Anonymous
Share this content

Tax solicitors - how to become one

Didn't find your answer?

Hi,

Asking for friend, thats why anonymos. Thanks in advance to everybody who will answer.

How to become a tax solicotor and where to study this?

 

 

Replies (17)

Please login or register to join the discussion.

By Duggimon
23rd Feb 2021 10:54

Literally just google it.

https://lmgtfy.app/?q=Tax+solicitors+-+how+to+become+one

If that's too much reading, studying to become a solicitor is not for you.

Thanks (2)
RLI
By lionofludesch
23rd Feb 2021 11:28

I'm intrigued.

Why can't your friend ask for himself ?

Thanks (0)
Replying to lionofludesch:
Scooby
By gainsborough
23rd Feb 2021 11:32

The art of delegation. Friend will make an excellent solicitor.

Thanks (4)
Replying to gainsborough:
RLI
By lionofludesch
23rd Feb 2021 11:46

[chuckle]

Thanks (0)
Replying to lionofludesch:
avatar
By Tax Dragon
23rd Feb 2021 11:43

Plausible deniability. (Just in case it ever is proved that asking anonymously is against the rules.)

Thanks (1)
Replying to Tax Dragon:
RLI
By lionofludesch
23rd Feb 2021 11:45

Quote:

Plausible deniability. (Just in case it ever is proved that asking anonymously is against the rules.)

[chuckle]

Thanks (0)
avatar
By Truthsayer
23rd Feb 2021 11:53

Becoming any type of solicitor requires being able to spell. Study that first.

Thanks (1)
avatar
By AnnAccountant
23rd Feb 2021 12:22

Is Justin a "tax solicitor"? Maybe he can chip in.

Though I think your mate is selling himself short - tax barrister is the way to real riches!

Thanks (1)
avatar
By Justin Bryant
23rd Feb 2021 14:02

I agree with the above comments re bad spelling and also you could read this re writing skills generally: https://www.lawgazette.co.uk/commentary-and-opinion/mother-in-law-the-ar...

Thanks (2)
Replying to Justin Bryant:
avatar
By Paul Crowley
23rd Feb 2021 18:04

She is right.

Thanks (0)
Replying to Justin Bryant:
avatar
By Tax Dragon
24th Feb 2021 06:27

A good read, thank you.

Was it correct to write "Gran dropped the iron on the carpet"? Is "Gran, dropped the iron on the carpet" more solicitor-y? Does "GRAN dropped the iron on the carpet achieve ambiguity? Is ambiguity built into the first of these three? (And if so she's, slightly ironically given the thrust of her argument, deliberately using bad English in the written word. I love a slight irony, me.)

Or am I reading too much into it? Was it simply a straightforward lie? Which is the solicitor-y behaviour - deliberate use of bad English, or straightforward lying?

Thanks (0)
Replying to Tax Dragon:
By Duggimon
24th Feb 2021 08:24

The point was that it was a lie, but so transparent a lie that she was immediately caught out, and that itself became the joke which gave her mother a laugh, relieving the tension of the burned carpet before the author returned from school.

She had erred, knew she had done so and the note was a good stab at making light of the situation without realistically shifting the blame.

Thanks (0)
Replying to Duggimon:
avatar
By Tax Dragon
24th Feb 2021 08:55

Ah, but "Gran, dropped the iron on the carpet" would have been (an) honest (confession (to Gran)) - getting the same effect without lying, hence (I was suggesting - or wondering) more solicitor-y. (Assuming that Trump's legal team isn't typical of the profession.)

'Twas an idle muse. I confess I've never read Lynne Truss's "Eats Shoots & Leaves", but that doesn't mean I haven't been influenced by it.

Thanks (0)
Replying to Tax Dragon:
avatar
By Justin Bryant
24th Feb 2021 08:42

D'oh!

Thanks (0)
My photo
By Matrix
23rd Feb 2021 16:18

Don’t you have to be a lawyer first to become a tax lawyer?

I would imagine that having the skills to look stuff up and interpret it would be integral to this career.

Thanks (0)
Red Leader
By Red Leader
23rd Feb 2021 16:47

I concur.

Red Leader LJ

Thanks (0)
paddle steamer
By DJKL
24th Feb 2021 10:14

The OP (or their friend) ought to turn away from the legal Dark Side and come in to the accountancy Light.

Thanks (0)
Share this content