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Client skulduggery

Client skulduggery

Didn't find your answer?

We want to hear your stories, dear AccountingWEB users, of clients looking to use you for all kinds of dodgy dealings, how you dealt with it, what happened. It's for a story, and it'll probably be quite cathartic for you to get it all out. Don't need to name names, I just wanna hear your tales. 

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By nogammonsinanundoubledgame
16th Mar 2015 10:53

We deal with a firm of undertakers.

Are they engaged in skullduggery? (sic)

With kind regards

Clint Westwood

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Replying to tom123:
Francois
By Francois Badenhorst
16th Mar 2015 11:06

Excellent.

 I have to give it to you, you made me giggle. 

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By andrew.hyde
16th Mar 2015 12:26

Skulduggery

Great word, so much so I was forced to look up where it comes from.  The answer is - nobody knows. Some authorities say something on the lines of

'Mid 19th century: alteration of Scots sculduddery, of unknown origin'

but that's as far as it goes.  Any Scots out there who can tell us more?

I would hope the scope for doing dastardly deeds through a tax professional is diminished by Money Laundering Regs and SARs.  But perhaps that's wishful thinking.

I'm glad it's for a story not a poem.  You'd have had difficulty finding a decent rhyme for 'skulduggery'.  Oh hang on I've thought of one.

Thuggery...

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Replying to rockallj:
Francois
By Francois Badenhorst
16th Mar 2015 12:41

Could be a poem

Might be time to reinvigorate AccountingWEB with a Prometheus Unbound-esque epic poem.

Also, got any stories to tell? Feel free to share. You can PM me, too! 

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Replying to rockallj:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
16th Mar 2015 17:21

Nothing definite but this may be worth reading

andrew.hyde wrote:

Great word, so much so I was forced to look up where it comes from.  The answer is - nobody knows. Some authorities say something on the lines of

'Mid 19th century: alteration of Scots sculduddery, of unknown origin'

but that's as far as it goes.  Any Scots out there who can tell us more?

I would hope the scope for doing dastardly deeds through a tax professional is diminished by Money Laundering Regs and SARs.  But perhaps that's wishful thinking.

I'm glad it's for a story not a poem.  You'd have had difficulty finding a decent rhyme for 'skulduggery'.  Oh hang on I've thought of one.

Thuggery...

this link has comments at its foot that suggest a possible north European influence re the derivation, but it is all really conjecture

http://www.word-detective.com/2008/02/skulduggery/

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By GuestXXX
17th Mar 2015 18:06

.

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Stepurhan
By stepurhan
16th Mar 2015 14:52

Tales of Skulduggery

http://www.skulduggerypleasant.co.uk/

I think the problem you have here is that no-one wants to admit to client skulduggery.

For honest accountants there will be two scenarios. The skulduggery was presented at the start, and said personages did not become clients. The skulduggery was presented later and the client was told they couldn't do it. Either the client took notice or they ceased to be clients. So basically no such thing as skulduggery by anyone who is a client.

For dishonest accountants, the desire not to incriminate themselves probably comes to the fore.

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Replying to John Stokdyk:
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By GuestXXX
17th Mar 2015 18:07

.

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Francois
By Francois Badenhorst
16th Mar 2015 15:40

So...

What you're saying is that it happens, but people aren't willing to speak outside of the bedroom?

It's not about gossiping. My intention was to collate some experiences, and take them to an expert to ask how to deal with it. The gossip would be secondary (and not published directly). If you don't want to put it out there for the world to see PM me. Anonymity and privilege guaranteed! 

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Replying to DJKL:
Stepurhan
By stepurhan
16th Mar 2015 16:45

Expert advice?

FrancoisB wrote:
My intention was to collate some experiences, and take them to an expert to ask how to deal with it.
Us : A client asks us to do something dodgy.

Expert : Refuse to do so. If they persist refuse to act and file a protective MLR.

That would pretty much seem to cover it. What expertise does the posited expert have to provide that would take advice beyond this? For that matter, how does one become an expert in turning down dodgy dealings? If you gave us a clearer idea of what sort of helpful advice you expect to be able to provide then you might find people a bit more forthcoming.

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By Vaughan Blake1
16th Mar 2015 15:44

If it's for a story

Why not just make it up?  No matter how outlandish you make it, the chances are that it has happened somewhere to someone!

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By GuestXXX
17th Mar 2015 18:08

.

 

 

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By Vaughan Blake1
16th Mar 2015 16:29

The expert should say in each case...

If it is skulduggery then report it to your MLRO.  If you are the MLRO (unlucky!) then report it to SOCA (or whatever they call themselves now).

Doesn't sound like a very exciting story to be honest!

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By GuestXXX
17th Mar 2015 18:08

.

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Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
16th Mar 2015 17:10

Could you make do with secondhand stories?

I doubt anyone  on here may give out any information of any interesting  deeds with which they have direct experience, however one of my favourite frauds was:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salad_Oil_Scandal

which I recall being told about a long time ago in the 1980s. The audacity to pump over from one hold to another whilst entertaining the dupe always struck me as suitable for a movie.

However I suspect this is not really the sort of thing you really want.

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By Vaughan Blake1
17th Mar 2015 16:18

Sir Gregor Macgregor's fraud

Is IMHO the best fraud ever.  See Wikipee, but in a nutshell he invented an imaginary country, created its economy, sold its land to people in England & Scotland and exchanged its currency for £s to enable emigrants to move there.  He then sold fares on imaginary ships to the luckless victims to get to their new country.

Just genius!

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Replying to tonyholloway:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
17th Mar 2015 16:40

Sounds interesting

Vaughan Blake1 wrote:

Is IMHO the best fraud ever.  See Wikipee, but in a nutshell he invented an imaginary country, created its economy, sold its land to people in England & Scotland and exchanged its currency for £s to enable emigrants to move there.  He then sold fares on imaginary ships to the luckless victims to get to their new country.

Just genius!

Sounds interesting, thanks.

I  have just ordered  a secondhand  hardback copy 'Sir Gregor Macgregor and the Land That Never Was' from Amazon (kindle version a tad expensive)

Subject to the weight of my bag I will take it with me to read during my Easter holiday next month. It does sound intriguing.

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By Gilly
17th Mar 2015 16:35

Attempted skullduggery?

After a discussion with one client, when I asked him to keep ALL receipts. He provided me with an invoice for a grave plot he'd purchased for himself. I did, of course, explain that death is not a normal business activity for a plumber.

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