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Dropbox v Google Drive

Dropbox v Google Drive

My dropbox subscription  has come up for renewal. 

Since I am a Google Apps user, I am considering moving to Google Drive. 

From my research, there is no real difference between them. Am I missing something? 

Any opinions/comments would be appreciated.

Thanks

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26th Nov 2012 13:59

Google drive is very handy, especially if you're already a Google Apps user. While I love Dropbox in terms of synching and being quite aesthetically pleasing, I find myself using Google Drive increasingly on a day-to-day basis. It depends what you're using it for really, but I'd say give Google Drive a shot. 

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26th Nov 2012 14:10

Having used both

I much prefer Google Drive as it works really well alongside all of the other Google Apps. The one thing I've never really liked, however, is using it to sharing documents with others. I find the interface and setup of Dropbox much easier to quickly set up a shared destination, especially if others don't have Google accounts.

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By merlyn
26th Nov 2012 14:37

Encryption

If you use Truecrypt to encrypt any sensitive data you put into the cloud (as all firms should really) then Dropbox has the ability to only sync the changes to an encrypted volume, Google Drive has to sync the entire volume so takes a bit longer.

 

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26th Nov 2012 17:41

Paid for service?

I'm going to do for Dropbox as I like that I pay for it. This might be a naive assumption but, I'm assuming, it means they are going to be less tricksy with my data.

I've used Google Drives and don't like it as much.

Also love that it means I can share things between computers and phone (especially AI Writer and Compositions)

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26th Nov 2012 17:50

G Drive is paid for

Gareth, G Drive is also a paid for service after the first 5GB of storage. 

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26th Nov 2012 17:55

Dropbox

I may be missing something here as I have never paid for dropbox.

If I want clients to use it, they open an account, I share folders with them and I get extra MB

Am I doing something wrong?

 

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to spilly
27th Nov 2012 10:02

Free Dropbox is good too

amosprophet wrote:

I may be missing something here as I have never paid for dropbox.

If I want clients to use it, they open an account, I share folders with them and I get extra MB

Am I doing something wrong?

 

 

No, don't worry, I've never paid for Dropbox either. It's only if you want to go over a certain usage limit or are using other types of Dropbox, such as Dropbox for business. I've found the free version to be enough for me though, unless you're going to use it for major uploads.

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By j f
26th Nov 2012 20:45

A little curve ball...

Might I suggest SkyDrive (apologies if you're aware and have already decided against it)?

 

You can take full advantage of the Microsoft office applications, such as Word and Excel, with their full functionality, directly from your web browser.

 

Also, you get 7GB of free storage. If you decide you want more than that, it's also the cheapest per GB. A mere £6 for an extra 20GB per year.

 

It can also sync your files as like Dropbox.

 

Not sure about what SkyDrive's limitations are when compared to Dropbox/Google Drive.

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By merlyn
26th Nov 2012 20:51

Rackspace

You could also consider using Rackspace cloud for file sharing, it costs 1p per gig, per month and can be used with a load of open source utils like CloudBerry Explorer to sync files automatically.

 

 

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