am-11pm with small breaks to eat). Saturday is my only day off but I'm usually so exhausted that I stay home instead of socialising with friends. I am working a 70 hour week currently and getting paid £25,000 to do it.
3. Yes, holidays are great. But a large portion of them are spent planning. If I have a week off, I usually have two full days properly to myself before having to get back into the swing of things. With my salary, and living in the south-east, I can't really afford to go on holiday so my days off are spent around the house dreading going back to school.
5. I don't have a wind down period until the last week of the year. Year 11 have gone on study leave, so I have to fill in a very detailed form describing what I have done in each 'free period' (3 per week) to benefit my department. I am given tasks. God forbid you'd have time to take a breather.

I don't mean to sound like a whiny child, but the current climate in teaching is dire. I am constantly receiving horrible emails from over-entitled parents, having to deal with awful behaviour from the students preventing you from doing your job properly and I don't even get time to eat lunch or go to the bathroom during the school day. The government is so desperate for teachers because so many are leaving because of all of this. It's clear from this thread that accounting has its own set of major issues, but I can't think of many benefits to teaching other than the pension and those handful of students who you have been able to make a difference with.

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to Alana
23rd Jun 2019 12:14

In practice, you get horrible emails from entitled clients whinging about your fees which are higher because you've had to spend hours correcting their book-keeping mistakes or answering inane questions they should know, i.e. clients emailing asking for their NI number or a copy of their accounts (which you've already sent electronically and by post), simply because they're too bone idle to look themselves. These kids and parents you despise turn into clients and then inflict themselves on their accountants!

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By Mr_awol
to Alana
24th Jun 2019 11:25

If you're only on £25k and working those hours then I imagine you haven't been doing the job 'that' long?

I've lived with a teacher and had several friends and family members in teaching. Your points 1-5 or no more reflective of teaching generally than Marks, in my experience.

The more junior teachers i know have a life very similar to yours - and on £13k whilst on the Graduate Teaching Programme it is even worse.

The senior teachers I know we are talking departmental and/or year heads, ASTs and so on) have a bank of lesson plans and whilst they can't just trot out the exact same stuff year after year, they have the experience to adapt for curricular changes etc. Yes there's lots of work to build this up in the beginning but it eases dramatically. Now whilst they do work a lot of weekends and holidays, it is exam marking (for hefty pay) or cash in hand tutoring not work for school. They are very much higher rate taxpayers and will have a sizeable pension at the end of it all. They pay quite a lot for holidays but now their kids have grown up it doesn't make that much difference actually because the types of long-hauls they go on aren't affected in price quite so dramatically as not many people are taking kids anyway.

So stick with it, and in 5-10 years you'll be earning a lot more (especially on FTE given the holidays and working hours) than you would in accountancy. Plus you'll have a much better pension than a minimum contribution to NEST gives.

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to Alana
24th Jun 2019 17:05

Alana wrote:

I don't mean to sound like a whiny child, but the current climate in accountancyis dire. I am constantly receiving horrible emails from over-entitled clients, having to deal with awful behaviour from other employees preventing you from doing your job properly and if I want to use the toilet I need to find a creative place to put it on my timesheet

Thought I'd save you some time and made you a paragraph you will be using 6 months after starting at an accounting practice ;)

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20th Jun 2019 20:26

I started as a secondary school teacher - jacked it in at 30 - so a similar trajectory. I'm not sure that secondary teaching is a sustainable lifetime career.

Addressing your particular point, it is not really about maths. What you need is arithmetic and approximation skills - and common sense. What I mean by that is that just about everyone in accounting relies on software nowadays. Some are too reliant and so don't notice when a ridiculous result arises. These errors can be due to errors in the use of the software - but are, far too often, down to faults in the "professional" software itself. Are you the sort of person who can live with this? Maths in schools is still so deterministic !

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21st Jun 2019 11:54

Accountancy is an excellent flexible career now especially with the advent of cloud accounting. I considered moving from accountancy to teaching in my mid-20s but I was not accepted onto the teacher training course. They obviously saw something that I didn't as I couldn't imagine being restricted to only taking holidays in school holidays, having to attend work rigidly for the whole school hours etc and would not have enjoyed that at all. I enjoy the fact that accountancy is reasonably well-paid and you can work from anywhere at any time to fit around your life.

