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HMRC does live in a different time zone!

HMRC received a tax return nearly an hour before I filed it

Didn't find your answer?

At 09:43 this morning I clicked the "submit to HMRC" icon on the tax return software.

A few seconds later I received message saying "Time accepted: 17.07.2020 at 08:44:30 AM"

Good innit

Replies (10)

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By Paul Crowley
17th Jul 2020 12:46

Summertime

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By Paul D Utherone
17th Jul 2020 13:08

They never adjust for summertime :)

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Ivor Windybottom
By Ivor Windybottom
17th Jul 2020 15:22

Covid distancing, I believe.

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RLI
By lionofludesch
17th Jul 2020 16:04

Yes - they're on GMT.

More correctly known as Universal Time. The official time of the whole world.

Remember that when you see these fools in Australia setting off their fireworks on Sydney Harbour Bridge at one in the afternoon on New Year's Eve.

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Replying to lionofludesch:
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By Paul Crowley
17th Jul 2020 16:23

Even worse they do it in the summer

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Replying to Paul Crowley:
RLI
By lionofludesch
17th Jul 2020 16:39

Nah - they'd only be ten hours out.

Depends whose summer, obviously.

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By Comptable
18th Jul 2020 14:20

It makes sense then.
Summer time started about 100 years ago and our tax system is really designed for that era rather than the 21st century.

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RLI
By lionofludesch
18th Jul 2020 14:35

Summer time cops a lot of flak, yet there's a lot of countries outside the tropics who still choose to use it.

Which is because it's a good system.

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By johnhemming
18th Jul 2020 18:28

In an sense we are lucky as a country in that we started the whole business with longitude measurement at sea and as a result UTC is the same as GMT. However, computers need to know the time. They often measure the time in milliseconds since 1st January 1970. However, because human beings don't really recognise that computer systems change time measurements into years, months, days, hours, minutes, seconds and sometimes less than seconds (there are now banking systems that time transactions to the millisecond).

What computers do, therefore, is to know the time in GMT/UTC and then report it in the local time (BST, CET, etc).

That is what HMRC are doing. You do get situations when computers have the time out by a few milliseconds or longer and that can cause transactions between computers to fail. However, I don't think HMRC can be criticised for using UTC.

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By SXGuy
18th Jul 2020 19:16

Try it at 00:00 on 1st Feb see what happens.

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