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What have you been reading?

What have you read or done this week to escape the world of tax and accounts?

Didn't find your answer?

Life as an accountant isn’t just tax and accounts. So when you’re not investigating the latest bit of cloud kit or dreading Monday’s Budget, what have you done this week to unwind?

Reading is mentioned in the title – because there is nothing better after a long working day to relax with a book – but this could be any form of entertainment, hobby or distraction.

I’ll go first. This week I’ve had my nose stuck in Adam Kay’s ‘This is going to hurt’ – the diary of a junior doctor. Kay’s diaries are packed with the kind of humour you’d expect from somebody who has hung up the stethoscope for life as a comedy writer.

We all complain about the long hours we work. Sometimes your working week may feel like a conveyor belt of work and sleep. But what struck me was the brutal hours Kay endured as a junior doctor.

Stuffed full of anecdotes of petty bureaucracy and objects ‘mysteriously’ lodged in orifices, the book is funny - very funny, actually. And I am sure some accountants may sympathise with the bureaucracy, long hours, and stomaching patients’ (or clients) demands (but maybe less so about the whole objects in orifices malarky).

Well, that’s been what’s distracted me from work this week. How about you? 

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RLI
By lionofludesch
26th Oct 2018 09:31

Dixon Hawke - the most famous fictional detective you've never heard of.

Literally thousands of short stories were written about this bloke - by several sub-contracted writers - and appeared in various newspapers and magazines.

After that, a book about the Dundonald Liberation Army is lined up.

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panda ketteringUK
By ketteringUK
26th Oct 2018 09:49

City & Guilds 2365 Diploma in Electrical Installations Level 3

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By killer33
26th Oct 2018 09:50

All Hell Let Loose by Max Hastings.

No, not an account of the Brexit Shenanigans, but of WW2. He's made an effort to include a lot of first hand accounts from regular soldiers and civilians which really bring home the horror of the situations so many faced.

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By Rammstein1
26th Oct 2018 14:34

He's done an equally good one about the war in the Far East in WWII.

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By Rammstein1
26th Oct 2018 14:59

He's done an equally good one about the war in the Far East in WWII.

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By ClaireB
26th Oct 2018 10:19

I listen to a lot of podcasts or audiobooks when I walk the dog - currently listening to Cabin Pressure and thankful that being in the middle of the Suffolk countryside no-one can hear me laughing out like an idiot.

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Jennifer Adams
By Jennifer Adams
26th Oct 2018 10:39

Automatic Kindle download of the Evening Standard every evening.
Worked in London for years and this was staple read ('diet' !) on the train journey home (when I got a seat)
Now I am based in Dorset I keep in touch with all that is happening in the 'smoke' this way.

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Lone Wolf
By Lone_Wolf
26th Oct 2018 10:54

I've recently gone back to the old fashioned paperback for my reading. I had converted to the Kindle, and the space savings and ease of transporting so much reading material was great - but I missed the feel of a real book, and coupled with the fact it meant staring at some form of screen all day, meant it was doomed to get chucked in a drawer.

In the last month or so I've read Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari - there's nothing ground breaking in it. Most of what he is saying we all probably know, but conveniently ignore in our day to day lives. Seeing it all laid out rather bluntly in front of you was interesting but also slightly uncomfortable. I'd recommend the read.

Also been reading Darien - Conn Iggulden's first steps into the fantasy genre, and Dunstan - another of Conn Iggulden's, although his more common historical fiction genre.

Currently on The Tombs - Clive Cussler. A story about treasure hunters on the search for Attila's burial tomb and the treasures it holds. Been decent so far.

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By mrshamilton
26th Oct 2018 10:57

I've read that book too, so funny and yet sad too!

Reading Origin by Dan Brown - chewing gum reading for late night

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By stephenkendrew
26th Oct 2018 11:02

My signed copy of "War of the Wolf" - the latest book from the master of historical fiction, Bernard Cornwell

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Lone Wolf
By Lone_Wolf
26th Oct 2018 12:28

I'm due to get back into that series. I got The Empty Throne for my birthday there so that's next on my hit list. I hadn't realised how many had been released after Pagan Lord.