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21st Jun 2019 13:15

To the OP. I really don't envy you on this one.

Echoing the negatives already mentioned above. It really isn't the profession it once was. The bureaucrats moved in some years ago and have killed it. All for the good of the profession and the wider world apparently. Winding the clock back there was still plenty of bureaucracy but each year they ramp it up another notch and expect you to absorb it.

The public sector attitude where this comes from is 'it doesn't matter, you'll just pass the cost on to your clients' Unfortunately this cannot really happen as you can only cover a small part of it imho. Client's do not like a ramp in fees no matter how you dress it.

If only I had a few more miles on the clock and retirement or a wind down. Kids and mortgages are still well on the cards and until then, stuck in this ever increasingly harder groundhog day.

The only thing to look forward out of this profession is eventually getting out of it. Not that I don't like the profession, the clients, productive work etc is generally the best aspect of it. The legislation, backside covering and wasted admin time is the killer.

Oh and almost forgot, if you go into practice has anyone told you about December/January yet?

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By Alana
21st Jun 2019 19:08

Thanks for all of your replies!

I'm a little bit deflated now as I'm shocked about the amount of negativity surrounding the profession. But I understand and I appreciate the honesty, of course. I can deal with red tape and I suppose if I were to start now the current climate would be normal for me, but the low starting salaries are a concern. Like I said, I'm keen on building up my own personal wealth and I'm scared to take a financial hit for 3-5-however many years. Lots to think about

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By Matrix
to Alana
21st Jun 2019 20:48

Alana

Having read your posts I think you need to make a move from teaching. Whether this is accounting/finance or something else doesn’t matter.

You could find a rewarding job working the same hours for the same pay in something you enjoy.

I trained with someone who left teaching at 30 and did ACA. Have you looked at training contracts? There would be 3 years’ study but after that so many possibilities. Or have you looked at becoming a financial
adviser as previously mentioned?

You have so many years of your working life ahead of you that anything is possible and I love the fact that people swap between careers these days.

Ask your family and friends who know you best for ideas.

Good luck.

(And most people on here run their own practices which is rather challenging at present but there is so much more to a career in finance. My best time was working in the City so you could try a graduate programme there. Having your own practice is flexible and rewarding but takes a long time to earn decent money and can be stressful and so I think you would be better off employed.)

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By DJKL
to Alana
21st Jun 2019 22:43

In my experience (apart from awful periods like post 2008 financial meltdown) working outwith practice is less stressful (though I suspect that depends on the role/employer) than say managing/owning or being in a more senior supervisory role in a professional practice.

It can have the edge re satisfaction if one works for a particular business outwith practice and are actually more involved in creating something (say a part of the business, a property development etc) when being more involved at the inception may give more ownership/pride in the end result, but can also mean it is more repetitive re tasks/work location etc- churning out accounts monthly/quarterly, cashflow management, payroll runs, chasing debtors, processing invoices and creditors etc can get a bit stale- why I post on here so much I suspect, to get a break.

Practice can bring more variety of new challenges, new clients, different scenarios, a need to possibly learn more new things regularly, this can keep one interested but can also be a bit of a burden- in the old days finding time to say read Taxation Magazine whilst lying in the bath (paper version) and trying to keep up to speed in a broader field- it can also become a tad like a hamster in a wheel, same old same old year in year out just with new ways needed to do things you have done for years.

This is where I have got to age 59, I am frankly getting too long in the tooth to want to keep learning a mass of new things and processes all the time so am axing my practice role, whilst I will still need to keep on top of legislation developments the range of these will be much more re a specific business (in my case property)and hopefully somewhat less onerous.

Whilst my earlier comment was a tad negative as I do not see a wonderous future in practice, certainly at the small client level, it does appear to becoming more stack em high and sell em cheap, and I suspect some of the other adverse comments about the profession maybe take a similar view, there is still a future role for accountants but I suspect there could ,with AI etc,be fewer required at an intellectually stimulating level and far fewer at a processing level.

You need to take a bit of time to really think where you see an accountancy career taking you, practice, industry, public sector etc, at 30 whilst certainly not too old you have burned away a few years so may not really have the time left to say train in practice and later move to industry if you find that more to your taste, your age both at outset and post qualifying will likely be a factor re who you are competing with for roles, certainly for the first maybe ten years, so really investigating what you want to do, the kind of work, is possibly more important to you than to a twenty two year old; you do have fewer years to change track.

