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How many of your clients would be ruined by Corbyn policies ?

15th Sep 2015
Director Maximiti Limited
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A new political leader is a major headline in any country . After all , it now becomes a real possibility that the person elected could be governing you , instead of it being a remote possibility . Personally I make no secret of my disdain for what the man stands for ( except perhaps for a willingness for a fairer society , which these days all politicians hanker after )  .

Nothing beats planning and however remote it may seem ,if his policies were implemented it could decimate the profits of some of your clients . Time to lift the phone and have some chats ?

If nothing else it is a great excuse to connect and double check they are still in business and using you for their year end accounts ! 

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By Old Greying Accountant
15th Sep 2015 22:38

I think we would all be ...

... on our way to hell in a hand cart!

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Locutus of Borg
By Locutus
15th Sep 2015 23:23

Heaven help us
I don't know too much about Corbynomics at the moment, other than it involves printing lots of money to boost public spending, renationalising the railways and electricity companies and jacking up the top rate of income tax to something like 70%.

That sort of thing never worked in the 1970s and I can't see it working now.

The state will get even more bloated, renationalised businesses will become more inefficient, the wealthy will flee abroad resulting in those left having to make up the tax shortfall and inflation will edge up as more money is printed and emboldened unions demand even more.

Added to that, the possibility that we could leave NATO, dismantle our nukes, run down our armed forces and hand over the Falklands to Argentina.

The worrying thing is that the SNP referendum campaign and the election of Syriza in Greece showed that a lot of people can be fooled by completely unworkable policies so long as you give the illusion of hope that the future will be better.

However, I suspect that Corbyn will be ousted in about 2 years. Most Labour MPs can't stand him and will turn on him when the opinion polls show no chance of making any headway in the English heartlands at the next election.

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Man of Kent
By Kent accountant
16th Sep 2015 00:46

Don't worry

@locutus - 2 years? I can't see him lasting 6 months.

the longer he stays the longer it will be before Labour possess a serious threat to the Tories.

My wife's family are all staunch Labour supporters, even they struggle to understand how Corbyn can be a successful leader.

The more people who read his policies, the more he will and the Labour party will be alienated from the popular vote. 

I wish I'd put £100 on him winning 3 months ago ;o)

 

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Norman Younger
By Norman Younger
16th Sep 2015 09:28

Corbyn and £100 bet

Funny -  had the same thought. I was wondering that if I put a small sum on every outsider in every vote , whether over the course of a year or two , would I be ahead or not ?

So Mr Corbyn has had a positive effect on me - he has got me thinking !

I think that is where anything positive about him comes to an abrupt end

Anyway I hope he gets a jolly good taste of his own medicine with everybody defying him 

Everybody wonders how Hitler got into power .......never say never

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Man of Kent
By Kent accountant
16th Sep 2015 09:35

Really looking forward...

...to PMQ's today.

Lets see if Cameron gives the new boy an easy ride on his first day...

...calm before the storm if he does.

 

Bets - as my Dad use to say - bet what you can afford to lose (without any misgivings ) - so I reckon your strategy would be worth a punt whether that's £5 or £500.

I've had those hunches a few times but never followed them up - perhaps its time for a change now!

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Norman Younger
By Norman Younger
16th Sep 2015 10:09

59.5% and the grassroots

How can somebody be a grassroot supporter if they simply shove three quid into an envelope , take the oath of allegiance and "hey presto" ?

He has been voted in by a motley crew of Greens and mischievous Tories , and everything else in between probably . The textbook says that it will be an impossibility for him to keep them all happy .

Anyway , can't wait for PMQ today - should be memorable

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Replying to sphericalaccountants:
By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
16th Sep 2015 10:22

.

Flying Scotsman wrote:

 

He has been voted in by a motley crew of Greens and mischievous Tories 

The stats don't back up that assertion, but dont that get in the way fo a good rant. 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-34221155

Party members back him overwhelmingly. 49.6% of the votes.  These are mainly the original members, not the new entrants, who backed him over 80%.

