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What is optimal dual monitor size?

Dual monitors

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Does anyone have a suggestion for optimal dual monitor size? I was at a clients during the week and we were reviewing workings at their desk on two very large dual monitors and I found it very disracting because rather than move my eyes I felt like I was at a tennis match moving my neck back and forward and being so close to the screen. 

I like the idea of having dual monitors because I can have software open on one and excel on the other. Any suggestions in terms of size?

Replies (26)

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By mrme89
23rd Aug 2019 11:28

I have 24" dual monitors. Works a treat.

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By Glenn Martin
23rd Aug 2019 11:55

I am sitting on twin 27 inch curved Samsungs, which are great, as i was starting to need reading glasses to use my laptop, but I don't now.

I think bigger than that and they start to take up too much room and you cannot see over the top of them.

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RedFive
By RedFive
23rd Aug 2019 12:06

We are on dual 23 inchers Glenn. My wife says bigger is not always better.

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Replying to RedFive:
By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
23rd Aug 2019 12:20

That's not what you wife says to me.

Although mine are only 2 inches bigger than yours.

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Replying to RedFive:
By Glenn Martin
23rd Aug 2019 13:24

Its the curve they like.

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By Tax Dragon
23rd Aug 2019 12:07

I'm happy with 21 inches.

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By Maslins
23rd Aug 2019 12:42

I dabbled with dual monitors a while back (can't remember precise size, but they were both 16:9 widescreen). Like you say, I found the head turning annoying. I imagine it works better with old fashioned 4:3 monitors, but these are fairly uncommon now.

Most of us in this office currently have just one, "superwide" monitor, where we normally use split screen. Problem with regular wide monitors is they typically only go up to normal full HD, which is 1920 x 1080. Problem with this is if you split screen it, each half is 960 wide. Most things seem to be optimised for 1024 or 1280, so this is annoying, regularly having to scroll left/right.

For me, superwide gets around this problem, with us typically using resolution of 2560 x 1080. Beauty of that is split it in half and they're 1280 wide each, which caters well to most software/websites. My current one is 29". May be bigger than most of those posting, but there's just one.

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A Putey FACA
By Arthur Putey
23rd Aug 2019 13:23

I have the new Google Accountant Glasses, which embed a monitor in each (varifocal) lens, so I can review accounts and spreadsheets while cycling. Works a treat, although I nearly fell off trying to file an MTD VAT return by eye movement.

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Replying to Arthur Putey:
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By PERMON
23rd Aug 2019 18:18

Nearly made a spectacle of yourself , then ? :-)

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By SteLacca
23rd Aug 2019 15:31

I have a 32" and a 27", at differing resolutions (QHD and HD respectively) with no issues.

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By Sheepy306
25th Aug 2019 11:04

I use 3 x 27inch Samsung monitors hooked up to my laptop on a corner-style desk, middle monitor is curved. I feel that bigger monitors in my setup would be too big and i’d have to move my head too much.

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Replying to Sheepy306:
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By Tax Dragon
25th Aug 2019 20:59

I've seen flight simulators with less screenspace!

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By atleastisoundknowledgable...
25th Aug 2019 14:41

We all have 2 x Ilyama Prolite Height Adjustable 22” monitors. At about £115+VAT, they were the cheapest height adjustable ones I could find at that size. In my home study, I have a much smaller desk, so have 1 x LG 29” ultra wide monitor, 21:9. I use split screen to half it, works really well (although I prefer the dual screen setup I have at work).

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By pauljohnston
29th Aug 2019 10:53

We use 22" widescreen from lyama Prolite

Dont go for cheap get good screens with at least 1920 x 1080 pixels. Also if your machine does not have it you will need a dual screen display card.

Windows 10 allows you to split the view on one screen so if you prefer you could get a single much larger screen and split it.

Lastly dont forget that you will have to lift the screens off the desk to eye height or may get back and other problems

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Replying to pauljohnston:
A Putey FACA
By Arthur Putey
29th Aug 2019 12:59

pauljohnston wrote:

Lastly dont forget that you will have to lift the screens off the desk to eye height or may get back and other problems


... unless you have varifocal glasses in which case raising the screens will make them harder to read unless you also raise your seat, or your head, leading to neck problems, which is why I liked my previous setup of a laptop with a monitor plugged in
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Replying to pauljohnston:
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By JoF
02nd Sep 2019 11:00

Another shout out for LLyama Prolite. I have two of the 24" screens. Hate it when working on anything smaller or worse, just one.

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By Rgab1947
29th Aug 2019 10:58

2 x 27" BenQ with night blue light.

Would have 3 but with my 13" laptop the desk is not big enough.

Go for best resolution though.

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By Slg
29th Aug 2019 11:00

I use 3 x 32" Cello gaming monitors in the office and 3 of the 24" Cello monitors in the home office. 32s are great but as someone else has mentioned, you do turn your head to view different screens.
The 24s are ideal though and take up a bit less space plus cost about £65 less per monitor than the 32" - was around £108 for the 24s.

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By paulwakefield1
29th Aug 2019 11:31

2x 24" monitors for work and a 19" slightly off to one side on which Outlook resides.

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By [email protected]
29th Aug 2019 13:01

I have an Acer 22" 16:9 and a Benq ?? but same hight 4:3
both are set to 1080 high. works a treat without taking up too much desk space.
The big one is right in front and the small one to one side
With 2x 22" I've found = a bit too much head turning.

I've also found that a 22" with a laptop, using the laptop as 2nd screen (seperate keyboard) works well too.

If you can (Not so easy with the laptop) set them up so that they are level with each other. not a problem if you buy 2 the same, but can be if you're adding to an existing setup

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By richard.snape
30th Aug 2019 07:42

Having 16:10 1920 x 1200 monitors makes a big difference over more common 16:9. The extra height makes it more viable to look at the whole page of an A4 document without scrolling. They generally cost a little more but well worth it.

2 x 24" is good.

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By SouthCoastAcc
30th Aug 2019 09:16

2x 24 inch screens here

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By PERMON
30th Aug 2019 11:48

I'm beginning to feel left out here. I'm only using one monitor (22").

Can somebody tell me if two display connections are required on the PC or can the monitors be doubled up using an adapter ?

Does having two or more applications open at teh same time not bog down performance ?

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Replying to PERMON:
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By richard.snape
02nd Sep 2019 10:32

Pcs will require two display connectors except for displayport which supports multiple monitors via daisy chaining or a displayport hub.

Macs offer daisy chaining via thunderbolt but you need expensive displays with thunderbolt loopthrough.

On a pc you may have vga and hdmi connectors which can usually both be used together. If not you would need to fit a PCIe display adaptor which is possible in all but the most compact cases. Basic ones costing about £30 will be more than adequate for office (non gaming) work.

Any reasonably modern PC will be able to cope with multiple office applications running at the same time. Even with one display, I doubt you close each application before using another, so no different really unless you have video playing on one screen while working on another.

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By waltere
03rd Sep 2019 09:39

Should've gone to Specsavers (or any other optician).

No matter what screen size you opt for, please look after your eyes - you only get one pair! Sooner or later, everyone needs glasses to make sense of things held close to them. Wearing my standard varifocals, I still found it difficult to read my screen and ended up either taking them off and leaning forward or tilting my head down and peering over the top like some nutty professor! Both manoeuvres are hard on the neck. The solution turned out to be a pair of "VDU glasses", optimised for the distance at which I normally view a VDU. Only downside is that I often keep one pair pushed up on my head while I wear the other, making me look like... well, a nutty professor!

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Replying to waltere:
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By PERMON
03rd Sep 2019 10:41

Well said.

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