Share this content
29

Microsoft Office pain!

Microsoft Office pain!

Didn't find your answer?

I am currently looking at accounting/tax software and their system requirements.

As I do not curently have any version of Excel my options are Office 2013 or Office 365. Office 2013 (Home and Business) is a 1PC licence and sells for asbout £220 and as I have a desktop and laptop I will need to spend £440. It also appears that the licence dies when your machine does i..e new machine = another £220. This seems utterly greedy to me, especially as Office 2010 was a 2PC licence with a lot more transfer flexibility.

So, I am looking at Office 365 as you rent the software as a combination of desktop and cloud (you can use both/either). This works out at £100 p.a. for up to 25 users on one licence. If neither of my computers die in the next 4 years then it's expensive - if either/both die or are upgraded then it's a bargain.

On top of this, my prefered VT software will not run on 365. This potentially makes using VT a lot more expensive than I would like.

My dilema is, do I cough up £440 to use VT or do I look elsewhere (I have just emailed Taxcalc to see if they are ok with Office 365). I have also tried desperately to find a copy of Office 2010 but this is no longer available (There are a few copies here and there at highly inflated prices and from internet sellers I'm unure about).

In the scheme of things this is probably a small hurdle to jump but right now it feels like a right royal pain!

Replies (29)

Please login or register to join the discussion.

Locutus of Borg
By Locutus
14th Aug 2013 10:30

Libre Office or Open Office
Why not try Libra Office or Open Office first. They are both free, so nothing to use. They also don't have that horrible Ribbon Interface nonsense!

I've trialled Libre Office a bit and it is able to open and save in all MS formats, although some problems for me with password protected documents opening the .xlsx and .docx formats that were originally produced in Excel and Word.

EDIT: I initially missed the comment about VT integration. I doubt whether VT works with Libre Office or Open Office.

Thanks (0)
By johnrichardson
13th Aug 2013 15:35

You can transfer office 2013

Office 2013 is transferable between computers if your computer dies. Microsoft did alter their license for this. The only limit is you cannot transfer the license more than once every 90 days. I believe Microsoft altered the licensing around March. 

I would go for Office 2013 unless you want all the other features that Office 365 offers, like skydrive storage and skype minutes.

Thanks (0)
By mrme89
13th Aug 2013 15:38

S4S

If you or any of your staff are studying try this:

http://www.software4students.co.uk/

 

 

Thanks (0)
avatar
By paulwakefield1
13th Aug 2013 17:08

VT should run

I run the subscription version of Office Professional Plus and VT is quite happy on the desktop copy.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By Liz D
13th Aug 2013 17:43

You can transfer

 Having bought a new laptop a few months ago I had the same dilemma.  I was inclined to go for Office 365 as I could then access it on my personal and business laptops as well as my windows phone.  However after trialling it I had problems trying to pay.  No matter who I spoke to they could not resolve - but they decided it was because I wanted to pay by credit card, although my card provider stated this was not the case, so I gave in and bought the Office 2013 (Home & Business) version for my business laptop.  They did confirm that was transferable as stated by John Richardson.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By Cantona1
13th Aug 2013 21:28

Office 365 is not the same as the "Full " version of excel. MS has been trying to go cloud, but it has a long way to go. Until the full version of excel features and functions can be used with office365, I would not buy an MS's products and will stick with excel 2010. Excel 2013 stinks anyway. PT is  terrible. There is a also issue with performance(Speed). So, Unless you are being forced to upgrade, I would not bother with excel 2013. There is hardly any difference between them anyway. 

Thanks (0)
avatar
By Flash Gordon
13th Aug 2013 21:47

Try Amazon?

You can get Office 2010 for 2PCs Home & Business for £264.... Save you a bit...

Thanks (0)
avatar
By paulwakefield1
14th Aug 2013 08:31

The desktop elements

of Office 365 are the full versions. I am running the full Office 365 ProPlus suite on my laptop and desktop with no performance issues. I think there are a number of incremental improvements in Excel 2013 over Excel 2010 though the look of it is awful in comparison. Perhaps the simplest and, for me, most effective improvement is being able to have spreadsheets on separate screens without having to open up multiple instances of Excel. Mind you I am also holding onto Office 2010 in case I abandon the subscription at a later date for any reason. (But then again I run Excel 97, 2003 and 2007 as well).

Thanks (0)
avatar
By merlyn
14th Aug 2013 08:50

Office

There are different options for Office 365 and the more expensive ones allow you to install office 2013 locally for use when you aren't online.

http://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/business/products/office-365.aspx

It's also worth mentioning that Office 365 also comes with hosted exchange for each user, a free domain and some webspace for your website.

For £100 per user per year it's pretty good value as office pro is over £300 and doesn't include the email hosting.

