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Delegate v DIY - how do you decide

delegate v DIY

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I've been tring to take a step back from alot of the grunt work in the office but find that the staff just aren't fast enough or ask far too many questions for my liking. (Does anyone else get frustrated at collaegaues who are really slow using excel or just their pc in general, you know when they keep scrolling to get to the bottom of a spreadsheet even though you show them how to use the keys)

Anyway, the issue is that I find that I keep jumping in just to get something done. Where do other people draw the line on this, do you just let the staff take care of it and they will come up to standard or do you still keep your toe in the water?

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26th Jun 2019 09:13

How many staff? do they all report directly to you?

spend some time to explain (and document) what you expect them to do and refer them to that when they have a problem?

Find a mechanism to share Excel 'hints and tips of the day/week' https://support.office.com/en-us/office-training-center

half day/month for group training?

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By Tickers
to WhichTyler
26th Jun 2019 10:15

WhichTyler wrote:

How many staff? do they all report directly to you?

spend some time to explain (and document) what you expect them to do and refer them to that when they have a problem?

Find a mechanism to share Excel 'hints and tips of the day/week' https://support.office.com/en-us/office-training-center

half day/month for group training?

Yes they report directly to me. I create training videos by recording regular tasks as I'm doing them but I find people are reluctant to change old habits.

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26th Jun 2019 11:28

Whats your charge out rate compared to theirs? If something takes you 2 minutes but them 10 I would suspect that you are still the significantly more expensive option.

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By Maslins
26th Jun 2019 12:50

It's a personal choice...but the more you stick to DIY, the harder it is to grow the firm.

Personally I think if you micro manage people, your workload won't reduce, but their motivation will. Trusting staff is often a good way to get the best from them. Of course there are limits, you don't let your brand new trainee have a chat with a client re tax planning.

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28th Jun 2019 10:54

When you employ staff you have to take the time to train them, set reasonable expectations and targets. This depends on what level they are at.

Be realistic about what they are capable of - and think back to when you were new. The learning curve is a big thing and years of experience = faster work.

Give them freedom to do things their way, as long as there isn't / doesn't need to be a fixed way of doing things, you never know, they may surprise you with a better way!

Expect questions! that's how people learn, be open to questions and take the time to answer them. If someone is continually asking the same questions then that is an issue that needs to be addressed. Personally I get concerned if a new employee doesn't have questions!

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By JD
28th Jun 2019 13:31

You could try reading ''The E Myth'' and that one about ''Monkey Management.'' I suspect you will find them useful.

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02nd Jul 2019 16:24

This is always a quandary when delegating tasks to staff, especially to those inexperienced. I have found that there is no one method that works for everyone.

However, I generally prefer to, once they are clear what is required, let them know if they have any questions to ask you will help and then to leave them to it. Then in yourself "let go" of how they get there as they will figure out their own way; "my way" may not be the only way to complete the task and allowing them the freedom, you may even find a better way to do it!

Once the task has been completed, there is the opportunity to provide feedback on how it has been done and maybe help them by pointing out the areas where they had difficulty. This also allows time not to be wasted with parts that they are confident with and do well. So they will feel like they have the freedom and ability to demonstrate their own skills and gain confidence with those parts where more assistance is required.

At first it may take longer than I would take and yet they will get there and eventually be as good or (hopefully) even better at it than me.

The important thing to remember is that it is an investment in your time so that more work than before they were hired can be completed in the long run.

I took me many years to work this out and I know that by getting frustrated that maybe the person is taking too long will at best will cause you stress and at worst annoy or destroy the confidence of the person who has been delegated the task, so being counter-productive.

Saying this, of course, there is always the case where someone will never get it and yet, unless you let them learn, you will never find out or get the best out of them.

So it is not easy and I hope my suggestions are useful!

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