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Replying to stephenkendrew:
Quack
By Constantly Confused
12th Jun 2019 12:15

stephenkendrew wrote:

My signed copy of "War of the Wolf" - the latest book from the master of historical fiction, Bernard Cornwell

Every time Bernard Cornwell releases a new book I realise all over again - I'm never going to find out what happens to Starbuck or Sharpe's kid am I :(

I should give it up and just read one of his other series.

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Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
26th Oct 2018 11:43

This week has been slow on the reading front as we were away last week in Sweden (Edinburgh schools October break here) returning on Monday , so a bit of catching up re work has reduced available time, however have started this week with short, before bed, reading sessions with:

Death of a Gossip -M C Beaton (Hamish Macbeth stories)- writing slightly stilted but I had read that was possibly the case with this first couple of books in the series until it gets into its stride so will persevere (the motto of Leith) as I have bought the first four books as an omnibus set.

Last week was a reading splurge as I sat outside on the decking in my shirtsleeves in very balmy weather for October and ploughed through :

With the Old Breed-E B Sledge- good book retelling author's experiences in WWII in the Pacific theatre with the U S Marines-enjoyed.

Fools & Mortals-Bernard Cornwell- okay, was not wholly happy with the plot but book grabbed attention and I picked up a couple of snippets about Shakespeare that I had not previously known.

Man of War and Waves of War-Graham Parry- WWII pot boilers akin to Douglas Reeman , I have the third in the series to read sometime; reading without having to think.

1/2 of The Dambusters-Paul Brickhill- a revisit to a book read in my teens, the writing style is certainly more clipped than I recalled. Given I know the story interest started waning after the raid on the Dams and it will likely sit part read on my kindle for a while.

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By SteLacca
26th Oct 2018 11:49

Not really unwinding, but had retinopathy screening yesterday, during which they put some eye drops of pure acid in my eyes (still stinging today), so no hope of continuing by current book last night.

Marc Oldman's "Poe Must Die".

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Flag of the Soviet Union
By thevaliant
26th Oct 2018 12:18

I don't read books much anymore. I like forums, and blogs, like this one.

Also http://www2.politicalbetting.com/ which is now well down the rabbit hole of Brexit

And https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/ for a bit of light fun arguing about the impact of US Lend-Lease on the Soviet Union performance during World War 2.

And finally, a little bit of writing. After all, the artificial intelligence of the United States won't improve itself in Hearts of Iron 2 - (I'm tweaking DAIM, which can be found here): https://forum.paradoxplaza.com/forum/index.php?threads/daim-for-doomsday...

Yes - I'm weird.

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By emmablyth
26th Oct 2018 12:24

I’m reading Haunting of Hill House because the Netlix show is really good.

Remember to buy your books from your local bookshop and independent bookseller instead of the tax dodgers!

I got mine from www.kingdombooks.co.uk

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By John Stone
26th Oct 2018 13:19

Just this morning I browsed a book on 'England's Lost Cricket Grounds' in Bakewell Library. My favourites were Bramall Lane, Sheffield - now housing a football cantilever stand and Hastings - now a shopping mall. Also lo0king forward to reading '50 Shades of Hay', about racehorse names over the years. The reviewer's favourite was 'Bad News' - because the owners thought it might travel fast. (Please be assured - my middle name is not Anorak).

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By Dib
26th Oct 2018 13:32

Bakewell library - is that still a portakabin type building as it was when I lived there donkey's years ago or is it a proper library now?

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By John Stone
26th Oct 2018 14:56

Bit like the lost cricket grounds I mentioned - the portacabin library at Bakewell and the car park on which it sat are long gone. That site is now a (quite smart) housing estate. Library is now a proper bricks and mortar building! By the way Dib - as you probably know - its puddings - not tarts.

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By Dib
26th Oct 2018 16:49

Aye, puddins

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By Michael C Feltham
26th Oct 2018 14:16

Currently, re-reading Bernard cornwall.

Mainstays are "Intelligent Fiction" such as Forsyth.

I very much appreciate the late Michael Crichton's books; Grisham and Michael Connolly.

I am also reading non-fiction books about Mengele and Auschwitz.

I am also a writer and have been for over 35 years.

Loads to do!

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By raju m
26th Oct 2018 14:30

I do brain puzzles like Dudoku, Kenken and Kakuru etc.

Raju M

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By John Stone
26th Oct 2018 14:58

Here's a brain puzzle for you Raju M. MTD for VAT. Why?

