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Cowboy accountants

Wrong terminology these days?

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Should we really be using this term cowboy accountants?

Firstly, my understanding is that cowboys are very skilled at what they do and can likely do far more with a cow than many people who wield that term, so I don't think there is a place in modern society for using that term derogatorily. 

Secondly, don't we have to refer to cowpeople now?

But then what do I know.

Replies (31)

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By Paul Crowley
04th Aug 2020 15:18

Had a call from a prospective client.
Client has no taxable income, but does have a company with profit of £30,000 paying CT on profit.
No Paye scheme and no dividends paid.
May not have full story, but at the moment it apppears that the accountant is on a horse with a lassoo

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Replying to Paul Crowley:
Flag of the Soviet Union
By thevaliant
04th Aug 2020 23:31

I'd like to hope the DLA is through the roof therefore?

Or is sundry expenses very high?
(Had a client like this well over a decade ago - he was the company, the company was him - used the company bank account like his own and just posted everything to sundry).

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Replying to thevaliant:
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By Paul Crowley
05th Aug 2020 11:11

Wife earns over £120K pa

He was told there is tax to pay if he takes money out of company. Left it all in

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By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
04th Aug 2020 15:38

Well its apt in that you want to hire someone trained in dealing with tax'n'accounts and that sort of a thing if you have some accounts of a tax return needing filing, rather than trained with dealing with cows, horses and living in the wild.

Which from some of the stuff I pick up can only be assumed to be the case.

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Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
04th Aug 2020 15:42

“You see, in this world, there’s two kinds of people, my friend; those with loaded guns and those who dig. You dig.”

(The "You dig" having a double meaning as being both "you understand "and" you excavate")

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By Tax Dragon
04th Aug 2020 16:32

Oh, you are objecting to the use of "cowboy"?

I thought from your heading that you were resurrecting the discussion about the use of "accountant".

https://www.accountingweb.co.uk/any-answers/time-to-talk-about-unqualifi...

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Replying to Tax Dragon:
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By MC1
04th Aug 2020 17:24

No, not trying to resurrect anything.

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By Paul Crowley
04th Aug 2020 17:56

There must be cowboys and cowgirls all over the UK seething at the idea that useless accountants and bookkeepers are claiming to have their skills.

Even worse when useless builders try the same.

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Ivor Windybottom
By Ivor Windybottom
04th Aug 2020 18:08

Surely the phrase relates to cowboys being so poor at paperwork?!

I never saw any sign of proper ledgers in the old wild west movies.

I guess cowboys were not good at stock control.

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Replying to Ivor Windybottom:
Quack
By Constantly Confused
05th Aug 2020 08:32

Ivor Windybottom wrote:

Surely the phrase relates to cowboys being so poor at paperwork?!

I never saw any sign of proper ledgers in the old wild west movies.

I guess cowboys were not good at stock control.

My great great great grandad Steve was a cowboy but he got sick of the life so one day he saw a 'Bookkeeeper Wanted' sign in a brothel window and applied for the job.

Unfortunately, this being the Old West, he had never learned to read or write so they showed him the door. He sat outside looking so glum that the Madam came out and gave him an apple to try and cheer him up.

At that moment a businessman came past, saw the apple and offered to buy it from him. Steve took the money he had been given, went to the market and bought 2 apples, which he sold a few streets away before returning and buying 4, then 8 and so on.

Soon enough he had a cart, then he expanded his wares and got a small shop, which became several shops. Month on month, year on year, he grew his business until he had supermarkets in every state and became one of the richest men in all of America.

A magazine heard about this rags to riches story and interviewed him at his mansion. The interviewer was amazed to find that Steve still couldn't read or write.

"My God!" the interviewer said, "You've achieved all this while being illiterate, don't you ever wonder what you could have become if you had been able to read and write?"

Steve thought about this for a few moments.

"Well", he said, "I reckon I'd've been a bookkeeper at a brothel."

Thanks (1)
Replying to Constantly Confused:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
05th Aug 2020 08:53

Borrowing from Somerset Maugham's "The Verger" , perhaps.

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Replying to DJKL:
Quack
By Constantly Confused
05th Aug 2020 10:52

DJKL wrote:

Borrowing from Somerset Maugham's "The Verger" , perhaps.

Unashamedly stolen from The Big Book of Urban Legends (which I now feel likely stole it from Somerset Maugham :) )!

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Replying to Constantly Confused:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
05th Aug 2020 11:26

Possibly- it is a decent short story though a lot of years since I read it.

Stolen and stole are such harsh words, borrowed is better, besides there is a great literary tradition of borrowing in English right back to Chaucer knocking off various fabliaux within the Canterbury Tales.

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Replying to Ivor Windybottom:
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By memyself-eye
05th Aug 2020 10:53

Surely 'stock control' was the one thing they were good at - see the film 'city slickers' for confirmation.

Now, if Jack Palance was an an accountant......

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By mrme89
04th Aug 2020 18:13

‘Cowboy accountants’.
Definition: A phrase used by senior editors to cheese off half of the readership.

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blue sheep
By NH
04th Aug 2020 19:45

"You can refer to someone who runs a business as a cowboy if they run it dishonestly or are not experienced, skilful, or careful in their work"
I trust Colin in order to avoid reinventing a perfectly good cart wheel

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By Rweaver
04th Aug 2020 20:26

I prefer the term ‘unqualified’.

*sits back in chair with tub of popcorn*

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Replying to Rweaver:
Flag of the Soviet Union
By thevaliant
04th Aug 2020 23:32

I prefer the term 'ICAEW'.

(*ducks and runs*)

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Replying to thevaliant:
Quack
By Constantly Confused
05th Aug 2020 08:33

thevaliant wrote:

I prefer the term 'ICAEW'.

(*ducks and runs*)

Hey, leave the ducks out of this...

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Replying to thevaliant:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
05th Aug 2020 08:55

Undercooked that is a distinct possibility.

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Replying to thevaliant:
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By Paul Crowley
05th Aug 2020 10:10

Institution of Cowboys And (Equally) Womencowboys

( The ladies thought that cowgirls implied them being not mature enough for the job. Passed on a 52% majority)

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By Crouchy
05th Aug 2020 09:48

Surely the PC term is Cow-person ;)

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Replying to Crouchy:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
05th Aug 2020 09:56

"Person" surely discriminates against other sentient beings.

“We'll be saying a big hello to all intelligent lifeforms everywhere and to everyone else out there, the secret is to bang the rocks together, guys.” HHGTG

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Replying to DJKL:
blue sheep
By NH
05th Aug 2020 10:01

I think the current most PC term to use is Cowthey/them

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Replying to Crouchy:
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By Paul Crowley
05th Aug 2020 10:05

Cowboy would imply cowyoungperson

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Replying to Paul Crowley:
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By Tax Dragon
05th Aug 2020 11:37

Person?

Son?

Uhoh... my brain has just hung in an infinite loop. That's work out the window. (And debts in through the door!)

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Replying to Crouchy:
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By MC1
05th Aug 2020 17:29

I think Cow* as in Cow wildcard is maybe safest but would you say Cowildcard or Cowstar or Cowasterisk?

And then there is the cow (as opposed to bull) to think about.

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