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istock_Asda-petrol-station_Keith Lock

Petrol crisis: Could proactive planning have lessened the impact?

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A shortage of truck drivers, blamed on Brexit and coronavirus restrictions, has triggered long queues at petrol stations and fuel shortages in many areas of the UK. Combined with soaring gas prices, the failure of some smaller energy suppliers, and empty shelves at supermarkets, Britain’s crumbling supply chains are causing panic amongst businesses and consumers.

29th Sep 2021
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What started with KFC unable to source chickens has led to the prospect of Christmas without turkeys. The truck driver shortage that led to empty shelves and shortened menus earlier in the year has caused thousands of petrol stations across the UK to run dry as stations cannot get enough fuel to supply panicked motorists.

The government has said it will introduce emergency measures, including issuing temporary work visas for 5,000 foreign truck drivers and the suspension of competition law to allow suppliers to deliver fuel to rival operators as way of calming the public.

While motorists look further afield to fill up their vehicles, the government also this week called up army drivers to help operate tankers in a bid to avert further crisis, while the RAC reported a sharp increase in the number of stranded drivers who had run out of fuel.

Back in July, the Road Hauliers Association (RHA) warned Brexit-related paperwork, tax complications and visa restrictions had led to a significant drop in cross-border drivers, and that around 100,000 long-haul operators had left the industry. The lobby group has since been on a collision course with the government, with both accusing the other of whipping up fear for political ends. 

Paging Michael Fish…

There is no fuel shortage, ministers have repeatedly expressed, however, only a depletion of common sense amongst a spooked population, reminiscent of the Great Toilet Roll Grab of 2020

With Britain so reliant on road haulage; 98% of all food and agricultural products and 98% of all consumer products and machinery are transported by road freight, any disruption to that network was likely to cause severe supply chain problems. Industry forecasters, and many within the AccountingWEB community, saw it coming.

“A lot of the problems now being seen have stemmed from not valuing what is actually a critical part of a good economy enough, logistics,” said Rick Smith, managing director at business rescue firm Forbes Burton. “There have been many years of neglect towards the haulage industry, not just by government but by the general populace as well and now the potential lack of turkeys is coming home to roost.”

Smith, as many AccountingWEB commentators believe, said tabloid media headlines had inflamed the situation and made an already volatile issue much worse. 

“The best the planners can do is anticipate worst case scenarios, such as bin lorries not being able to get fuel and collect rubbish, and work from there,” Smith added. “The key is, plan for different scenarios and be ready to shift trajectory at a moment's notice should something unexpected happen.”

Companies themselves must take their share of the blame, accounting experts believe. “I would expect organised clients to be in a position to sort this out,” said AccountingWEB commentator Paul Crawley. “If a client has drivers, then I would expect them to be more aware than most of us. This was so avoidable. There have been so many drivers complaining about conditions for so long.”

Long time coming

Some of the issues now flaring up have been decades, rather than months, in the making, added Nick Jackson, finance transformation leader at Oracle. “Lean, just-in-time supply chains have struggled in the face of global crisis,” he said. “To get back on track and plan ahead, spending big to ensure supply chains are robust and resilient, not overly lean, is critical.”

This means making the supply chain more agile and able to adapt quickly to any disruption, he said.  

“Finance directors must work closely with supply chain managers to identify and prioritise changes that matter most,” Jackson told AccountingWEB. “This requires increased visibility across operations, not just in terms of product whereabouts, but into the partners and stakeholders that supply chains rely on.” 

Increased transparency and awareness of the most business-critical elements are the main goals here, he said. Using automation and other efficiency-improving technologies could also help finance directors gather more information, analyse the supply chain, make predictions and act on insights, he said.

“Investment in this area is key to shoring up the supply chain and mitigating exposure to the ongoing disruption we’re seeing,” said Jackson.

The future of forecasting

Regardless of the current situation, it is becoming harder for finance teams to budget with any level of confidence about how the future may unfold and impact their businesses, added Jonathan Kipps, Chartered Accountant and founder of budgeting specialist software Forecast5. 

