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Leaving before 3 month notice period

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Hi all,

started job at a company last year as a trainee accountant in 15k increased to 16k this year. handed my notice 6 weeks ago as neither the pay was good  nor there was a progression opportunity. my new company wants me to start in Jan, current ceo says he will sue me and the company. Doesnot want to listen to any reasonings. there is a new book keeper and a apprentice like me joining in jan. Company has a account manager who comes in 2 times a week. I have written a guide on all my tasks, and also trying to train another trainee who does not work for the company i am leaving for ( he has two companies) but has plenty of free time but got scolded saying who gave u permission to train them by the boss. Sometimes i feel like walking out. No one will wait for three months for a accountant in a junior position. 

If he sues me, what can he sue me for? right now i dont feel like working anymore. All employees are great, it is just the ceo that always have problem with employees leaving or treating them properly. 

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By JDBENJAMIN
18th Dec 2019 14:44

You have not given anything like the information needed to advise. What is your employer saying are his grounds for suing? Has he said anything at all? Merely not giving the full contractual notice could only possibly be grounds for suing if the employer can show it caused a loss.

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RLI
By lionofludesch
18th Dec 2019 14:45

Stick it out until your next payday and then leave. Don't give them an excuse not to pay you.

Keep a diary of all the bullying. If they do sue you (pretty unlikely), it'll be good evidence. If you can leave your phone on "record" whilst one of these "scoldings" is going on, that'll be helpful too. Three months notice for someone on your pay grade is, in itself, an unreasonable contract term.

The fact that you've prepared a list of your tasks shows you've done your best to be reasonable.

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By kestrepo
18th Dec 2019 15:09

Your notice period will be specified in your signed contract of employment and you should really work your notice period. If you do not you could be in breach of contract. It is true that your employer could take you to court for damages but I suspect any damage will be very difficult to prove and costly as well as time consuming to pursue.

If the timings are correct then you will have worked 8 weeks of your 12 weeks notice period by the start of January already. Do you have any leave/holiday left to use up?

For more guidance try having a look at the link below:

https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/work/leaving-a-job/resigning/your-noti...

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Lone Wolf
By Lone_Wolf
18th Dec 2019 15:34

Wait til pay day and just walk. I'm willing to bet he doesn't sue you.

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Replying to Lone_Wolf:
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By memyself-eye
18th Dec 2019 18:26

Exactly - the employer will not want a disgruntled and disruptive employee F*cking up his business.

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By Rammstein1
18th Dec 2019 16:39

Is it because he needs you in January for some urgent work? Why did you sign a contract with a three month notice period if you didn't want to stick to it?

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Replying to Rammstein1:
RLI
By lionofludesch
18th Dec 2019 16:46

Quote:

Is it because he needs you in January for some urgent work? Why did you sign a contract with a three month notice period if you didn't want to stick to it?

Bullied into it ?

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Replying to lionofludesch:
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By Rammstein1
18th Dec 2019 16:53

I've signed a three month notice period a couple of times because it gave me job security. If they wanted to get rid of me, I would have got three months pay.

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Replying to Rammstein1:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
18th Dec 2019 17:26

Agreed, when I left my last employer to move here I got three months notice at the outset from my new employer (well I had security in my previous position and they had approached me rather than other way round) which we agreed would increase by one month for every year of service up to twelve months, so now, after twenty years here, I am on twelve months notice (both ways, employer to me and me to employer), but I will likely never fully leave; when it comes time to totally hang up the calculator I will probably just become a non exec, attend 3-4 meetings a year and get a free lunch where I spout total nonsense. (so not much change there)

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By bernard michael
19th Dec 2019 10:16

Quote:

I've signed a three month notice period a couple of times because it gave me job security. If they wanted to get rid of me, I would have got three months pay.

Yes but now vice versa applies.

Seriously I doubt any solicitor would advise him to sue you because you left 1 month early. It would laughed out of court. He's just blustering

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