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How did you first say it?

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There are seven (!) different ways to pronounce words with "ough" in them, for example:

1. Though

2. Through

3. Cough

4. Rough

5. Plough

6. Ought

7. Borough

I'd never heard of the word "furlough" before, and must admit before hearing it in hearing it on television I was using number five!

Are there any accountants willing to stick their necks out and admit to which number they first used? Or any smug ones who got number one right first time?

Replies (19)

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By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
03rd Apr 2020 11:16

i've been using a small dog, ie fur-low

But given the north/south divide over bath, scone and grass I guess it may vary regionally.

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Replying to ireallyshouldknowthisbut:
Routemaster image
By tom123
03rd Apr 2020 11:37

same

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Replying to ireallyshouldknowthisbut:
boat
By SouthCoastAcc
03rd Apr 2020 11:43

same again

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Replying to ireallyshouldknowthisbut:
Caroline
By accountantccole
03rd Apr 2020 13:09

I sent a picture of a fluffy cat on its back to our payroll lady who was stuggling with pronunciation. I vote fur low too

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Replying to ireallyshouldknowthisbut:
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By Open all hours
03rd Apr 2020 14:21

Spot on. It’s a word my father used to use in the 1960’s. Shame he died just before it became fashionable.

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By Rt66
03rd Apr 2020 11:29

I would also have used number 5

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By cathygrimmer
03rd Apr 2020 11:38

Smug here - but then I had heard the word before so I can't claim I'm super clever and just instinctively knew!

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By Duggimon
03rd Apr 2020 11:55

I've been using number one this whole time, though I now realise I haven't heard anyone say it to whom I haven't first said it, so now I don't know if I'm saying it right or if I'm saying it wrong and everyone I say it to is copying me.

I get all my news online, in text so that's no help.

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By Truthsayer
03rd Apr 2020 12:04

I first heard the word a decade ago, so I already knew the pronunciation.

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By SteLacca
03rd Apr 2020 13:09

I used to watch Phil Silvers as Sgt Bilko. It came up a lot in that, so I already knew the correct pronunciation.

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By Paul D Utherone
03rd Apr 2020 13:36

1 for me

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By mbee1
03rd Apr 2020 15:09

I'd only ever heard it when watching US TV programmes hence I associate it as an Americanism. I'm not a fan of America, Americans or the Americanisms creeping into our language so I loath the word.

Apologies to any Americans reading this as you're probably very nice.

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Replying to mbee1:
By SteLacca
03rd Apr 2020 15:25

Or loud and ignorant. There tends to be no in between.

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Replying to mbee1:
RLI
By lionofludesch
05th Apr 2020 18:52

mbee1 wrote:

I'd only ever heard it when watching US TV programmes hence I associate it as an Americanism. I'm not a fan of America, Americans or the Americanisms creeping into our language so I loath the word.

Apologies to any Americans reading this as you're probably very nice.


Dutch word, apparently.
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By ruth.julian
03rd Apr 2020 18:06

My father used to have a year's furlough every 5 years. He was also paid a stipend for his work.

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Oaklea
By Chris.Mann
04th Apr 2020 22:31

I like to become an impressionist, or actor, with new words, like this.

I adopted a North Eastern accent for this one: furrlow with the L being the most prominent.

I do this with my granddaughters. Barth (for bath). Batter (for butter) and grarss (grass). Anything to make them have fun learning.

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By AWeb72
05th Apr 2020 18:23

Number 1

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RLI
By lionofludesch
05th Apr 2020 18:52

I pronounced it Fur Low. But then, I'm old enough to remember Bilko.

You missed off lough, by the way. It's an English word, not Irish, contrary to popular belief.

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