He said some of the problems business are juggling cannot be resolved with Excel, which is better for cashflow and profit and loss, but not responsive enough to the constantly fluctuating demands of the present. 

“How is a significant hike in the gas price going to affect input costs? What will be the effect of a fuel shortage be on deliveries and sales? And how will this translate through to the bottom line – and the balance sheet? What will be the knock-on effect on our business if energy load-sharing is introduced? Will my banking covenants be at risk? What new capital will need to be found to shore up the business?” Kipps said. “These are hugely important issues – and unfortunately possibly existential for some; solutions have to be found and time is – and will be – of the essence.”

The difficulties of scenario planning at group and corporate level are likely to increase over time, Kipps said, as even when the present situation blows over, the UK is committed to reducing its carbon levels which may further impact energy supply chains.

“Transitioning to carbon-free without taking great care to protect and ensure this reliability will inevitably lead to continuing (large) cost increases and disrupted supply lines,” he said. 

“It falls to the corporate finance managers to try to prepare the directorate and management to ‘best guess’ how to cope and they need the finest tools available.”

Benchmarking

“It is going to take a while to rebalance and there are known knock-on effects that need dealing with,” said Forbes Burton’s Smith. “Fluctuation and volatility will be likely for the foreseeable future, but it is likely that the second quarter of 2022 will give a bench mark as to how the year is going to pan out.”

All businesses are likely to be impacted one way or another so it's best to be prepared, he told AccountingWEB. “The best way to look at it is to review what happened in the past, what is happening now and what is likely to be on the way.” with that picture in place, firms will be able to better foresee the future, he said.  

“You're best using strategic forecasting and taking a holistic view, forming an opinion on what is going to happen and ensuring you have factored in implementation,” said Smith.

Replies (103)

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By Justin Bryant
29th Sep 2021 16:30

I read that IDS said this is all totally unconnected with Brexit. If you believe that, you'll believe anything (like that £350m on the side of that bus).

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Replying to Justin Bryant:
By mydoghasfleas
30th Sep 2021 11:06

I saw the article as well. He blamed it on bureaucracy, cancellation of driving tests and mocked that motorcycle tests were also cancelled although there is no social distancing involved in that test. Of course what, he failed to accept is it is the politicians that are meant to oversee all aspects of government including the bureaucracy, which makes it his thought.

I am not sure Brexit is responsible but I am sure it is contributory as the driver shortages in Europe are proportionately less. Thinking of driver shortages, Jimmy Carr claimed, "Dwarf, shortage" as his shortest joke. I think he meant in words not stature.

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Replying to Justin Bryant:
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By mhkay
30th Sep 2021 11:16

Yes, the £350m figure was wrong. Spending on the health service has actually gone up by £420m a week since 2016 (in real terms, not counting one-off Covid spend).

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Replying to mhkay:
By Duggimon
30th Sep 2021 12:30

Has it really? Super. Once you factor in the inflationary rise, how much has it gone up then?

It's a rhetorical question, I know the answer and it's less than half what you said.

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Replying to mhkay:
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By Justin Bryant
30th Sep 2021 12:37

I also read recently that even the bloke who came up with that £350m strapline admitted it was an invented fictional figure. DC also admitted it was anyone's guess as to how Brexit would pan out and that he in particular had no clue about that.

Also, in any event you are comparing apples & pears.

If you did the full correct financial analysis on an apple vs apple basis there is no such Brexit dividend at all. Quite the opposite.

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Replying to Justin Bryant:
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By Justin Bryant
02nd Oct 2021 13:17

You need only look at this graph to see that what he said is utter nonsense, as Brexit is the joint leading factor (or at least a factor): https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/58772169

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By Justin Bryant
30th Sep 2021 09:44

Looking at the gas tank half full, at least no-one has any fuel to add to this fire.

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By Duggimon
30th Sep 2021 10:58

The fuel shortage isn't a shortage, it's just the public overreacting to the leak we fed them to make them overreact.

The pandemic is being managed effectively, it's just the public not obeying the rules that are causing the problems.

