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Dinner with DC tonight. What would you ask?

Dinner with DC tonight. What would you ask?

Not me, but my 17 year old son is having dinner with David Cameron tonight. Small gathering so plenty opportunity to grill our ex-leader.

My question of "Why did you give the electorate an impossible question to answer without years of political, economic or financial outcome training and then naff off when you lost?" has been vetoed.

 

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By mrme89
22nd Feb 2018 08:58

Why a pig?

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22nd Feb 2018 09:08

How does it make you feel walking past homeless people on the streets of oxford, given your polices have forced the closure the homeless shelters?

I mean, there you are walking past them, and you know your policies put those people under those cardboard boxes. Forced them to sleep out in the cold. Or do you just not go into oxford?

He can also add "when I think of you, that is your legacy". They really hate it when you mention legacy like that.

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22nd Feb 2018 09:05

I should add I have form, I got a ticking off from the headmaster at school for not shaking the hand of the local politician on prize day.

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By JSJ54
to ireallyshouldknowthisbut
23rd Feb 2018 10:08

My son refused to shake Jeffrey Archer's hand at speech day. I supported him and refused to applaud at the end of Archer's speech. This was obviously prior to his "exposure".

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to JSJ54
22nd Feb 2018 09:35

I'd gladly shake Jeffrey "warmly" by the throat.

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22nd Feb 2018 09:18

"Did you get any royalties for that first episode of Black Mirror?"

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22nd Feb 2018 09:34

Are you related to Tony Blair or, simply share a political persona?

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22nd Feb 2018 09:41

Ask him how he feels about this popular mindset of the more vocal end of the general public:

"Oh someone over there is upset. I'll blame it on whatever political party I don't like. I won't stop to think about whether it is up to them to solve every single problem everyone makes for themselves using other people's hard earned."

Youreallyshouldthink before spouting your anti-Tory rhetoric. It's getting dull.

Not handing out other people's money does not an evil person make.

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to AnnAccountant
22nd Feb 2018 10:06

Well Ann, it is caused by government policy.

Its not really the time or place, but it is IDS's policy is to make claiming benefits really hard. The idea of "sanctions" is quite frankly appalling. perhaps you haven ever lived on benefits so don't 'get it'. Suggest you have a look at "I David Blake". Its a fair reflection for nice middle class people who have never had toast with nothing on it for tea as your mum had run out of money.

It is then direct government policy to squeeze local council spending, and as homeless shelters are not an 'essential service' ie local council dont have to provide them, funding has been cut. Specifically in oxford (cameron's local city), they closed one with 50 odd beds in 2016. Directly after, the homeless number on the streets there have shot up. Who would have thunk? I know quite a lot about this as friend of mine worked there before it was closed.

Whilst an accountant who reads the budget I know how big the deficit it and hole big a hole there is in public finances, but i also get that funding these things is pretty cheap in the scheme of things and probably saves money in the long term, even forgetting about the poor sods on the street.

APologies if that offended you, and you are one of those who walk past, and not one of those who gets an extra coffee and warms 'em up a bit.

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22nd Feb 2018 09:52

Who's David Cameron ??

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By LW64
22nd Feb 2018 10:22

How do you feel about dividing the country and ruining choice and prospects for the young and then washing your hands of it?

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22nd Feb 2018 10:47

Ask him is he is surprised that a supposedly professional forum is unable to come up with a single grown-up question for a former Prime Minister of this country.

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By LW64
to andy.partridge
22nd Feb 2018 10:52

As a 'Grown Up' for some considerable time, I consider my question quite valid.
Who knows what your definition of a 'grown up question' is!

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to LW64
22nd Feb 2018 11:00

Your question is phrased in a way that lacks emotional maturity. It also assumes that you know the right answer to a complicated question, that there is no room for debate on it and the only valid answer is one that assumes your position is correct.

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By LW64
to andy.partridge
22nd Feb 2018 15:11

"Emotional maturity"?
Your personal communication resorting to personal insults does not exactly present the face of the eloquent and mature professional that you would wish to portray.
There was a degree of banter on the thread which either irked or missed you.
There is clearly room for debate on a vast topic, certainly still on going as there is no 'done deal'.
" The right decision demands adequate disagreements".
As you disagree with my perspective then I would say my work is done.

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to LW64
22nd Feb 2018 15:43

Lighten up. It was you who made it about you. I thought you wanted me to reply or was your intention to shut me down?

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By RedFive
to andy.partridge
22nd Feb 2018 10:58

andy.partridge wrote:

Ask him is he is surprised that a supposedly professional forum is unable to come up with a single grown-up question for a former Prime Minister of this country.

Agreed. Thought I had posted on the Daily Mail website by mistake.

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to RedFive
22nd Feb 2018 11:48

Literally none of these questions will be posed to DC because an intimate dinner is not an opportunity for a seventeen year old guest to interrogate the former PM.

