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PwC doing away with landlines

Is this the start of the 'mobile only' workplace?

PwC has announced that it's doing away with landlines at office desks, expecting its staff to use “more efficient” mobile phones instead.

Is this the beginning of the end for the dear old landline, or will this only fly in areas where they actually have mobile reception?

And how many telephone puns can I fit into a single article on this? Dial in later this week to find out...

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02nd Jul 2018 10:23

What about the extra BT cost to clients phoning in as mobile calls from a landline are more expensive than to another land line

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to bernard michael
02nd Jul 2018 10:40

Ah, but think of all the free minutes that PwC will have.

Suspect that inward calls may still be a landline number that is auto forwarded to the mobile?

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02nd Jul 2018 10:51

Not with their record for efficiency at business advice

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By Maslins
02nd Jul 2018 10:55

Presumably means all staff will have a separate "work" and "personal" mobile? Also I assume these mobiles will all be connected up via a clever internetty thing so PWC can transfer calls, track stuff etc.

I can see the benefits, only downside to me is means all staff basically have two mobiles to carry around most of the time.

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02nd Jul 2018 11:12

What's going to happen to confidential information ( if any) stored on the mobiles when the moped robbers come calling ?

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02nd Jul 2018 11:16

I'd have no qualms with this, so long as I can leave the mobile in my desk at night.

Technology can be great, but the cynic in me feels that the adoption of this technology is used as a tool to encroach on employees personal time, to make them available 24/7, under the guise of offering "flexible working arrangements".

I wonder, for example, what system they have in place to avoid an employee getting a phone call from a client at 11 o'clock at night. If it goes through to the employee, who doesn't answer it, could they be reprimanded for this?

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to Lone_Wolf
02nd Jul 2018 12:21

I think this would be my issue with it. Trouble with mobile phones is clients can contact you (and will) 24/7. Facebook messages are the ones that catch me out!

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to Lone_Wolf
02nd Jul 2018 17:29

Lone_Wolf wrote:

I'd have no qualms with this, so long as I can leave the mobile in my desk at night.

You wouldn't have your own desk with hot-desking; if you're lucky you will have a podium of drawers you can push to the desk that you're working at today.

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By SXGuy
02nd Jul 2018 11:31

Clearly never looked in to voip before then.

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By mrme89
02nd Jul 2018 12:31

I’ve recently joined an organisation (several thousand employees) that use mobile phones only.

I have an iPhone and decent spec laptop. We also hot desk – though we have our set departmental areas and we also have flexi time.

So far, so good and the flexibility works great for both the employee and employer.

Being called when off duty isn’t an issue at all – you just simply turn the device off.

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to mrme89
02nd Jul 2018 17:31

I think the issue with out of hours calls isn't so much whether you answer them or not, but one of client perception.

If a client has your mobile number, some of them will expect to be able to contact you at all sorts of weird and wonderful times and get a response. I've had it happen to me and I'm sure others have too. Having a landline number that auto-forwards client calls to your mobile reduces that somewhat, as clients won't expect an office DDI landline to be answered at 10:30 on a Saturday night.

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By mrme89
to gilderda
03rd Jul 2018 10:04

Appreciate that to a degree, but it can be easily managed.

For example, you can have a voicemail that the mobile is only used between office hours.

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02nd Jul 2018 14:25

I gave up my desktop phone some time ago because it was hardly used at all. I'm away from my desk a lot so people tended to call my mobile anyway since they had a better chance of getting answered that way.

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03rd Jul 2018 10:59

This will definitely stop one situation I'm sure all small pracitioner's have had where we are on the phone and client rings the other phone (mobile or landline) and leaves the message "I've just tried calling but you were engaged, so I've called this number and you haven't answered"

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