Brexit isn't leading to any shortages, it's the public panic buying things who are the problem.

[X thing the government is doing/failing to do] isn't a problem, the public are the problem and the government is always right. All the issues are caused by not following the rules and doing what you're told. It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.

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Replying to Duggimon:
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By Justin Bryant
30th Sep 2021 11:03

Yes; but the politicians aren't the stupid ones here. They're smart enough to know that to retain their power there are more than enough stupid people around to believe their lies.

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By mydoghasfleas
30th Sep 2021 11:11

Golden rule of investing, "Know who is the bigger fool in the Market. If you do not know who the bigger fool is, it's probably you." Seems it applies to politicians too.

It's so worrying that we do not get the government we vote for but we get the government we deserve. At that point, I look around and think, "we really made a mistake descending from the trees."

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Replying to mydoghasfleas:
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By Agutter Accounts
02nd Oct 2021 13:25

According to the Daily Star front page this morning, the circus is short of clowns. So it has voluteered the current government as worthy replacements.

Enter Bozo teh Clown aka Boris Johnson as the Star calls him.

No wander we lurch from crisis to crisis with a government the objection of such derision.

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By Paul Crowley
30th Sep 2021 11:11

So now transport of fuel is being even further outsourced
To the Army
Transporting fuel is the top end of LGV (HGV) driving
It is the most skilled. Fuel is a sloppy liquid that makes braking and turning a bit more of a challenge.
Brexit may have lost a few drivers, but if the petrol companies were relying on imported labour for the most skilled truck driving role, then a bit of planning would have helped.

That means better pay and conditions for the drivers

I gave up my LGV licence 25 years ago, but there are lots of LGV licences held by former drivers who chose to get a job with better pay and conditions

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Replying to Paul Crowley:
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By vstrad
30th Sep 2021 11:59

The military has a great deal of expertise in moving large quantities of petroleum products. In fact, there are whole organisations devoted to just that. Or do you think the infantry still go everywhere on foot?

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Replying to vstrad:
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By Paul Crowley
30th Sep 2021 18:56

I was a soldier once and young.
Royal Corps of Transport as was, RLC now
I even trained on refuellers (Bowser), but that vehicle was for refuelling out in the Ulu, not transfering to stationary petrol stations. First thing is to set a spike in the ground to Earth the vehicle.

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By richards1
30th Sep 2021 11:08

I would agree with others it is primarily UK population not following rules and the "I'm all right Jack pull up the ladder" attitude that has caused this. I have just returned from France and also read French newspapers etc.
Right now the French population is still sticking to the rules wearing masks in public places, super markets and Restaurants. You cannot move without showing your Covid pass (the UK one works fine).
Contrast that with the attitude in the UK. That attitude has always been there in recent times and is nothing to do with Brexit.
Turning to supply chain issues and shortages. France has some of the same worries and issues (there is a current fight about the cost of loo rolls going up). This is a global problem and I defy any of you to grab the controls during the pandemic and have done a much better job.
What happened to the war time adage "keep calm and carry on"?

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Replying to richards1:
By mydoghasfleas
30th Sep 2021 11:19

In 2016 Operation Cygnus indicated how ill prepared we were for a pandemic. Instead of doing anything the results were parked and hushed up. Eventually it was forced into release last year.

One of the noticeable findings was insufficiency of ventilators.

Whilst I agree it would have been difficult to grab the controls and do a better job. Those already at the controls should have done better because they had been warned.

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Replying to mydoghasfleas:
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By mhkay
30th Sep 2021 11:45

One of the conclusions of the 2016 Cygnus exercise was that in the event of a pandemic, old people should be moved out of hospitals and into care homes for their own safety. That became policy, and was implemented in 2020, and caused thousands of deaths as we now know. Being prepared and making plans is all very well, but plans don't always stand up to contact with a real enemy.