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By aishaparpia
26th Oct 2018 19:35

The girl with all the gifts - helps to escape this world sometimes lol!

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By Matrix
26th Oct 2018 19:45

If I spent less time on AWeb then maybe I would have time to read...

I read the Adam Kay book and realise the responsibilities we feel and take seriously are nothing compared to the medical profession.

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By Manchester_man
27th Oct 2018 13:03

Most of my books are by a fellow called Lexis Nexis. I haven't read a fictional book since the 'Five went to Smuggler's Top' I was a nippa!

I wish I did have an interest in fictional books; I realise I'm in a minority. I love a good non-fiction though, although most of my reading now consists of forum threads.

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Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
27th Oct 2018 13:34

What is life without literature, music and films?

I ought to add art to that list but am not sure I appreciate it beyond, "that's a pretty picture" although I do have a fair number of prints and also 2-3 originals hanging in the house. (They break up the boredom of emulsioned walls)

However I will accept that my books listed as recently read ( above) are unlikely to be remembered as great literature but every so often I do take a look at one of those lists of a hundred books that must be read and try another one.

However I have noticed that as I get older the willpower to persevere with some of them diminishes, as the part read "Cold Comfort Farm" and a few others on my kindle attest.

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By pedre
29th Oct 2018 13:26

The Tattooist of Auschwitz

Would highly recommend

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Replying to pedre:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
29th Oct 2018 14:53

Bought but not yet read.

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By Sue Murby
29th Oct 2018 14:28

Have just read The Mission Song by John Le Carre and At the Edge of the Orchard by Tracy Chevalier. Am now reading The Romanovs 1613 - 1918 by Simon Sebag Montefiore. According to my kindle it's a 20 hour read but I suspect it will take me a lot longer.

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Replying to Sue Murby:
Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
29th Oct 2018 15:14

If you have not yet read Simon Sebag Montefiore's Moscow trilogy I can certainly recommend "Sashenka" and "One Night in Winter", though have still to read the third one, "Red Sky at Noon".

Re Le Carre I am hard pressed to name a really duff book, Little Drummer Girl left me not that impressed, but pretty much everything else is excellent-I think I have now read the Karla trilogy about five times.

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By AlexTucker
29th Oct 2018 14:29

Today We Die a Little: The Rise and Fall of Emil Zátopek - amazing story!

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Quack
By Constantly Confused
12th Jun 2019 12:25

I'm reading (re-reading, but given the last read was 20 years ago and I was a teen who didn't understand half the jokes at the time) Good Omens (with perhaps a view to watch the series, maybe) and then onto the 4 books in the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy trilogy (another 'I read it as a teen but bet I missed most of the jokes').

I just finished A Scanner Darkly but struggled to enjoy it. I had a similar reaction to Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (but adore Blade Runner and the whole genre of AI and androids, especially Asimov) so maybe I just don't get on with Philip K (AW is going to censor this isn't it...) Dick.

But just to throw it out there, I find a good chunk of my free time is spent on a console or computer (as I am a believer in the idea that a good game can be as entertaining as a book and a film combined). I'm currently playing Nier Automata, Borderlands and Papers Please, all of which I am enjoying thoroughly.

I am currently stoked for the release of Cyberpunk 2077 next year and hoping to read a few books in the genre (starting with Neromancer) before then.

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Replying to Constantly Confused:
Stepurhan
By stepurhan
12th Jun 2019 13:23

Philip KD's novels can be a bit hard going sometimes.

You might want to try his short stories instead. He wrote a lot of them and the tighter format prevents him getting into the complicated rambling you get in the novels. A lot of interesting ideas too.

Once you've completed Borderlands, I would recommend playing the second one. Gameplay is largely similar, but the villain adds a dark sense of humour.

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Stepurhan
By stepurhan
12th Jun 2019 13:26

Having waited years to get copies of all three books at once from a library (not enough shelf space to buy such large books, with each part clocking in at 400 pages) I am reading the three part novel 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

I've enjoyed a lot of his shorter work, and this is no disappointment. I can't really describe it without giving away some of the surprises of the plot. If you haven't read any of his work before you might want to try the much shorter After Dark (which follows several characters through a night in Tokyo) to see if you like his style of writing.

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