 

 

 

 

Thanks (0)
avatar
By SunTzu
14th Aug 2013 09:13

VT

I was just about to switch to 365, however I didn't realise VT did not work. Does anyone know if VT have plans to resolve this? surely they must.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By Cantona1
14th Aug 2013 14:03

Paul, I will take your words. I thought office365 is not full version.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By paulwakefield1
14th Aug 2013 14:37

I think this is true

of the Cloud element. The Office 365 offering changed with the advent of Office 2013 which has led to some confusion (I'm not fully au fait with it either). The desktop versions can be purchased as standalone which are expensive and restricted in users or via a subscription under the Office 365 banner; these are much more flexible but potentially at a long term cost though they are kept up to date and are alleged to receive more enhancements than the "boxed" version. Certainly MS are trying to drive people towards the subscription version for obvious reasons and, in the short term, have made it quite attractive. The desktop versions are fully featured though some are restricted on add ins. For instance the Inquire and Powerpivot add in can only be obtained with certain versions. Apologies for the lack of paragraphs which for some reason I am unable to insert today.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By Cantona1
14th Aug 2013 20:57

Paul, I have not bought office 365. I have read on many posts, it does not have all the features of desk top version. For e.g., Can you use the full version of VBA in office 365?

Thanks (0)
avatar
By merlyn
14th Aug 2013 21:06

Office 2013 local is 2013

Don't know about the online version of 365, but if you purchase the version where you can install locally then you actually get a full version of 2013 so get all the same features, including VBA.

 

Help/About from my Office 365 version of excel shows - Microsoft Office 2013 (15.0.4517.1004) 

 

Thanks (0)
avatar
By Irishdaz
15th Aug 2013 11:28

I've switched to Libre Office 4 (latest version) It seems to be fully compatible with Word, Excel & Powerpoint. By default it saves in Word & Excel format.It comes with Impress (their version of Powerpoint) which can be remote controlled from your smartphone when presenting off a laptop or PC. Definitely worth a look

Thanks (0)
Replying to Grayson Moore:
avatar
By Robjoy
15th Aug 2013 12:08

Libre Office file formats

Irishdaz wrote:

I've switched to Libre Office 4 (latest version) It seems to be fully compatible with Word, Excel & Powerpoint. By default it saves in Word & Excel format.It comes with Impress (their version of Powerpoint) which can be remote controlled from your smartphone when presenting off a laptop or PC. Definitely worth a look

You can change the default file formats for word processing, spreadsheets etc. Open Libre Office, go to Tools - Options - Load/Save - General.

We have installed Libre Office for a number of clients in our PC business - mostly home users reluctant to pay for MS Office. On a very few occasions they have reported problems opening MSO files - usually ones using more advanced tools and formats. Usually the file will open, but with bits missing, format up the creek or something. A nuisance, until they remember how much money they've saved. We can usually help them fix it by opening the file in MSO and simplifing things, or maybe saving as .doc/.xls rather than .docx/.xlsx

Thanks (0)
By iandc6
15th Aug 2013 11:50

Renting MS Office that's compatible with VT accounts

Hi - there is another possibility. We can rent you MS Office, but it's through a virtual server - so the costs might add up. However working in this was does give you flexible working and the software's not tied to a machine.It's also fully compatible with VT Accounts. You can use Word/Excel etc on your mobile phone if you really wanted to. Please PM me if you'd like to know more.

Thanks (0)
Replying to lionofludesch:
avatar
By chatman
15th Aug 2013 14:09

Don't use Excel on a phone

iandc6 wrote:
You can use Word/Excel etc on your mobile phone if you really wanted to

I would really not recommend trying to use Excel on a mobile phone. Even the biggest phone screen is far too small.

Thanks (0)
Replying to Paul D Utherone:
By iandc6
16th Aug 2013 12:29

Chatman you're completely right

HI Chatman, it was said slightly tongue in cheek, you're completely right.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By rampanesar
15th Aug 2013 11:52

Office 2013 and VT

I use both now and coming from Office 2003 it was a big change. 2 months on I am loving it and found I can do things better than 2003. It works perfectly with VT.

I don't agree with the ribbon comment above. I first found the ribbon annoying but realised I could have my own sub menu / ribbon with all the icons I need.

Not sure about 365 - I am uncomfortable with cloud stuff having just experienced Kashflow and Quickbooks on the cloud.

 

Thanks (0)
Replying to Wanderer:
avatar
By chatman
15th Aug 2013 14:14

Kashflow and QB Online

rampanesar wrote:
I am uncomfortable with cloud stuff having just experienced Kashflow and Quickbooks on the cloud.

What did you not like about Kashflow and QuickBooks online?

Thanks (0)
Replying to Wanderer:
avatar
By merlyn
15th Aug 2013 14:22

OPEX vs CAPX

rampanesar wrote:

 

Not sure about 365 - I am uncomfortable with cloud stuff having just experienced Kashflow and Quickbooks on the cloud.