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Replying to mydoghasfleas:
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By mhkay
30th Sep 2021 11:51

And there's another very difficult question here: should the authorities suppress information, if they think that publishing the information will make matters worse? What we've seen in the pandemic, and again in the panic buying, is people over-reacting to correct information. How do you prevent that over-reaction? Does it ever make sense to be less open with the facts, to prevent panic?

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By johnjenkins
30th Sep 2021 12:07

Now you know why we haven't been told that the aliens are here.

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By ColA
30th Sep 2021 11:20

Back in 2016 as Group Accountant/Company Secretary to a £35m family group that imported goods from the Continent and exported a modest amount too I argued that cutting the U.K. out of the single Market was economic suicide. They even employed EU staff in specialised areas. To a man they were resolute in swallowing the perennial Brexit bunkum from the Mail and Telegraph.
I fear typical of too many, naive old-school business leaders who are now bleating about labour shortages and supply-chain issues.

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By johnjenkins
30th Sep 2021 11:20

The fuel shortage at the pumps is due to panic buying. The panic buying is due to a whistle blower selling a story to the media after a meeting with the Government to discuss the HGV driver shortage etc. So it's not brexit (There is a shortage of HGV drivers all over Europe). I personally feel that the Government have done a tremendous job in getting us where we are today, coming out of the pandemic. Of course things aren't back to normal, they won't be for a year or two. So stop knocking our Government (who got in with a big majority) and start blaming the real culprits.

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Replying to johnjenkins:
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By Justin Bryant
30th Sep 2021 12:05

But you can't have thing both ways by saying it's all totally unconnected with Brexit and yet introduce an emergency visa system in an attempt to fix the shortage of drivers that would not be needed in the absence of Brexit.

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Replying to Justin Bryant:
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By johnjenkins
30th Sep 2021 12:14

We have come out of the EU and straight into a pandemic. Give this Government a few years without too many world wide problems and you'll see things beginning to shape up, unlike the EU, which is on a downward spiral. If we were still in the EU we wouldn't have the vaccine so we would still be in lockdown and guess what, no panic buying.

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Replying to johnjenkins:
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By Justin Bryant
30th Sep 2021 12:24

But that's all totally beside my point (which was solely re IDS's Brexit comments).

You'd make a good politician I think!

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Replying to johnjenkins:
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By ollie
01st Oct 2021 16:04

"If we were still in the EU we wouldn't have the vaccine so we should still be in lockdown"

Utter nonsense. The EU might have been slower out of the blocks than the UK but vaccination rates are now higher in 8 EU countries than in the UK.

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Replying to ollie:
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By johnjenkins
04th Oct 2021 09:23

My answer was an exaggerated reply to Justin. Try to keep up.

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Replying to Justin Bryant:
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By Rgab1947
30th Sep 2021 12:21

The emergency visa is a sop.

5,000 with a 100,000 drivers shortage. Industry asked for 10,000.

3 months visa when it takes a month to get it with paperwork galore. And who gives up a job in the EU where there are lots of driver shortages as well to work in UK for 3 months where the conditions are worse than in the EU (And its not good there either hence their driver shortages).

Its a sop for politicians to say "see we listened and gave you visas". Smoke and mirrors its all.

As one commentator on this thread said the aliens are amongst us.

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Replying to Rgab1947:
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By Justin Bryant
30th Sep 2021 13:07

Again, that's all totally beside my IDS point and simply confirms my other above point about how politicians can get away with brazenly lying so easily.

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By mhkay
30th Sep 2021 11:25

I think the article gets close to the root cause of the issue, which is that the systems we rely on to get stuff to where it's needed have been fine-tuned for performance and cost and don't have enough resilience to cope with unexpected events. The panic-buying phenomenon (not limited to consumers, we saw the same thing with the PPE crisis last year) means that a perceived threat to supplies, or a minor disruption, rapidly escalates into a major problem. It's a chaotic system (the butterfly effect) and that makes it very hard to plan for. Of course Brexit is part of the story: if the system doesn't have resilience built in, then by definition it can't cope with significant changes, and whether Brexit is a good or bad thing in the long term, there's no denying that it's disruptive.

