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whats the difference between MySQL and SQL if any
Nicholas Myles

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By listerramjet
10th Nov 2006 12:47

at the risk of opening the floodgates!
SQL stands for structured query language - for a fuller description of this try http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SQL

MySQL is an open source database engine - look at http://www.mysql.com/.

OR - SQL is a language, and MySQL is an application. AND VBA is to Excel (sort of) as SQL is to MySQL.

Hope that helps?

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By Stewart Twynham
10th Nov 2006 13:02

Re: SQL
SQL (pronouced as either "S-Q-L" or "sequel") stands for "Structured Query Language" - this is the language used by most RDBMS's ("relational database management systems") or simply "databases" to Create, Retrieve, Update and Delete information.

Databases are absolutely critical to businesses - they usually hold accounting transactions, customer records, stock records - just about everything of value in a business, so choosing the right one is often an important event, although many business applications won't give you a choice - they'll just come with brand X.

There are several "X's" out there, and MySQL (often pronouced "my - sequel") is the name of one such product - which also happens to be an open source one. MySQL has been around for a while and is popular with many web developers that use the Linux / Unix operating systems, although MySQL also works on Windows as well.

Other popular choices include Microsoft's SQL Server ("sequel-server", but often written as MSSQL - which is obviously easy to confuse with MySQL) and Oracle.

Hope that helps!
Stewart Twynham
http://www.bawden-quinn.co.uk

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By carnmores
10th Nov 2006 16:56

none the wiser but considerably better informed!
i sort of understand but not fully guys

Sage are promoting MySQL and Digita MSSQL i think,, are these the same engines?

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By listerramjet
10th Nov 2006 18:48

acronyms!
MSSQL is probably the microsoft SQL database engine. Its sort of becoming a standard, but its licencing is expensive.

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By Anonymous
11th Nov 2006 07:55

Language .v. Database engine ...
SQL is the language (i.e. SELECT * from AnyFile WHERE Surname = 'Smith' ORDER By Surname). This is the command applied against the dabatbase to extract the information and will return a DataSet of all records with all fields where the Surname is 'Smith'.

Broadly speaking SQL is supposed to adhere to a set of Standards but in reality each Db supplier has their own flavour of the language - unfortunately as with most things IT is is generally Microsoft that 'bangs on' about universal standards and then promptly only adhers to their own, which change at their convenience

Whereas the database against which the above SQL command is run can be any of MySQL, Microsoft SQL Server (unhelpfully referred to as MSSQL), Oracle and even Microsoft Access (only some as an example).

MySQL is an OpenSource database (result of collaboration between members of the IT community) and is as near as makes no odds 'free'. On the other hand Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle etc. are proprietry and are quite expensive to run (except for MS SQL Server Express (free), but without some of the goodies - reporting)

To take matters further - when designing systems there are a number of layers (n-tier) that make up the application. For example these 'tiers' can be UI (user interface), Business Rules, Data Access layer (DAL) & finally Database; the 'tiers' talk to each other but have a definate role to fulfil.

It is possible to run some programs against different back end Db's by plugging in an alternative database, but bearing in mind the SQL language anomolies you need something like the Data Access Layer (DAL) to enure the whole thing works as it should

MySQL has with release 5 really become a force to be reckoned with in the Db market because of functionality, cost, small footprint and admin tools. In the future there will be quite a migration from the costly proprietry Db's to MySQL and this will be a real threat to the dominance of MS, Oracle in some sectors of the Db market

Sage & Digita are adopting different Db's. Sage is going for MySQL (OpenSource) and Digita is adopting Microsoft SQL Server. Whilst Sage have a free choice, Digita are pretty much tied into Microsoft and would be hard pressed to adopt MySQL in preference to Microsoft products. With this in mind Digita's choice is not entirely an independant unbiased one

Currently one advantage with Microsoft is that their Db contains all sorts of extra things - reporting, analysis (olap) etc and requires marginally less effort to put together systems.

However, overall my preference would be for MySQL even if slightly more effort is required

Sorry bit long

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By Richard Willis
13th Nov 2006 08:55

Very interesting.
There's always something to learn!

Any ideas as to whether MS ODBC links work with any/all of the SQL applications, or have MS stitched it up so that one has to have their product to link into Excel, Access, etc.?

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By listerramjet
13th Nov 2006 09:51

strange question?
microsoft products generally will link to any odbc compliant data source!

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By carnmores
13th Nov 2006 14:15

Aha
thanks, now i am wiser and considerably better informed

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