A lot of green support is essentially disaffected labour supporters dismayed by the "tory light" agenda of Labour. 

The "mischievous tories" is largely a press story with little base in reality. 

Do get your heads out of Tory press! The stories are pathetic quite frankly.

Private Eye did a good article on it in terms of "what Corbyn said" "what the headline is".

 

 

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By Wiganer Elaine
16th Sep 2015 10:44

National Anthem

Corbyn's decision to not sing the National Anthem is already causing concern amongst patriotic, monarchist Labour supporters - by whom I mean traditional working class Labour voters over the age of 55 as opposed to the young and idealistic voter or traditional left wing intelligentsia from middle/upper class backgrounds!

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By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
16th Sep 2015 11:20

.

@Wiganer, but that is his shtick. Principles.  If his principle is anti-monachy, then he wont sing it just to get votes.  That is the whole point of him, love or loathe his policies or opinions, he is being principled.  That rare quality is why some people like him.  I am not a big fan, but can see the appeal even if he does come over as an awkward [***]. 

I don't pray in religious building, as I am an atheist and think it would be hypocticial to do so.  That is not to say I wont attend family gatherings in a church, mosque or temple. I very much do, but I remain silent.  I am not sure if anyone notices or much cares. 

I do sing the national anthem however and fully respect others choice not to. It would be a very funny world in which it was compulsory to sing a certain songs.

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By ShirleyM
16th Sep 2015 11:52

I must admit I like the guy

That doesn't mean I agree with all he says, but he comes across as honest and true to his beliefs and I can't remember the last time I used that expression when referring to a politician.

He says what he thinks, rather than what people want to hear in order to win votes. H's taken a hell of a lot of stick but he has carried on and (as far as I am aware) he hasn't made any return scathing personal attacks, unlike every other politician on the planet. That alone makes a very welcome change.

I guess PMQ will be very interesting and although I usually avoid it like the plague, I will watch it today.

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By Wiganer Elaine
16th Sep 2015 11:54

Principles

@ireallyshouldkn..

Yes, I know, but it's those particular principles that are causing concern - you can be patriotic and believe the type of monarchy/democracy we have is better than a voted for President and still support Labour.

However, the question that arises is - will Labour under Corbyn still want patriotic monarchists in the party or will they be classed as traitors to the "greater cause"?

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Replying to Crouchy:
By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
16th Sep 2015 16:11

.

Wiganer Elaine wrote:

@ireallyshouldkn..

 

However, the question that arises is - will Labour under Corbyn still want patriotic monarchists in the party or will they be classed as traitors to the "greater cause"?

I am not sure how you get from a personal view of one person in a party, to imposing that view on others or making it official labour policy.  

That sounds like very poor logic, of the type used by tabloid journalists. 

A principled person can have those principles without forcing them on others and co-existing with people with different views.

Phoney Tony is a fairly serious Christian but that did not stop non-Christan's voting for him, it was simply never an issue.

 

 

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By mwngiol
16th Sep 2015 11:56

Anthem

If he doesn't support the monarchy and doesn't believe in any gods, how can he realistically be expected to sing a song urging a god to protect the monarch?

I think he's the right man for the job, assuming that the Labour party want to revert to their traditional position. And maybe it's good for the country to have an opposition which is more opposite?

But they haven't got a hope of being elected while he's in charge.

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By mwngiol
16th Sep 2015 11:59

@Shirley

Apparently he wants to change PMQ's so that it's less handbaggy and more polite, with some questions by the public. I kind of agree with him, but then again I do find PMQ's quite amusing.

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By ShirleyM
16th Sep 2015 12:04

Personally ....

I would rather have some serious discussion, and all politicians working together, rather than the constant point scoring that currently takes place.

I hope some of Corbyns honesty and gentlemanly approach rubs off on the other politicians. I also hope I won't have to eat my words once PMQ is over. :)

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Replying to SWAccountant:
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By Old Greying Accountant
16th Sep 2015 14:49

Agree with this ...

