Email signature and designatory letters

Email signature and designatory letters

Didn't find your answer?

Out of interest do any of you show your designatory letters in your email signatures?

I'm going to update my email signature and it seems short and sweet is now much more the norm.

 

Replies (19)

Please login or register to join the discussion.

By cheekychappy
21st Sep 2016 14:58

I drop my letters so that I do not look like a pretentious see you next Tuesday.

Thanks (1)
avatar
By Mr_awol
21st Sep 2016 15:03

I don't include mine.

I think it depends how you lay the signature out. Ive always had standardised signatures for all staff and ended my emails with 'regards, name'.

If you've got a signature that incorporates your name/contact details, in a separate font, etc then I suppose its acceptable to have the letters there.

Basically, if it looks the same as it would if you manually typed the letters out each time, then you're going to look like a dick.

Thanks (1)
Replying to Mr_awol:
Tornado
By Tornado
22nd Sep 2016 00:25

HMRC have worried me a bit recently where on the few occasions I have been able to communicate with them by email, the officers have been signing off with 'Regards xxx'

Is this some fiendish ploy to get me to like them so that it is easier to extract more money from my clients or is this just a genuine laid back approach to communication by email.

I used to tell clients that you could spot a scam email supposedly from HMRC because if it signs off with anything other than 'Yours Sincerely' then it must be a scam. I may have to rethink that advice.

Thanks (0)
Replying to Tornado:
RLI
By lionofludesch
22nd Sep 2016 08:23

Tornado wrote:

HMRC have worried me a bit recently where on the few occasions I have been able to communicate with them by email, the officers have been signing off with 'Regards xxx'

xxx??

That's a little bit over-familiar !

Thanks (1)
Replying to lionofludesch:
Tornado
By Tornado
22nd Sep 2016 15:54

lionofludesch wrote:

Tornado wrote:

HMRC have worried me a bit recently where on the few occasions I have been able to communicate with them by email, the officers have been signing off with 'Regards xxx'

xxx??

That's a little bit over-familiar !

I have a client who always ends her emails with a X. I had a bit of a hard time convincing my wife that there was nothing in it but all is OK now. At least she hasn't picked up on my affair with the Tax Inspector yet and the varying designatory letters after my name on those emails such as : BURMA, SWALK, ITALY, etc

Thanks (2)
Replying to Tornado:
avatar
By SKCOX
23rd Sep 2016 12:20

NORWICH has to be the best one.

Thanks (0)
Replying to SKCOX:
avatar
By SimonLever
26th Sep 2016 12:25

SKCOX wrote:

NORWICH has to be the best one.

Don't you mean KORWICH ?

Thanks (0)
Replying to Tornado:
avatar
By gogabz51
23rd Sep 2016 10:39

Hi Tornado,

Are you sure you're speaking to HMRC??!!

xxx

Thanks (0)
Replying to Tornado:
avatar
By Flustered
23rd Sep 2016 19:44

Well, at least it is not "XXXX Jo Bloggs HMRC"!!

Thanks (0)
RLI
By lionofludesch
21st Sep 2016 19:46

No

Thanks (0)
By JCresswellTax
22nd Sep 2016 09:32

I think it depends and I have two signatures:

1. An informal one, signed with my first name only and no letters, for clients I know.

2. A formal signature with my full name, job title and letters, for sending to prospective clients, banks etc.

Seems to work ok.

Thanks (0)
Replying to JCresswellTax:
avatar
By happy
22nd Sep 2016 09:43

What a good idea thank you

Thanks (0)
paddle steamer
By DJKL
22nd Sep 2016 10:07

On a work e mail I would not put any letters, however for more formal private practice communications I would likely be using a pre printed letterhead which does, buried in the small print at the foot, have my name and qualifications printed.

Even the most recent incarnation of my practice business cards have dropped stating qualifications and I now cannot remember if that was the same re the previous printing, certainly my work business cards have never had qualifications over the last seventeen years.

I suspect someone, somewhere, has already earned an MSc or Phd by examining the prevalence of use of letters and its correlation with age, personality type etc.

My theory (maybe I should write a thesis when I retire) is that when first received most people want to use them, certainly my business cards when working full time in practice up to 1999 had qualifications stated, but as the individuals age these badges of achievement possibly lose significance. However there may then be a reversal of this attitude as the individuals further age and retire, maybe at this juncture their lack of occupation increases the importance of the qualifications in the mind of the individual (measure of worth) or maybe it is the association of the qualifications with their more youthful selves. (nostalgia- they can remember when putting on socks was simple)

My thesis is to be based upon a sample of one subject and research will likely be finished in about 10-20 years time; it is unlikely it will ever be published.

Thanks (2)
Routemaster image
By tom123
22nd Sep 2016 12:01

I have my letters on my business cards, but not on email signature.

I have two signatures - one which is for the first email, and includes full business address etc, and then a simplified one for replies once the chain is going.

If I ever get round to applying for FCMA (which, if I am honest is a bit of a faff - given that CIMA seems to think everyone is working in nice ivory tower 'strategic' jobs) then I suspect I will use those letters for a while until the novelty wears off.

(remembers the temptation to use my degree letters all those years ago)

Thanks (1)
7om
By Tom 7000
23rd Sep 2016 17:04

You worked hard, pop them in the more you have the cleverer you are ;)

I am working on my KCMG

Thanks (0)
Replying to Tom 7000:
paddle steamer
By DJKL
23rd Sep 2016 17:06

Surely you want GCMG. (God calls me God)

Thanks (0)
Replying to DJKL:
Tornado
By Tornado
23rd Sep 2016 17:26

DJKL wrote:

Surely you want GCMG. (God calls me God)

How sad that I enjoy the reruns of Yes Minister on the Yesterday Channel, where little gems like this remind us of life within the civil service.

One of my clients always calls me Sir Humphrey. I have not yet decided if this is an insult or a compliment.

Thanks (0)
Tornado
By Tornado
23rd Sep 2016 20:36

Just to put the record straight .. when I said that emails from HMRC were signed off 'Regards xxx'. the xxx was meant to signify the name of the officer and not his/her affection that they had for me ... but I think you all knew that anyway.

Thanks (1)
Replying to Tornado:
paddle steamer
By DJKL
26th Sep 2016 12:39

That is a real shame, you could have honestly included within your firm's marketing material that they enjoyed a "very special relationship" with HMRC, in effect friends with benefits in kind.

Thanks (0)