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Replying to mhkay:
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By johnjenkins
30th Sep 2021 11:34

You are right in one aspect. If we didn't have Brexit we would still be in lockdown, because we wouldn't have the vaccine, so less vehicles on the road and no panic buying.

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By taxinfo
30th Sep 2021 11:32

Thanks to brexsh*t we have a shortage of HGV drivers to cart food and general goods round to shops = food (etc) shortages.

Somehow this has blossomed into an alleged driver shortage for petrol tankers so idiots pile into fuel stations to fill up when they don't really need to.

We've been short of general HGV drivers since brexsh*t, of course, but NOT petrol tanker drivers.

Since brexsh*it have we had trouble getting petrol? No.

We still have the same number of ADR qualified drivers we always had since brexit.

So why have we suddenly got trouble now? Because the media hyped it up.

Makes you think.

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By mhkay
30th Sep 2021 11:39

Looking at the actual question (Could pro-active planning have helped?), I think it's relevant to look at the resilience of systems where there is top-down planning vs. systems that are organic, with no central direction and control. Our health service is in the former category, our logistics industry is very much in the second. Both approaches have strengths and weaknesses in terms of their ability to adapt to change, but I think there are case studies that show that organic systems are more prone to collapse if the level of disruption caused by external changes exceeds some threshold.

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By winton50
30th Sep 2021 12:03

The shortages we are seeing at the pumps is entirely down to panic buying but you have to ask yourselves why are the public doing this?

The UK government are reaping what they have sown in that they have taken a gleeful delight in lying again and again knowing that nothing could be done about it.

Then they are surprised when Boris goes on TV and says there isn't a fuel shortage and no one believes him!

You have to look at their behaviour over a number of issues and see the way that they say one thing and then do another. Viz the fuel shortage when they said that the army wouldn't be called in two days ago and today....

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Replying to winton50:
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By johnjenkins
30th Sep 2021 12:26

There isn't a fuel shortage. The fuel shortage at the pumps is caused by, firstly panic buyers and then as the queues get longer, added panic buying. So the Government tried to allay peoples' fears and when that didn't work they did something about it. If people did normal buying there wouldn't be as many shortages in anything. It's human nature and nothing to do with what the Government say. How many people in the world believe what any Government say?

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Replying to johnjenkins:
By Duggimon
30th Sep 2021 12:34

The shortage is caused by reduced deliveries and made worse by panic buying, it's not caused by panic buying.

The government is also responsible for the panic, the person they blamed for leaking it wasn't in the meeting it was said to be leaked from.

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Replying to Duggimon:
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By johnjenkins
30th Sep 2021 14:06

No the shortage at the pumps is caused by panic buying. If people had stuck to normal buying then the pumps wouldn't have run out. Had the problem been reduced deliveries then we would have had a shortage at the pumps ages ago. It's not rocket science.

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Replying to johnjenkins:
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By Agutter Accounts
30th Sep 2021 14:15

Now you have stated the obvious. Panic buying has created a shortage. Tell us something we did not already know.

But who or what started the "panic"? To adapt a well-known phrase from WW2 "careless talk causes shortages". And then the more that those in authority try to claim the re is no crisis, the worse it gets.

A behavioural psychologist would be able to explain and also what might be done to change behaviour. But then we've had enough of "experts" so I hear.

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Replying to Agutter Accounts:
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By johnjenkins
30th Sep 2021 14:18

See my post below.

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Replying to johnjenkins:
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By Agutter Accounts
30th Sep 2021 12:36

Well, granted there is plenty of supply but it is in the wrong place. It cannot get to the pumps quick enough.

Davey also said that the problem of panic in 2012 was exacerbated greatly by one minister, Francis Maude, letting his gob go in public thus giving the impression there WAS a problem when there wasn't.

So this crisis also is caused by certain people in authority saying or implying there was/is a problem. The media have picked this up, and hey presto, everyone flocks to the nearest service station.

There are ministers in this government from the top down who like to pontificate and bluster and that is what has happened in this case. And so the more they say there is not a problem the more people tend to think there is.

