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IRIS Payroll

IRIS Payroll

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We have used IRIS for years.  It's expensive but tbh it is a good product.

With the new living wage for over 25 years coming it would make sense for IRIS to prompt us if an employee's would be affected by this or any minimum wage increase.

Spoke to IRIS and this does not happen!!!

So we then need to go through every single employer to see if any of the employees are affected by this every time the NMW changes.  This is very time consuming.

Do any of the other payroll systems do this?

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17th Mar 2016 10:35

Sage Payroll warned you.

I've just started using BrightPay so I may know soon.

My view is that you need to know well before. Can't you run a report that could help you to identify changes required?

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By Kazmc
17th Mar 2016 10:54

We use IRIS Payroll Professional

same here, we are wading through all our client payrolls trying to identify who is affected!

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17th Mar 2016 11:17

Export

Surely on any system worth it's salt you can export a csv file, sort by payment amount and perhaps other filters (age etc) and there you go - a list of who is below the NMW etc.  How hard can it be?

If you can't export to either csv or similar then change the software

 

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By Kazmc
17th Mar 2016 11:28

Yes you can...

landscaper wrote:

Surely on any system worth it's salt you can export a csv file, sort by payment amount and perhaps other filters (age etc) and there you go - a list of who is below the NMW etc.  How hard can it be?

If you can't export to either csv or similar then change the software

 

Yes you can, but rather a laborious task when you are running 350 payrolls and every one has to be done separately!

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17th Mar 2016 11:51

Hourly or monthly pay?

It is easy enough where staff are paid by the hour to extract a report showing the hourly rates, perhaps even filtered to exclude those over £7.20 and those under 25 - and just as easy for the software providers to program a warning.

It is probably more difficult where staff are paid by the month as it will be necessary to record the working hours correctly and perform a calculation to work out the hourly rate.

I would expect the employer to have personnel files from which the relevant data can be extracted more easily - indeed, isn't it the employer's responsibility rather than the payroll bureau to comply with this new law?  Do payroll bureaux check that the minimum paid holiday entitlement is taken - I suspect that most leave it to the employer.

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By Kazmc
17th Mar 2016 11:58

.

Euan MacLennan wrote:

It is easy enough where staff are paid by the hour to extract a report showing the hourly rates, perhaps even filtered to exclude those over £7.20 and those under 25 - and just as easy for the software providers to program a warning.

It is probably more difficult where staff are paid by the month as it will be necessary to record the working hours correctly and perform a calculation to work out the hourly rate.

I would expect the employer to have personnel files from which the relevant data can be extracted more easily - indeed, isn't it the employer's responsibility rather than the payroll bureau to comply with this new law?  Do payroll bureaux check that the minimum paid holiday entitlement is taken - I suspect that most leave it to the employer.

Unfortunately within IRIS you cannot log actual hours worked, just the bands within which they fall (For RTI/UC reporting reasons). We do try and make sure our clients keep up with the correct NMW & in future the NLW even though it is ultimately the employers responsibility. Most of ours are monthly paid clients as well which makes monitoring increases and changes more time consuming. 

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By Mallock
17th Mar 2016 12:04

Monthly salaries are a nightmare

We use Sage and it gives a NMW warning.

However having looked at this in detail there are real practical problems with the application of NMW regulations. Basically, you can't pay staff monthly under NMW unless they have lying time. Telling the poorest paid that they are going to have to have one or two weeks unpaid as lying time seems daft to me.

If staff work 40hrs a week at NMW, you cannot give them a monthly salary of 40hrs x NMW x 52 weeks divided by 12 because in the pay period (the month) they will have been paid less than NMW for some months when there are 31 days and each pay period needs to be viewed on its own.

You also can't prepare salaries monthly, using the actual hours for the first 3 weeks of the month and an assumption that the staff will appear as normal in the last week - usually any days of absence in the last week would be deducted in the next month but under NMW regulations that would be deemed to be an underpayment for the following month.

It is of course all bureaucratic nonsense which increases costs and complexity for small businesses who are supposed to be getting simplification. The reality is that the staff are getting paid NMW for every hour they work, it's just the timing of the wages payments which is slightly different. Throw in AE and you can see why small businesses are stressed.

 

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