Anyway good luck with whatever you decide and do a lot of research re the sorts of career paths open before you make the decision.

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to Alana
23rd Jun 2019 12:33

Alana wrote:
I can deal with red tape and I suppose if I were to start now the current climate would be normal for me

Can you deal with red tape if you have to do it for free? When it reduces the amount of time you can charge for? Clients won't pay for time you spending doing training, completing checklists, doing money laundering checks, filling in practice returns, etc. So you find yourself working for nothing just to satisfy office dwellers who need, in turn, to tick their boxes.

The current climate won't be the "normal" in 5, 10, 20 years - it'll get worse. Money laundering regulation started about 15 years ago and is still getting more strict as new rules come in every few years. Last year we got something new - GDPR which meant loads of extra unpaid work. Now we've the start of MTD, just for VAT at the moment, but will be extended to other taxes in maybe 5 years. It's never ending.

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23rd Jun 2019 12:11

I've been in practice for 35 years and really wouldn't recommend it these days. In fact, my son is 18 and I'm doing my very best to push him in a very different direction. He could have my practice as I've had enough
but I want him to do something better with his life - he's better than being an accountant in practice!

If he wants a career in accountancy, then I'd push him towards industry, preferably specialising in automation, cloud accounting, artificial intelligence, financial forensics etc.

Small practice accountancy is a mug's game, even worse now that every man and his dog are setting themselves up as accountants and the regulatory bodies are turning a blind eye to the blatant misrepresentations (using training practice logos to make themselves look like they're properly regulated) and ignoring the widespread abuse of non qualified employing qualifieds to sign off accounts and references without practising certificates.

A strong profession needs strong regulatory bodies, but here in the UK, our bodies are more intent on persecuting their members for minor infractions than protecting and supporting their members.

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By Matrix
to Ken Howard
23rd Jun 2019 12:42

I don’t see where Alana says she is going to start her own practice. There are still plenty of jobs in accounting and a qualification opens the door to plenty of well paid, rewarding, lifetime careers.

If she has a 2.1 maybe she can apply for graduate schemes.

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24th Jun 2019 16:28

I'm shocked at the negative comments here. It definitely is not all bad out here.
I've been in the accountancy world all my life apart from 2 years in recruitment, which I hated. I avoided the professional firms as the pay was poor and I thought the attitudes were dickensian. So I trained and earned a fortune as an accountant in commerce, which was a lot more enjoyable.
But being an employee didn't suit me, so I set up my own accountancy business at the age of 28 and here I am 24 years later. I can choose who I work for, so I've chosen nice clients who can afford to pay my fees and don't have to be chased for money. They are intelligent reasonable people and if they have the odd unreasonable moment, well so do I. If you run your own business you can make it work for you. A dodgy client can be shown the door. You don't have to work for people you can't stand.
I love what I do - yes really. And if I wanted to earn big bucks I probably could, if I could be bothered to.
I suggest trying to get into commerce in some way to get your training and pass your exams. It won't be easy, which is why you desperately need to do lots of networking - as that could be your way in. If you're a sporty person join a club and network like crazy. Tell everyone you need help on finding your first trainee job. Personally I'm not a sporty person, but I got a big break by volunteering for Meals on Wheels years ago and happening to partner with the finance director of a retailer in Oxford street.
If you think about it really hard and try lots of different ways to get your foot in the door it will happen. Personality is the key and it sounds to me as if you have that already.

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to Moonbeam
27th Jun 2019 21:06

[quote=Moonbeam]

A dodgy client can be shown the door. You don't have to work for people you can't stand.
I love what I do - yes really.

Your comment is so refreshing!

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28th Jun 2019 09:55

A final thought. When you switch career - If you switch career - do train yourself to stop being a teacher. I regularly found myself still trying to herd others when in a corridor !

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02nd Jul 2019 07:35

A lot of people suggest self study of AAT but I would recommend ATT. Association of Taxation Technicians. It will give you a deeper tax knowledge and most of the accounts prep work is done on software. It will also mean you can hit the ground running if you do switch. It takes 18 months to 2 years. Also don't restrict yourself to practice. There's generally more money to e made in industry.

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