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Replying to Agutter Accounts:
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By johnjenkins
30th Sep 2021 14:16

You're quite right. Fuel cannot get to the pumps quick enough to service panic buying.
BP had a supply concern and this was taken to the media by the RHA.
Unfortunately there are people and bodies out there that still think they can make us get back in the EU and will do anything to try and bring down this Government, especially Boris, who, by the way, got in with a vast majority. We have been hand held by the EU for too many years, and thankfully we have a Government that is flexible and adaptable to take us into the future. This Government portrays the British people and our pro-active approach. Of course, nothing is perfect.

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Replying to johnjenkins:
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By Agutter Accounts
30th Sep 2021 14:38

The "vast majority" you talk about was gained on only 44% of the popular vote by what is essentially an unrepresentative electoral system that awarded it 56% of the seats.

In truth I found BOTH major party offerings in 2019 uninviting and frankly deluded. One leader was shallow and capable only of banal 3 word slogans and required the loyalty of sycophants to maintain his leadership. The other was a serial rebel, had no leadership qualities at all, and had policy platforms appropriate to the 1970s. I voted for neither.

Certain sections of mainly English opinion never understood what the EU was about, and had neither the attention span now the erudition to find out more. Brexit was based on pig-headed Little Englanderism, people who think rules they do not like should not apply to them, and a complete lack of understanding of international relations and the mechanics of international trade.

Returning to the EU any time soon is not on the agenda. Other European governments and their peoples if you read their Press, think Britain has lost its marbles - probably correct in respect of the corridors of power, and any application would be treated with derision.

People like Bunter and people who support him have ruined the country, not only with Brexit but lack of seriousness, the inability to plan long term, and who want a free-market Nirvana that benefits only the wealthy minority who bankroll them.

I hold out little hope for many people here going forward. While the rich get richer, the poor take the blame. In Britain, was it ever thus especially since Thatcher.

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Replying to Agutter Accounts:
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By johnjenkins
30th Sep 2021 14:54

oooooooooooooooooooo another one who thinks that people who voted for Brexit didn't know what they were voting for. Incorrect. It was a lot of people who voted to stay in didn't know what it was about and thought oh well let's just stay in.
Who really wants a country called Europe under one Parliament? If we had a vote in Europe about wanting one Parliament, what do you think the voters would say? a resounding non. The EU is a defunct organisation that has passed its sell by date and over the next few years will totally collapse after which Britain will come up with a flexible and common sense agreement that all European countries will sign up to.
We've always had first passed the post (rightly or wrongly) so stop whining.
The rich will always get richer and the poor poorer - look around the world, it's human nature.
Now get yourself some fish and chips, sit on the beach and chill.

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Replying to johnjenkins:
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By Agutter Accounts
30th Sep 2021 15:17

Now you are putting words in my mouth I never said. For the record, I take the Attlee and coincidently Thatcher view of the referendum as the tool of demagogues and dictators.

As it happen the so-called "debates" in 2016 were shallow, fact-lite and mainly conducted by middle-aged Tory men, not my favourite people which ever side of the issue they represented. And Farage is just a rabble-rouser, arguably racist, and in it for the living it made him and the notoriety. There were much better debates in the 60s and 70s on the subject on both sides.

Frankly, the narrow margin for "Leave" - 51% is hardly decisive, and two nations out of 4 voting clearly Remain. No wonder the country was, and still is split badly.

You are clearly one of the people I described earlier who did not study the actual working of the EU and what it is all about and how decisions are actually made. There are certain sections of mainly English opinion, who if they do not get all their own, throw a tantrum and take their bat and ball home.

My own view is that the decision is what it is and what has happened so far is what I would have expected. I suspect in the end, quite a few Leave voters will get something rather different than what they were led to believe.

I had no illusions about what Brexit meant and did not vote for it. That does not mean to say I supported Cameron and Osborne whom regularly disagreed with on a lot of things.

I am not whining about FPTP. I am making justified criticisms shared by a lot of people. It is unrepresentative and therefore not very democratic. And I think anyone who accepts poverty as a fact of life is heartless.

