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Self Assessment secure unit (Ed. ?)

What do I need to know?

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One of my ltd directors has just announced that due to previous employment, he files tax returns to the high security team (his words, I know what he means but don't know their actual name). 
 

This is my first client who falls into this category and as far as I am aware, in practical terms it just means that we do a paper SA100 and a paper 64-8 ie nothing electronic. 
 

Am I right? What else should I be aware of? Do I use the normal addresses?

 Thanks 

Replies (21)

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RLI
By lionofludesch
10th Jun 2021 18:37

The time limit is January 31st, not October.

Other than that, no idea. I've never had one of those.

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By Leywood
10th Jun 2021 18:52

He is a so called celebrity? They have a specialist unit, cannot for the life of me recall what its called now and not at my office to check the papers for the ones I have. Sorry. But never do anything special for them, just filed online.

Or is he really really special?

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Replying to Leywood:
RLI
By lionofludesch
10th Jun 2021 19:24

If I remember right, you're unlikely to be in this group if you're a sports star or pop singer. More likely you'd be an MP, top civil servant, someone involved in the law or similar. There are no definite boundaries. It's all very fluid.

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Replying to lionofludesch:
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By Paul Crowley
10th Jun 2021 22:35

One worry of course is if a politically exposed person.

Extra AML procedures

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My photo
By Matrix
10th Jun 2021 19:32

If it is the same unit as a client of mine then we did everything online as usual and only found out when we wrote and someone from the special unit called. They wouldn’t give any background, it is all very secret.

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By Cloudcounter
10th Jun 2021 19:16

The taxpayer doesn't have to be a "celebrity" or "special." It could just be a question of working for a specific government department. I have a client who fell in to that category a few years back and they kept her on paper returns for a few years after she moved on. I think a few categories such as MPs and judges automatically go on to paper returns but some people in quite run of the mill roles can also be dragged in.

As said, the deadline is 31 January, even for a paper return

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Replying to Cloudcounter:
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By richard thomas
14th Jun 2021 13:58

Having been a very run of the mill judge I can tell you that I submitted electronic returns except when I had a reason to do a paper one.

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Replying to richard thomas:
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By More unearned luck
14th Jun 2021 16:15

Some of my barrister clients are also tribunal judges or recorders and they can and do submit electronic returns. Whereas my circuit judge client can only file on paper to PD1 even though he has now retired (although he continues to sit part-time). My long-retired high court judge client can and does file electronically.

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By Truthsayer
10th Jun 2021 20:08

I've got one client like this. Other than everything having to be done on paper, it is just like any other client.

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ALISK
By atleastisoundknowledgable...
10th Jun 2021 22:34

Thanks all.

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By mbee1
11th Jun 2021 09:02

We have a client like that. When asked his response was "I used to work in Hereford". I believe that's something to do with the SAS or some sort of special services. Yes everything is paper based but the deadline is 31 January.

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Replying to mbee1:
ALISK
By atleastisoundknowledgable...
11th Jun 2021 09:27

I don’t even have clearance to know what my client did for whom. It’s definitely more ‘defence of the realm’ than MP and definitely not a public figure.

I’d probably stop there before GCHQ report me and I get whisked away…

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By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
11th Jun 2021 09:12

its presumably "public department 1" which will be for any sensitive individuals. Normally be MOD or Home office related.

It has a separate team working for them, not lined to the normal SA system for security.

You wont be able to see the account online so you can only deal with it on the phone.
Good news the staff are really good and a cut above the average.

Do the normal 64-8, but you will have to paper file.

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Replying to ireallyshouldknowthisbut:
ALISK
By atleastisoundknowledgable...
11th Jun 2021 09:24

I knew ‘secure unit’ was the wrong name

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Replying to atleastisoundknowledgable...:
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By Michael Davies
11th Jun 2021 09:57

PD1 ? That takes me back.Use to be very common denominator in the seventies for Inland Revenue then.I think PD4 was Cardiff Office.Of course there was nothing sinister about it then.

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Replying to Michael Davies:
By SteveHa
11th Jun 2021 13:32

My own office used to be PD1. Of course, that's because I worked in the Revenue.

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By Mr_awol
11th Jun 2021 09:54

Not knowing which department, reason, etc i cant really say for sure, but whilst others have said everything is 'as normal' except for paper filing I'll add one slight additional difference i have come across:

You may find if you call the agent helpline etc then they will be unable to access the account and you will need to wait for someone 'suitably trained/authorised' to call you back, which can take a while. This was how we first found out that one of ours was dealt with by a different department.

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Replying to Mr_awol:
By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
11th Jun 2021 10:49

For PD1 its a separate number. The general helpline cant access the data - this is the whole point - the general system is not terribly secure, PD1 has their own separate systems with much higher security and fewer staff who can access it.

NO idea what happens with PD1 clients and MTD for income tax. I imagine HMRC have not thought about it either.

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Replying to ireallyshouldknowthisbut:
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By Hugo Fair
11th Jun 2021 13:49

Aaah, so PD1 is the part that actually complies with data security rules - whilst the rest of HMRC takes the water-retaining capabilities of a sieve as its role model?

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Replying to Hugo Fair:
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By Hugo Fair
11th Jun 2021 15:08

Mind you it all makes more sense than the 'official' security procedures.

Way back (1979 or 1980?) I had a stint of selling time-sharing services (access to super-fast computers on which to run intensive calculations) ... and one of my clients was **** who designed PWR nuclear facilities.
The key engineers were in a large room (known as the cage) in the centre of the building, with only one door for access and an armed guard outside it.
When I confidently strode towards the door I found myself looking at the wrong end of some serious firepower ... and was informed that I didn't have clearance to enter.
I reported this to my boss ('how can I sell if I can't talk to them?') ... and forgot about it.
Fast forward several months and I was back in the same premises (to talk to accountants not engineers), when I passed the same door and same guard - who casually asked "Don't you want to go in?"
To which I replied "Oh, have I have received clearance then?" ... resulting in the deadpan and gnomic "You're not cleared for that level of information ... but you can go in"!

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By North East Accountant
14th Jun 2021 11:19

I thought HMRC digital environment was super secure...... so why do they use paper for this secret unit?

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