ShirleyM wrote:

I would rather have some serious discussion, and all politicians working together, rather than the constant point scoring that currently takes place.

I hope some of Corbyns honesty and gentlemanly approach rubs off on the other politicians. I also hope I won't have to eat my words once PMQ is over. :)

... the government is supposed to do what is best for the country, no one party will have all the answers and the grown up thing is for all parties to work together for the common good. Obviously some policies will be party led, but there are many that could be collaborated on, and even the party ones could have valuable input from the other perspectives!

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Man of Kent
By Kent accountant
16th Sep 2015 12:16

Love or loathe

I find that most Labour politicians come across as decent blokes (and ladies).

Most Tories appear as pompous privately educated pr$cks.

I would never vote Labour but would be quite happy to have a beer with plenty of their MP's.

Corbyn is principled and good on him for that. I don't believe he will be a successful leader for Labour.

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Man of Kent
By Kent accountant
16th Sep 2015 12:17

Nice hmmm

Well that was all very pleasant - lets see how long it lasts.

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Glenn Martin
By Glenn Martin
16th Sep 2015 12:55

Popularity Contest

The sad thing is that many who actually vote, don't fully understand the policies or the effect the elected will have in power, it really comes down to a popularity contest. Corbyn is just not likeable and will never appeal to the mass market of voters who are not extreme, the general population are middle of the road in their views and don't like wholesale change. Up north all MP's are pretty much Labour. I know my 2 local ones quite well and they are good constituency MP's and do a lot on a local basis but have never really had much of an impact at Westminster. Whilst I think Dave & George will have little to worry about from Corbyn, and I agree he will be ousted soon for not forming a credible opposition. The problem will be who is? For me all those who stood were weak and would not have made a good leader. That Chucka fella (ex shadow business guy, but cannot spell his name). was the only one I would have backed but he mysteriously  backed out early in the campaign. (I expected something to come out in the Sunday press about him but it never did). He spoke very well, and would have appealed to mass middle of the road voters, and would have been able to form a new, young and credible opposition to the government. I suspect now the Torys will be in power unchecked for many years and Dave may well look to a third term, unless he is sitting on a big cash offer to do something post PM. I often wonder how far someone like David Beckham would get if he was backed to take a public role, he is loved by the lions share of the nation, certainly more popular than any politician, would he win the mayor of London if he stood, I think he would. I am sure if Alan Shearer stood to be the elected Mayor of Newcastle he would win hands down. In nearby Hartlepool the football mascot (dressed in monkey suit) ran for mayor as a joke, but the backing of the football fans was enough for him to be elected 3 times. He actually did a half decent job for the town by all accounts.

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Red Leader
By Red Leader
16th Sep 2015 14:53

Corbyn effect

He's certanly made us all more interested in politics. A good thing, I think.

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By ShirleyM
16th Sep 2015 15:08

Just my opinion ...

If someone thinks the world is flat then I would rather they voiced their honest opinion. I have no respect (or liking) for yes-men and sycophants.

I would prefer politicians to be honest about what they stand for and represent, even if I disagree with them. They have had the courage to stand up and speak out.

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Replying to Wilson Philips:
By mwngiol
16th Sep 2015 15:29

Exactly

ShirleyM wrote:

If someone thinks the world is flat then I would rather they voiced their honest opinion. I have no respect (or liking) for yes-men and sycophants.

I would prefer politicians to be honest about what they stand for and represent, even if I disagree with them. They have had the courage to stand up and speak out.

And then you can base your decision of whether or not to vote for them on the basis of what they truly believe and represent.

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Replying to Paul Crowley:
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By Old Greying Accountant
16th Sep 2015 15:58

Except ....

mwngiol wrote:

ShirleyM wrote:

If someone thinks the world is flat then I would rather they voiced their honest opinion. I have no respect (or liking) for yes-men and sycophants.

I would prefer politicians to be honest about what they stand for and represent, even if I disagree with them. They have had the courage to stand up and speak out.

And then you can base your decision of whether or not to vote for them on the basis of what they truly believe and represent.