I am not near a beach and it's raining and the chips at our local shop are not up to scratch - and bad for you anyway with all that batter.

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Replying to Agutter Accounts:
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By johnjenkins
30th Sep 2021 15:56

The workings of the EU is geared towards a federal Europe which, I believe, the majority of Europeans do not want. EFTA was a far better option (with a few tweeks).
The only thing we were led to believe in was getting control back, the rest was all hype on both sides. Talking of Nigel, he actually said it all, "if we weren't in the EU, would we join". The EU wasn't what we signed up for in the first place but unfortunately the momentum of federalism brings us to where we are today.
I was going to say that I think you need to get out more (hence the fish and chip phrase) but it would appear that you are a fine weather person who owns the bat and ball and only hires them to the right people.

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By Agutter Accounts
30th Sep 2021 16:22

What moves to federalism? Only Emmanuel Macron ever talks about "more Europe". The Germans live in a federation so they already have it. Personally, it never bothered me one way or the other. One set of politicians is very much the same as any other set of politicians in my book - scoundrels unless proved otherwise. The only difference with European ones is they are foreign, not a sin in my book. But then I have some knowledge of foreign languages and have lived abroad.

I see btw Farage got bumped while queueing for petrol. Happens to the best lol.

I get out every day with our two dogs, rain, shine or snow.

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Replying to johnjenkins:
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By Agutter Accounts
30th Sep 2021 20:53

Actually they are whippets, this being the north east, and have perfectly normal English names.

Germans always have coalitions and make them work because they are a sensible, grounded people. The English think they know it all but are basically regarded as aarrogant, take the pet if they do not get their own way, and are bad in organising their own affairs.

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Replying to johnjenkins:
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By Agutter Accounts
01st Oct 2021 09:30

What is "the English way of life"? It means different things to different people. I have lived in many different places including abroad and have adapted.

I'm not a Tory, and I am not what currently is termed a "patriot". I am what Theresa May called "a citizen of nowhere".

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Replying to Agutter Accounts:
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By johnjenkins
01st Oct 2021 09:43

"The English way of life" means freedom (able to do or say what you like within the law), humour (taking the mickey out of everyone and everything), one of the best healthcare systems in the world, one of the best judicial systems in the world, one of the best, if not the best, democracy's in the world. A people that actually care about the planet and what is happening etc. etc.
I know a place called Upware, which is reputed to be 5 miles from "anywhere". Perhaps that might suite.

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By Agutter Accounts
01st Oct 2021 10:34

Those are by no means uniquely English. We lack the US 1st Amendment rights some would say. The healthcare system is good but under severe pressure which predates the pandemic, but there are others equally good these days if not better. It certainly is not the most democratic country - because the electoral system is unrepresentative, the Lords is an unelected house of patronage and the Monarch retains significant residual powers like the Royal Prerogative which cannot be questioned by Parliament.

I live in an ex-mining village where I mind my own business and largely ignore the rubbish in the media. It will have to do because moving is not possible for a number of personal reasons.

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Replying to johnjenkins:
By Duggimon
01st Oct 2021 09:12

johnjenkins wrote:

You're quite right. Fuel cannot get to the pumps quick enough to service panic buying.
BP had a supply concern and this was taken to the media by the RHA.
Unfortunately there are people and bodies out there that still think they can make us get back in the EU and will do anything to try and bring down this Government, especially Boris, who, by the way, got in with a vast majority. We have been hand held by the EU for too many years, and thankfully we have a Government that is flexible and adaptable to take us into the future. This Government portrays the British people and our pro-active approach. Of course, nothing is perfect.

The RHA didn't take it to the press, the government only said they did. Grant Schapps blamed Rod McKenzie, the moaning remainer, for the leak. Rod McKenzie was not even in the meeting. The RHA only commented on the shortage after being questioned on it by journalists.

Everything you say is wrong, I understand it's the account presented by our own government but as has been evidenced many many times, our own government just lie about whatever they like whenever they like.

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