How to prospect Mrs Mop

Looking for a payroll bureau

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Mrs Mop rang me recently. Very interesting, bright person, doing specialised cleaning jobs with a staff of 75.
She's not happy with her current accountants who do bookkeeping, tax and payroll. There's no way I'd take on a payroll for 75 cleaning staff.

For a start she wouldn't want to pay my much higher fees for that.
If she could find a separate payroll bureau that would open the door for me. But I'm dubious as to how good independent payroll bureaux are.
Can you recommend any?

Replies (10)

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By ABC12
05th Feb 2023 19:16

I've sent a message

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By Hugo Fair
05th Feb 2023 19:33

Do you mean "a staff of 75" (as in 75 people employed concurrently and consistently)? Or a peripatetic pool of 75 workers to whom work is doled out on a zero hours basis?

Might sound pedantic, but very different in the impact on obtaining & processing payroll data - and on all the associated tasks (from onboarding through to payslips etc).

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Replying to Hugo Fair:
By Moonbeam
06th Feb 2023 09:13

I don't have any more information at this stage, but having done smaller payrolls for this type of client I would imagine there are going to be lots of comings and goings and lots of different hours.

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Replying to Moonbeam:
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By Hugo Fair
06th Feb 2023 13:38

Which is what I also suspected ... in which case a lot will depend on the options within your software and of course on how much you can tie-down an SLA with the client.

A good SLA should have clear and unambiguous responsibilities set out for both parties - and, in this environment, needs to cover much more than merely a cut-off date/time for receipt of hours.
For instance, there's a need for a separate cut-off for notification of new starters (with *full* details), and for leavers (as opposed to ongoing but no hours this pay period). And clear procedures for who does what when any deadline is missed.

As NeilTonks mentions, the more you are paying actual rather than estimated hours the better ... but even that can be software-dependent. My old software used to allow clock-in/out spreadsheets to be submitted at any time and took care of everything:
* it posted every work item into a database table per employee and then checked whether each item was brand new to the Payroll or an amendment to a previously notified item - and updated the database appropriately
* when the payroll was processed, any work items not already paid (but before a 'cut-off' parameter fed to the whole payroll) were marked as paid - and included in that period's processing
* it also had other capabilities - such as making appropriate corrections, where the adjusted work items now meant that over or under payment had occurred in an earlier pay period

Of course the licence for this kind of software was in the multiples of £10k ... so unfortunately of no help here!

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By petersaxton
05th Feb 2023 20:59

Why should there be a problem if you lay down timetables for information required?
I used to get £3,000 for one day's work at payroll year end.

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Replying to petersaxton:
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By SXGuy
06th Feb 2023 07:50

I agree. If they were to provide the hours during the middle of the month for the hours worked in the prev month, no issue. But if they want to be paid the last Friday of the month for hours worked up to that Friday. No thank you.

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Replying to SXGuy:
By petersaxton
06th Feb 2023 08:05

That is ridiculous.

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Replying to petersaxton:
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By neiltonks
06th Feb 2023 08:39

I've come across that in the past: basically, pay the last week of the month based on estimated hours and then the next month you pay the actual hours for that week and recover the estimated value. It can be a fair bit of work unless the payroll system can be set up to calculate and recover the estimates and that in turn depends on whether the estimate can be calculated based on the history, or needs human knowledge. It's much easier just to operate the payroll a week in arrears!

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By Roland195
06th Feb 2023 10:12

I'd be prepared to bet that for 75 peripatetic (who needs word of the day toilet paper) employees, the payroll run will diverge from the amounts due/paid from the financial accountants with the scale of the difference being proportionate to the costs of the Payroll Bureau.

You'd have to be careful that you don't end up bearing the costs of fixing this particularly as your client is already sensitive to price.

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By hje
06th Feb 2023 13:45

PM Sent

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