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Congrats to Sir Ed Davey

He's my local MP

Didn't find your answer?

And was very prominent in spearheading the Loan Charge challenge. A very rare example of a genuinely decent bloke of an MP (apparently in the expenses scandal it was found he didn't have any (or very few at least)!).

Knocks spots off Nick Clegg et al, that's for sure.

Maybe if the Liberal Democrats get any power at the next election the nasty Loan Charge legislation will be completely abolished retrospectively?

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paddle steamer
By DJKL
27th Aug 2020 12:49

I suspect it is wilderness years for the party and I say that as a party member, they have no traction, they are totally awol from the news, they still need to form a coherent message now Brexit has happened and we are merely in transition; I did not even bother voting and whilst I still pay my subs I am really not sure why.

Ed may be a good guy but frankly I doubt that really matters.

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Replying to DJKL:
Red Leader
By Red Leader
27th Aug 2020 12:59

I always recall that David Steel was the MP for Roxburgh, Selkirk and Peebles. To which I credit my eclectic knowledge of Scottish geography.

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Replying to Red Leader:
paddle steamer
By DJKL
27th Aug 2020 13:07

The Boy David- I went to see him speak in 1981 whilst I was at Edinburgh University, a week or so after his "Go back to your constituencies and prepare for government" speech- I am still waiting.

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Replying to DJKL:
Psycho
By Wilson Philips
27th Aug 2020 13:26

Paraphrased to comedy effect by Edmund B:

"Baldrick, go back to your kitchen sink, and prepare for Government!"

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Replying to Wilson Philips:
paddle steamer
By DJKL
27th Aug 2020 13:49

Apt.

When I read "Things Can only Get Better" by John O'Farrell (And if you all have not read it has a certain something so is worth a few hours of your time) I developed a sympathy for Labour supporters from 1979 to 1997, but then I had to recognise that of course for the Liberals that is their natural state.

On my Dad's side my Grandfather was a staunch Liberal/Lloyd George advocate, he was still awaiting their resurgence up to 1989 when age 98 he died, but at least he had experienced them in office during his life.

My Great Uncle on my Mother's side was the same, a staunch Liberal, member of the party, active in Kilmarnock (I inherited his Life Of Gladstone, his Gladstone Punch Cartoons and his correspondence from W E Gladstone's nephew inviting him to tea in the H of C), but as I have aged I have realised that actually they are not in my lifetime regaining office- akin to my wife's Grandfather who lived his whole life waiting for Hibs to win the Scottish Cup, they obliged for my wife but not for her grandfather.

I think the Liberals are at best one for any grandchildren I may have.

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Replying to DJKL:
Red Leader
By Red Leader
27th Aug 2020 13:57

The history of the Liberals from late 19th Century to 1930s is fascinating - well, it is to me anyway! The first split over Irish Home Rule leading to the formation of the Liberal Unionists, who after a few decades as a separate party merged with the Conservatives to form the Conservative & Unionist Party. Then Lloyd George's individual tour de force which eventually caused another split with the Asquith wing. Much more to it all than just this but it gives you a flavour.

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Replying to Red Leader:
paddle steamer
By DJKL
27th Aug 2020 14:37

It all vaguely comes back from O Grade then Higher History at school.

The wonders of the Scottish system, for third and fourth year we waded through British History circa 1783 to early 1930.

Just in case all the Factory Acts, Corn Laws, Irish Home Rule et al were not exciting enough for a 14-16 year old if continuing with history we then took the Higher in fifth year , we got European History 15th century to 18th century (which was interesting) but as a bonus they revisited English/British History from 1603 until the mid 19th century just in case you were missing the excitement- in my case it was even worse, having been turfed out of Latin at the end of second year (19th = out of 20) I also took an O Grade in Economic History covering much the same period (though I did at least prefer Economic History)

On the plus point I at least body swerved British History I & II at university, I doubled Economic History 1 with American History II, my poor wife, taking a joint honours history and politics degree, suffered for her first two years there, wading through British 19th century history- still to this day both her and my least favourite period of history. (She has more of a penchant for communist Russia and [***] Germany - not sure how many hundreds of books on them crosses the line to obsessive)

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Replying to DJKL:
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By Rammstein1
27th Aug 2020 15:29

I recently read The Winter War about Finland v Russia, your wife might like that if she hasn't read it.

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Replying to DJKL:
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By Rammstein1
27th Aug 2020 15:30

I recently read The Winter War about Finland v Russia, your wife might like that if she hasn't read it.

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Replying to DJKL:
Red Leader
By Red Leader
27th Aug 2020 16:24

I think the history of the British Isles 1603-1702 is the nap choice.

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Replying to DJKL:
By Moonbeam
27th Aug 2020 17:07

You've also accurately described my situation and thoughts, but I do actually still vote.

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Replying to DJKL:
By Moonbeam
27th Aug 2020 17:09

.

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By emanresu
27th Aug 2020 15:21

Two "Sirs" as party leaders.

Boris must feel really excluded.

Time for a bit of levelling-up?

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By emanresu
27th Aug 2020 15:48

"Maybe if the Liberal Democrats get any power"

Forget it.

1 Little of the Liberal vote since 1945 has ever been anything more than a protest vote.

2 Liberals favour coalitions - but the image they like to project is one of high morals (ho, ho) and firm beliefs - ALL of which have to go on the bonfire when you negotiate a coalition. QED

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Replying to emanresu:
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By Justin Bryant
27th Aug 2020 16:37

Yes; Nick Clegg was particularly dud (amongst other things) at dealing with the coalition. George Osborne is on record as saying he needn't have conceded to the student loan U-turn etc.

Sir Ed cannot be any worse than that at least.

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Replying to Justin Bryant:
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By memyself-eye
27th Aug 2020 17:28

I quite liked Jeremy Thorpe.......

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Replying to memyself-eye:
Red Leader
By Red Leader
27th Aug 2020 18:28

He was good in that film wot was on the telly.

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Replying to memyself-eye:
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By emanresu
27th Aug 2020 18:43

Did he like you, though?

It was written that, whatever he had achieved, he would be remembered by these four words:

Woof, woof; bang, bang

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Replying to emanresu:
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By memyself-eye
27th Aug 2020 22:23

didn't Jeremy write that book 'Scot of the antarctic'?

I think that was the title.....

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Replying to Justin Bryant:
Red Leader
By Red Leader
27th Aug 2020 18:30

Re coalitions: their knowledge of UK political history should have told them that the minor party always gets eaten by the larger partner.

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RLI
By lionofludesch
27th Aug 2020 17:48

I just vote for who I dislike least.

Though the result always seems to be Yvette Cooper by a distance.

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Replying to lionofludesch:
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By memyself-eye
27th Aug 2020 22:24

Not heard of Dianne Abbott then?

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Oaklea
By Chris.Mann
27th Aug 2020 21:59

The very mention of the name: George Osborne and I cringe, with a passion. Add in the name: David Cameron and I feel physically sick.

What a waste of all those years where, with some; direction, imagination, verve and enthusiasm, as a country, we could have achieved so much?

Instead, the Eton mob, demonstrated a complete lack of gumption. Nine jobs Osborne. What a complete and utter waste of space. The austerity king!

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Replying to Chris.Mann:
paddle steamer
By DJKL
27th Aug 2020 22:11

Do not despair, anything Cameron could **** up Boris can **** up better, transition end looming and we still have hee haw, if anything it to get ratified between the UK and the EU then late September/early October seems to be the effective deadline for getting any form of draft in place capable of ratification by the October deadline, it is not looking likely..

http://eureferendum.com/blogview.aspx?blogno=87712#disqus_thread

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