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Help, I don't need this money!

Didn't find your answer?

Got the below email. I don't want "HMRC's" £158.43. Any suggestions what I can tell them to do with it?

Buy some flowers for the lady in reception who sometimes gets too busy to answer the phone?
Hire a good lawyer to make Google & Starbucks pay their fair share of tax?
Do a Groupon deal for all HMRC staff to attend Specsavers?

Something else?

email from HMRC

Replies (15)

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By atleastisoundknowledgable...
16th Sep 2019 06:40

Well at least it’s early warning that you need to file your 18/19 return.

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RLI
By lionofludesch
16th Sep 2019 08:15

What makes it so plausible is the "Dear Customer" bit.

Only HMRC would call a taxpayer a customer.

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Replying to lionofludesch:
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By Tax Dragon
16th Sep 2019 08:22

"Fiscal activity."

Does Mrbailey have a new job?

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Replying to Tax Dragon:
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By thomas34
16th Sep 2019 13:19

My first thought too - Mr Bailey's word of the year.

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By SXGuy
16th Sep 2019 08:41

which part gives it away? the repayment within 4 to 10 days haha

Thanks (3)
Universe
By SteveOH
16th Sep 2019 09:36

Hey, £158.43 is not to be sneezed at. I would reply forthwith and enjoy your winnings.

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By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
16th Sep 2019 10:03

Apparently these are deliberately misspelled and poorly written in order to draw up a "suckers list" of those gullible enough to respond. Probably those who are are either elderly, have dementia, or just a bit thick.

Its not worth the scammers time and effort for anyone who is aware of what is going on as (a) we might well play them along for fun (I have done this before when I was on long term sick, I convinced someone in Nigeria I was at the airport, and looking for them) , and (b) should we fall for it, then would take steps in terms of following through on fraud reports and closing accounts etc so they cant skim them.

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Replying to ireallyshouldknowthisbut:
By SteLacca
16th Sep 2019 10:16

Doesn't always work that way. Got one of the fake calls from Microsoft last Thursday, and when I called him out for being a scammer he got most upset. He didn't seem to like it when I explained in detail what he intended to do and how he intended to do it.

Didn't stop them trying again three times the following day.

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Replying to ireallyshouldknowthisbut:
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By Clinton Lee
16th Sep 2019 11:14

Possibly. But methinks you credit the scammers with more intelligence than they possess.

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By 356B
16th Sep 2019 12:45

If everybody responded to these emails with fictitious details, the scammers would soon give up and go away. (Send out 3 million emails, get 2,990,000 back)

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Replying to 356B:
RLI
By lionofludesch
16th Sep 2019 13:00

Much more likely that clicking on the link downloads some malware so it won't matter how fictitious your details are.

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Replying to lionofludesch:
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By Tax Dragon
16th Sep 2019 14:12

Our thoughts appear to be merging.

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Replying to Tax Dragon:
RLI
By lionofludesch
16th Sep 2019 14:21

Fools seldom differ.

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Replying to lionofludesch:
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By Tax Dragon
16th Sep 2019 14:45

If you know what a relief it is to me that the explanation is so mundane (not at all Dr Who-esque)… then... wait... then the explanation is not so mundane! Arrrgh... at least one of us is going mad!

I shouldn't have (mentally) clicked that link... my mind is corrupting...

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By Tax Dragon
16th Sep 2019 12:59

Why are you all thinking it's a scam?

I'm thinking it's an invitation to download a virus by clicking on a link.

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