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Client is making me nervous

Client is making me nervous

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My client has asked for advice. He would like to set up a UK company, which outsources production of beverages to Kuwait for sale in the Gulf area. The business will receive income from the gulf and make payments to the company in Kuwait. There would be no staff in the UK and he would be looking to make the registered office my office address.

Firstly, I'm never going to meet this chap, so how would I undertake the MLRegs?

Secondly, how can I verify that they are doing what they say they are doing? I'm not sure I understand why they are setting the business up in this way.

Sorry, I'm feeling a bit out of my depth and I would normally say no, but he is a client of a management consultant client of mine here in the UK and I don't want to loose this client unnecessarily.

Many Thanks in advance

SD

Replies (15)

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Red Leader
By Red Leader
23rd Sep 2013 15:22

I agree with you

I wouldn't want to take on this client either.

In the circumstances, I would say that I don't deal with offshore businesses.

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Giraffe
By Luke
23rd Sep 2013 15:30

I agree

I would walk away and say that you don't deal with offshore businesses. 

I had a similar job I didn't want recently and said I didn't generally deal with x businesses and as it was outside my usual scheme of work by PI wouldn't cover it so sorry I couldn't help but good luck with the business.  Now, the PI bit wasn't true but I really didn't want to get involved and it made it less likely they'd come back again (I had already said no previously but obviously not forcefully enough).

 

 

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By Flash Gordon
23rd Sep 2013 15:37

Thirded

I'd avoid on the offshore grounds. It's a good excuse and if your gut would normally say no then stick with the decision. 

Personally my instinctive reaction was 'run!'

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By ShirleyM
23rd Sep 2013 15:44

Fourthed

is 'fourthed' a real word?

I would say it is outside the area of my expertise, and my PII wouldn't cover me for taking work outside my expertise.

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By pembo
23rd Sep 2013 15:59

bargepole

and don't touch with are the words that spring to mind. Just say you do not deal with companies whose trade is wholly outside the UK. If your UK client recommended him to you might be an idea to ring him/her just after you explain to this guy why you cannot take him on so he/she hears it from you first. Blag it with PI if you need to.

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David Winch
By David Winch
23rd Sep 2013 17:15

If you take this on . . .

If you take this on you will continually be worried that either you are failing to advise the client about some relevant issue of which you are unaware or that the client is doing something which they should not be doing and of which you are unaware.

Just say "No".

Your 'excuse' could be that you are not yourself the best person to provide advice to this type of business.

David

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By Jason Dormer
23rd Sep 2013 19:57

Dont worry about the referer

As per usal Mr Scholes hits the nail on the head.  When I get referrals I don't want, I alsways ring up the referer and thank them for the opportunity but explain why I cannot take it. 

Without exception, they always understand and will usually thank you for your honesty and continue to refer more suitable clients.

Usually I would also offer to find a more suitable alternative firm just to add additional service, but in this case I'd probably be a bit more reluctant to do that!

 

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By Jason Dormer
23rd Sep 2013 19:55

Eh what?

Just realised it wasnt Paul Scholes who gave that advice but Pembo.  I've had a long day. :)

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By Sarah Offord
24th Sep 2013 09:53

Thank you!

Thanks again! I feel like I've dodged a bullet!

SD

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By pembo
24th Sep 2013 10:28

no offence Jason

easy mistake to make....you may have heard Paul packed his boots away at the end of last season that is in my opinion the main reason MUFC are struggling to string 2 passes together at the moment....

Glad the OP has been reassured....apart from anything supplying "beverages" in the gulf area sounds decidedly dodgy...friend of mine is working in the area and has told me the tricks of the trade to get around having ones hands forceably removed....

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By pauljohnston
25th Sep 2013 11:44

Been here

All good advice above.

I suggest that if you are un-happy find an accountant that would take this on.  There are specialists in all areas.

 

Once you have found the accountant give the new contact their detaiils and tell the contact that you are very sorry you cant help.

If this is dodgy then you are away from it but if it is OK the contact will get good service and you will be a happy accountant.

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By Vaughan Blake1
25th Sep 2013 12:23

If in doubt - don't!

Is my maxim!

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By leicsred
25th Sep 2013 12:58

Similar circumstances

We took a client on in vaguely similar circumstances, it was a nightmare from the start and we had to disengage in the end as it was way too complex and we never felt in control. I certainly would just follow Zammo's example in the future.

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By hiu612
25th Sep 2013 13:51

Ease of a UK company

This is getting to be quite common, as people from certain far flung (and not so far flung) lands can often not believe the cheapness and speed of incorporating a UK company. Compared to Germany, for example, where the process is much more costly and protracted. I don't disagree with any of the advice so far, but it might be that the motivations for setting up a UK company are innocent.

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By hiu612
25th Sep 2013 13:51

Ease of a UK company

This is getting to be quite common, as people from certain far flung (and not so far flung) lands can often not believe the cheapness and speed of incorporating a UK company. Compared to Germany, for example, where the process is much more costly and protracted. I don't disagree with any of the advice so far, but it might be that the motivations for setting up a UK company are innocent.

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