 

Think thats the issue, most people think Office 365 is a cloud based application and whilst it does have cloud versions for you to use when not on your own PC it also comes with a full version of Office 2013 you can install locally and have all the same features as if you had bought Office 2013 retail.  You just pay for it on a OPEX and not CAPEX basis.

For smaller firms it's a much better model in my opinion as it means you don't end up with a big purchase cost in a few years when you need to upgrade all your staff to the latest version of Office.

Of course some of the Open Source solutions others have mentioned are really good and can read/write in office formats, the one which no one seems to have gotten right yet though is Powerpoint as things like Open Office don't seem to handle the slide layouts correctly, especially when using animations.

 

Thanks (1)
Replying to andy.partridge:
avatar
By Catherine123456
15th Aug 2013 19:30

I have a cunning plan!

merlyn wrote:

Think thats the issue, most people think Office 365 is a cloud based application and whilst it does have cloud versions for you to use when not on your own PC it also comes with a full version of Office 2013 you can install locally and have all the same features as if you had bought Office 2013 retail.  You just pay for it on a OPEX and not CAPEX basis.

Interestingly, I was told the exact same thing today - that the desktop element of Office 365 is exactly the same as Office 2013. So, I have decided to experiment by downloading a free trial of Office 365 (cloud and desktop) and a free trial of VT and see if I can get them to work together. If I can then I shall be a very happy bunny indeed.

I shall report my findings either way (just give me a while to get to grips with Windows 8!!!).

Thanks (0)
Replying to scalloway:
avatar
By merlyn
15th Aug 2013 20:34

good luck!

Catherine123456 wrote:

merlyn wrote:

Think thats the issue, most people think Office 365 is a cloud based application and whilst it does have cloud versions for you to use when not on your own PC it also comes with a full version of Office 2013 you can install locally and have all the same features as if you had bought Office 2013 retail.  You just pay for it on a OPEX and not CAPEX basis.

Interestingly, I was told the exact same thing today - that the desktop element of Office 365 is exactly the same as Office 2013. So, I have decided to experiment by downloading a free trial of Office 365 (cloud and desktop) and a free trial of VT and see if I can get them to work together. If I can then I shall be a very happy bunny indeed.

I shall report my findings either way (just give me a while to get to grips with Windows 8!!!).

You should find no difference between the office 365 local and 2013 versions. I do a lot of development using access and previously used the RTC version of 2013, since switching to 365 haven't found any difference at all.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By Mature Student
15th Aug 2013 14:43

It's a 1 user not 1 PC if you buy carefully!

Microsoft counts current activations.

The number of concurrent activations (and other rights) depends on the type of license you buy

OEM (factory installation) and PKC (Product Key Card) can be activated on only one machine.

FPP (Retail) licenses bought as online download or Boxed CD may be activated on 2 machines at the same time, your "primary" device and a portable device. Home and Student may be activated on up to 3 machines in your home at the same time.  As well, FPP installations may be transferred to new machines as required.

For all types of license, you can do some (unspecified amount of) upgrading of the computer, such as replacing the HD and still activate on the same machine.

As for a phone, unless it's a Galaxy Note or similar size, I would say it's too small a screen For a Note or android tablet, try Kingsoft Office. It's fully Office compatible. I currently use it on a Galaxy Tab 2 10.1.

 

Hope this helps.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By Catherine123456
15th Aug 2013 21:15

Hi Merlyn

My problem is that I want to run VT and their website states that whilst the software is compatible with desktop versions of Excel, they also say "Office 365 plans do not contain conventionally installed desktop Excel and hence are not suitable".

After reading your responses I thought it was worth testing it out. 

Thanks (0)
avatar
By merlyn
15th Aug 2013 23:39

desktop
They may be talking about the cloud version of 365, but please give it a go and post the results as i'm sure other users would love to hear how you get on.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By paulwakefield1
16th Aug 2013 08:34

That's the cloud version

I think MS have generated an awful lot of confusion by changing the offering when Office 2013 came out by still calling it Office365. There is no doubt the Office 365 local versions of Excel 2013 are fully featured and run VT very happily; it is very probable that the Cloud element of Office 365 will not run VT.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By gsgordon
16th Aug 2013 15:47

Office on mobile devices etc

Apart from size issues, mobile Office apps do not provide full functionality. The same is true of browser-based Office, including things like Excel Web App - which you can access in Skydrive.

I should say that the Excel Web App has much better functionality than any of the mobile Office apps I've tried. I imagine it has similar functionality to what you get with Office 365.

Microsoft is also adding functionality from time to time - I wish they would hurry up and complete the job as the Excel Web App is an excellent free way of distributing applications - for security reasons or because the users don't have desktop Office. You can share with anyone who has a Skydrive account - including a free account!

Thanks (0)
Share this content

Related posts