Does your son just need advice on small talk? He could ask him where he buys his shoes I guess, at least that way he'd probably get an actual answer.

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to andy.partridge
22nd Feb 2018 11:15

Let's be honest. Cameron's not an unpleasant guy but, in reality, pretty light weight, when it came to politics. Hardly, earth moving, was he?
However, having said that, which of the 650, current MP's, would you say were "statesmen"? I'm thinking, less than the fingers on one hand.
I've always tried to take the middle ground, with christian (small "C") values and a genuine sense of care for my fellow man, and woman. These days I find most MP's have little imagination and little aptitude for "making change". I can't think of any Government agency which doesn't display a sense of drift, rather than providing true value for money and public service. That's not a shame, it's a tragedy.
I'm sure I'll be corrected but, hey ho.

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to Chris.Mann
22nd Feb 2018 12:21

That's always been the case and any memory or opinion to the contrary is nostalgia.

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to Chris.Mann
22nd Feb 2018 17:25

I don't think the 'c' word (large OR small 'c') applies in any way, shape, or form to the concept of decent behavour any more, having watched their downright evil behaviour in the US with growing incredulity and disgust... Happily that is not (generally) the case here -
yet. Nevertheless, I'd rather treat people with the respect and decency that comes with being a secular pagan :-)

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22nd Feb 2018 10:51

Ask him at what point will he understand that austerity doesn't actually work.

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By Locutus
to Glennzy
22nd Feb 2018 12:40

I’m not sure there has ever really been much austerity. Public spending has continued to rise throughout Cameron’s period in office and since.

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22nd Feb 2018 11:18

“George Osborne clearly structured the reduction in CT rates so that when he took over as PM we had pro-business low rates - introduced by him - and the lack of cash would be the new Treasury’s problem. Did DC actually think that that would happen, or was he just paying lip service to GO to keep him onside”.

Grown up question?

Sorry to be so boring!

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to atleastisoundknowledgable...
22nd Feb 2018 11:28

Are you saying that a lower rate of tax definitely results in lower tax raised and that would be a new Chancellor's problem? Do you see the problem with your question? It assumes a 'certainty' that is 'uncertain' and so no politician or intelligent person is going to answer a question delivered according to your rules.

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22nd Feb 2018 11:19

You do like fried chicken, don't you?

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By mg200
22nd Feb 2018 12:44

Have you thought about asking your son what he wants to ask?

Putting words in kids mouths is great but people sometimes think that they are showing an interest in politics and we should let them vote.

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By RedFive
to mg200
22nd Feb 2018 14:08

Sorry for your misunderstanding.

He is quite capable of thinking up his own questions.

Having secured a place at Oxford to study PPE he shouldn't have any difficulty in conversing with DC.

I was simply giving my fellow professionals an opportunity to ask a question, perhaps even related to the Accountancy profession.

I unfortunately misread the level of intellect on this forum given the majority of responses.

If we continually attack and ridicule our public servants then only the odd balls will apply and we will get what we deserve.

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By mrme89
to RedFive
22nd Feb 2018 15:43

I didn't realise that there was an entire qualification on Personal Protective Equipment.

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to RedFive
22nd Feb 2018 15:47

Didn't "DC" study PPE at Oxford?

There you go, some non-controversial/non-political common ground.

But I'm sure you all know that and didn't need someone as thick as me to mention it ;)

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to RedFive
23rd Feb 2018 08:29

"If we continually attack and ridicule our public servants then only the odd balls will apply and we will get what we deserve".

I always thought that this was a forum, open to a wide variety of opinion? People easily forget, or turn a blind eye, to such "scandals" as MP's expenses (from 2009) and a variety of other shortcomings. As I've got older, I've less and less patience with holders of Public office, who regularly demonstrate that they simply can't behave.

Opinion doesn't necessarily reflect intellect. It's insulting to suggest otherwise IMO.

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By DJKL
22nd Feb 2018 16:35

Ask him how he thinks history will remember his period in office.

Open question but with a slight slant.

Will his term be a brief footnote in a school textbook in 2070 or will it be a substantial part.

When one considers say the latter part of the 18th century to the 1930s which I covered in the 1970s (history stopped in circa 1933/34) it is interesting re who gets remembered (Pitt, Peel,Palmerston, Gladstone, Disraeliand Lloyd George and who gets forgotten, Rosebery, Salisbury etc)

Which camp will he be in, and like Lord North earlier will he be remembered for the wrong reasons?

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to DJKL
22nd Feb 2018 16:44

I will remember him for getting through more equal right for same sex couples. That took a lot of doing against some quite perplexing (to me at least) opposition.

BUt much like Bliar who did a lot of positive things before he started playing soldiers, he is going to be remembered for one thing, and one thing only. Whistling that little tune whilst exiting stage left to let someone else deal with his little tactical miscalculation to quieten the kippers.

