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Kinesthetic learning - anyone tried it?

It's been suggested I may be a kinesthetic learner - anyone have any learning tips?

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Hi all

So long story short a couple of mental health professionals over the years have told me they are pretty confident I'm a kinesthetic learner (as opposed to visual or auditory - so my brain processes actions much better than visual or auditory signals, meaning if you give me something to put together by hand I can then do it blindfolded, but if you ask me to repeat what someone just said or something I just read you will be disappointed).  I've had a read and tend to agree (though that could just be confirmation bias), especially as my co-workers make fun of me for quirks which are indicators of a kinesthetic mind.

My issue is, assuming of course that I am a K learner, is that I don't know how to fit it to our type of learning - i.e. academia.  I don't see how I can incorporate a physical act into my learning process, as finance is very hands off (beyond typing).

Just wondered if anyone has tried to use K learning in accountancy/tax/finance and how they go about it.  'Amusingly' I've ended up in a very unsuitable career for my learning style...  Apparently the worst thing you can be is sat at a desk doing purely mental activities :|

Oh, and I got through my exams by reading the book a couple of times then doing nothing but questions, which isn't practical outside an exam setting.

Thanks all

Replies (10)

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By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
02nd Jul 2020 11:35

Dunno, I could never deal with sports teacher taking you through an action which I guess would work for you.

But I imagine "doing worked examples" of any text you read is probably as close as you can get short of building a double entry machine in your office in which you move numbers from side to side!

I can tell you one thing people who worry about what they cant do are normally pretty good at it. Its the ones who think they know stuff who fall on their backside the hardest. I say that as a reasonably self aware person who thinks they know stuff. Then it turns out I dont.

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Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
02nd Jul 2020 11:48

For accountancy past papers was always the way to go at university and the professional exams with ICAS were similar, do question, rinse, repeat.

I suspect the final stages when you are pulling together the different skills within one big question is more going to be the tricky bit for you, as the number of perms of the individual skills required will increase massively.

However it is really little different than say maths, school maths you differentiate or integrate something, if it is trickier maybe you need to first change an expression then do a straightforward dy/dx, but as you advance things get tougher as you combine the basic skills acquired.

When my kids were doing their AH maths the trick was look at the question, works out which combination of maths tools (Maclaurin/Taylor etc) were needed, apply them in the correct order, both of mine found that tricky ( I , despite having done first year university maths in my first degree ,also found it tricky, in fact near impossible as I would now be lucky to pass O Level Maths- we got them tutors)

I think the key will be spotting patterns and then break the pattern down into the functions you are comfortable performing, but that may be easier said than done.

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Quack
By Constantly Confused
02nd Jul 2020 12:27

Thanks both. To be clear my exam days are long done, that was just the best example I could find to illustrate how I think I could apply 'hands on' methods. But I agree, it's not ideal!

I'm going to read a book or two and see if I can jury-rig (oh no, is it jerry-rig?!? see my post in the moderation thread about incorrect use of phrases!) a strategy that works for me.

Right, off to buy a model kit :)

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Replying to Constantly Confused:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
02nd Jul 2020 12:53

My exam days also, I have a head like mince these days.

A number of years ago I struck a deal with my other half, I supported and paid for her to go back to university to take an Msc, she was then supposed to do likewise for me though I suspect I would have done another undergraduate degree, probably English/History. Roll on to when this might happen and I now appreciate that whilst I might still do fine if all continuous assessment if I had to site an exam which involved me remembering things I am toast, what was my strongest skill when younger (I had a quick memory) is now no more (unless learned 35-45 years ago, some of those bits have stuck)

Model kits are actually still great fun, have you tried scratchbuilding or kit bashing? I have recently returned to railway modelling and been playing about with an old Airfix crane to convert the cab into a small boatyard crane that will hopefully turn using a servo, I have also half scratchbuilt a model wooden jetty for the same area on a railway layout I am building, combining electronics with models is great fun e.g.I have a circuit kit that simulates welding light to combine with some boatyard welders . It has been one of my activities to keep me sane during lockdown.

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Replying to DJKL:
Quack
By Constantly Confused
02nd Jul 2020 13:38

I'd love a train set to build a world around, maybe in the next house.

On the basis I'm running out of room for models I thought I'd be clever and give cross stitch a go! So I have a kit on its way :)

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Replying to Constantly Confused:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
02nd Jul 2020 14:00

I have partially overcome that by trying OO9, tight curves are possible so smaller space is needed, 250 cm long, 66 cm and I can fit an oval.

My inspiration re style (though not layout) is this layout especially the Dunalistair section.

http://www.009dutch.nl/cdr/

Now if son does manage to get married and departs, and we decide not to move and his room comes free, I have boxes and boxes of stored three rail Dublo stuff from the 1950s/60s, but suspect my other half will want a guest bedroom.

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Replying to DJKL:
Scooby
By gainsborough
02nd Jul 2020 14:34

Are you going to put "chance to marry my son" on the Opportunities tab if it comes back then DJKL :)?

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Replying to gainsborough:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
02nd Jul 2020 22:36

He has that bit sorted, he is engaged to an American girl but Covid rather interrupted the timetable.

He was due to legally get married in May here in Scotland to start the emigration process to move to live and work in New York where his intended works, as apparently it can take a bit of time after marrying an American citizen( up to a year)to sort the paperwork.

The wedding party "event" is all booked here in Scotland in October but how that will work out re happening, guests from here and USA coming over/ staying / returning home, is now anyone's guess.

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Replying to DJKL:
Red Leader
By Red Leader
02nd Jul 2020 16:20

Peco always seemed to be the ultimate for model railway enthusiasts when I were a lad.
https://peco-uk.com/pages/peco

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Replying to Red Leader:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
02nd Jul 2020 22:44

They are nice but I have , apart from the OO9, gone more retro with a nice collection, currently all stored in boxes, of older Hornby Dublo plus a few Wrenn; the metal bodies /tinplate coaches have a satisfying heft and they seem to hold their value, I have also amassed a fair few for restoration and they are simply made and you do nor, like Triang and later Hornby, have to track down myriad spares to rebuild them.

I more fancy something like this:

https://www.alansmeccano.org/models/HornbyDublo01.htm

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