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HMRC's heavyweight (108 stone) retiree

Suitable retirement home sought - "will require careful handling and strong flooring"

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Shame you can't attach pictures here, but there's a lovely picture of the Stamp Duty press machines being decommissioned by HMRC at https://www.gov.uk/government/news/end-of-an-era-as-stamp-presses-decomm...

They're possibly HMRC's longest serving functionaries, having been in continuous use for over 100 years, and ... you too can have one (possibly)!

I suppose they're also the most visible thing to succumb to digitisation at HMRC.

Anyway, a little fun for the weekend ... no thinking required (although daydreams are allowed).

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By Paul Crowley
19th Jun 2021 12:39

Same day that lockdown supposedly stops
And same day that June PAYE needs to be paid

Spooky

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Maytuna
By DJKL
19th Jun 2021 16:08

I will take the trouble with this to ping it to my daughter in law who is an Exhibition Coordinator at the Smithsonian Cooper Hewitt in New York, whilst likely not totally suitable for a Museum of Design if the Brits cannot find a home for one of them I am sure one of the US museums might consider taking one as she likely has a few contacts with other museums in New York and Washington.

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By Hugo Fair
19th Jun 2021 16:24

Good luck ... maybe Rishi could donate it to help cement the special relationship.

I find it a thing of beauty - despite, or possibly because of, the degree of over-engineering involved. No paring the last ounce of metalwork, when a flourish can add a soupçon of je ne sais quoi!

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Replying to Hugo Fair:
Maytuna
By DJKL
19th Jun 2021 19:44

A lot of old machinery is like that.

Even some more mundane stamping machines are attractive, I have lying about three company seals that make great bookends or paperweights and have a very pleasant heft.

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By I'msorryIhaven'taclue
19th Jun 2021 20:06

I still have a "practice stamp" that presses an embossment into paper, similar to an old "company seal" stamp. Mortgage references and the like used to require just such a "practice stamp", as I'm sure you'll recall; although I seem to remember having to make our version II stamp using Photoshop, as our embossed stamp simply wasn't photocopiable.

Didn't Germany do well this evening! 4-2 against the reigning champs. Makes you suddenly aware that the English (and, for that matter, Scottish) goals are a little thin on the ground.

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By Hugo Fair
19th Jun 2021 22:03

Even after a LOT of de-cluttering (old acoustic-coupler 'luggable' terminal being my favourite from the late '70s), I still have several company seals (including for extinct businesses) - some as a single heavyweight device, the slightly more recent as the two-sided bit that can be slid into the Press.
I also still have a 1930s embosser that produces my address (useful if you want posh letterheads at no cost) and loads of other office equipment (from heat binders to staplers for A3 pages so that when folded you have an A4 magazine).
And of course, slide-rules, calculators, graph and tracing paper, etc.

I should be embarrassed by all this ... but (pre-covid) strangers would come to my door saying they'd heard I had some Tippex (or Dymo tape or Treasury tags or ..) that they could 'borrow' and were always amazed that I knew where the item was.

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Maytuna
By DJKL
20th Jun 2021 12:58

I am still a firm believer in treasury tags, I use them for filing invoices/bank statements etc in boxes as you can get far more into a storage box if it is not in a lever arch file and you save money by reusing the lever arch files rather than buying new ones each year.

I also have a fondness for legal stationery etc , solicitors' wallets with the pink tape fastening , an unused Twinlock ledger (hard cover metal corners) containing minute paper and with my father's firm trustee limited company name embossed into the cover and somewhere I also have a unused half calf leather A3 ledger which also came out of my father's office.

The most interesting bits and bobs collected are the bundle of partnership agreements dating from the 1830s onwards to the 1970s plus some stitched together legal accounts from the 40s and a front loading metal deed box with the firm name painted on the door.

I

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