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to ireallyshouldknowthisbut
22nd Feb 2018 17:03

I'm inclined to agree with you that Europe will be remembered long after same sex marriage. My view, not that anyone but me is interested, is that he made several errors on the same subject within a short space of time. For example,
1. Telling the public that the EU could reform
2. Actively setting out to canvas support from EU for reform
3. Telling us he would support Leave if he didn't get the reforms.
4. Failing to get more than cosmetic support from EU which left him weakened
5. Presenting that failure as success, which fooled nobody
6. Actively supporting Remain with George Osborne which did Remain no favours
7. Saying he would respect the result - he didn't
8. Saying he would trigger Article 50 without delay - he didn't
9. Saying he would lead the country out of the EU if Leave won - he deserted the scene at the earliest opportunity.

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By RedFive
23rd Feb 2018 08:35

Thank you all for your contributions especially DJKL who came up with the winner.

The question was framed more around his legacy so while he skirted the Brexit issue he was proud of the same sex marriage. He quoted a cop at Downing Street who stopped and thanked him for granting him the ability to marry the man he loved.

To put my post in context it was a small gathering at his old school at which my son attends. He gained a free scholarship there to complete his A levels and now walks the halls where a previous 19 Prime Ministers and future Kings have attended. He got to dine and drink a small whisky afterwards with him.

My son also discussed state versus public school with him being in a fairly unique position to have been to a ‘special measures’ state school up to GCSE’s and now one of the best schools in the world.

As a resident of an ex mining town in the North East of England who hasn’t even gone to University we find this whole experience (through the eyes of our son) amazing and bewildering in equal measures.

So thanks again for the contributions but until you walk in a dead mans shoes it’s impossible to really understand them......

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to RedFive
23rd Feb 2018 09:45

RedFive wrote:

He quoted a cop at Downing Street

Sir, I think you mean a Rozzer or Peeler.

Sounds like it was a fascinating evening and one he will remember for life. Great question.

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By DJKL
to RedFive
23rd Feb 2018 12:32

Politicians and their "legacy" is always a rich topic, catch is these days every time I hear the word, "legacy" in a political context I keep thinking about Tom (who we never see) in "The Thick of It"

Glad he enjoyed himself, these events and their stories are a great thing later in life. My father oft told the story of The Queen and Prince Philip visiting Claverhouse in Edinburgh and Philip, needing to be amused, being taken to the officers' mess and treating them all to a pint, albeit my father (who was in charge of the mess accounts) being unwilling to afterwards send his tab to The Palace to be settled.

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By tedbuck
23rd Feb 2018 11:55

As I understand that the cost of being allowed to dine with DC is not insubstantial how about "Why on earth do you think people would pay such a large sum to dine with a former advertising exec?" Oh, sorry, did someone say he had been a Prime Minister as well?
His legacy - the destruction of the Conservative Party and possibly Corbyn as our first Communist Prime Minister. And all because he couldn't negotiate with the EU or didn't want to.

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By RedFive
to tedbuck
23rd Feb 2018 13:40

He received no payment for being there. The college has a policy of not paying speakers / guests.

Maybe read my posts again.

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By tedbuck
to RedFive
23rd Feb 2018 16:18

Yes I noticed your comment after the post. He was however punted as being available to entertain at dinner parties at £10,000 per attendee.
At least that is my recollection of the flyer I saw. Presumably Caviar and champagne and ???? What could be worth that sort of money?

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23rd Feb 2018 13:41

Please ask David Cameron why he did not reduce the MP's gold-plated MPs' pensions as he promised to me before he went into office as PM.

I met him at an FSB dinner in Oxfordshire and pointed out that only MPs had such fantastic final salary pensions (50ths based if I recall), fully index linked. You cannot buy an equivalent private pension. Most people now have contributions-based pensions which depend on fund performance and are miniscule in comparison.

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23rd Feb 2018 14:10

I missed this. I'm Irish but if I had the opportunity to have a conversation with David Cameron I would say:
1. I've always admired him for the love and compassion he always showed for his late son Ivan and indeed his other children.
2. I've always admired him for the gracious statement and apology he made in the House of Commons after the Saville Report was issued.
Then I would ask him: What possessed you to allow the whole Brexit thing to happen?

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By brumsub
23rd Feb 2018 14:36

For such a momentous decision why did you not use your common sense and set a higher threshold such as, say, 65% for leaving the EU.

Instead, we have ended up with an almost 50:50 situation that has divided the country, diverted resources from tackling more pressing issues and a big exit bill to come!

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By tedbuck
to brumsub
23rd Feb 2018 16:22

Absolutely correct and the consequences of the current hiatus in dealing with anything but Brexit will be disastrous

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23rd Feb 2018 16:46

My question would be why are people still suggesting questions when the dinner has now clearly already taken place?

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