... our deformed electoral system makes you vote for someone you are indifferent to in order to keep someone out you oppose rather than vote for the person you want! 

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Norman Younger
By Norman Younger
16th Sep 2015 16:10

PMQ

I turned off after a few minutes . Completely sanitised and artificially polite

If that man gets anywhere near being our PM I would make serious plans to leave the country and I reckon thousands more would be lined up behind me

His barmy unworkable and anti-everything policies are cloaked in the veneer of sincerity (which he may well be) 

If he declares that terrorist groups are his friends , should he not be arrested for promoting terror ?

Is it 999 or 101 I need to ring.....???

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Replying to Calculatorboy:
Red Leader
By Red Leader
16th Sep 2015 16:39

the world is ending

Flying Scotsman wrote:

I turned off after a few minutes . Completely sanitised and artificially polite

If that man gets anywhere near being our PM I would make serious plans to leave the country and I reckon thousands more would be lined up behind me

His barmy unworkable and anti-everything policies are cloaked in the veneer of sincerity (which he may well be) 

If he declares that terrorist groups are his friends , should he not be arrested for promoting terror ?

Is it 999 or 101 I need to ring.....???

Calm down, dear!

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Replying to Calculatorboy:
By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
16th Sep 2015 16:45

.

Flying Scotsman wrote:

 

If he declares that terrorist groups are his friends , should he not be arrested for promoting terror ?

Eh?  Again this is just tosh. 

What he actually said was more along the lines of, if you want to resolve conflict you need to sit down with the two side and talk it out.

One of these "terrorist" groups is the elected government in Gaza.  Hamas.  I would suggest myself the Isreali government are acting more like terrorists than Hamas but it depends on your view point I guess, but it seems OK to talk to them. 

Division worked so well in Northern Ireland.  The "troubles" only got better when people got talking to each other rather than shooting and bombing each other. He also supported Nelson Mandela when us brits branded him a terrorist but is now a demi-god.

I thought accountants were supposed to be smart and ask questions?

 

 

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Replying to Wanderer:
Norman Younger
By Norman Younger
16th Sep 2015 21:39

Corbyn and terrorists

Just listened to the interview to double check. He admitted calling the terrorists friends . And during the interview he lost his temper. A vile man. No ifs no buts - a vile man.

Perhaps there are times to engage with those who promote terror , this may or may not be one of them . But it does NOT make them your friends unless you really want to cosy up to them and put them on your xmas card list and espouse what they stand for - mass indiscriminate murder and genocide 

It is important that people know these things - that is smart 

 

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By ShirleyM
16th Sep 2015 16:14

Sign the petition :)

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/104317

Better hurry as you've only got until 6th January 2016 to sign, but so far it looks like nobody is that bothered, which is a shame but is typical of the apathy regarding UK politics.

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Replying to Calculatorboy:
Red Leader
By Red Leader
16th Sep 2015 16:38

done

ShirleyM wrote:

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/104317

Better hurry as you've only got until 6th January 2016 to sign, but so far it looks like nobody is that bothered, which is a shame but is typical of the apathy regarding UK politics.

Just signed it! Thanks.

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By justsotax
16th Sep 2015 17:01

I don't really know

much about him...but it would be refreshing if a politician actually said what he thought rather than wait for a spin doctor to suggest the most beneficial way to address a subject matter in order to preserve the loyalty of supporters etc etc. (bull[***] baffles brains and all that).

 

I guess we will have to wait and see if he abandons his 'beliefs' and 'principles' a quickly a DC does. 

 

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Sarah Douglas - HouseTree Business Ltd
By sarah douglas
16th Sep 2015 20:38

PMQ was terrible mind numbing

It was difficult to stay awake listening to Corbyn.   It was mind numbing.  

When they did the election  debates and someone asked a question .  One of them was called Charlotte .  Then every one of the politicians went on repeating her name as if they were friends and her name was mention over 30 times.   It is patronising drippable  and it bored the audience. 

He is on to a loser because even people to the left slightly do not see why a hardworking man or woman who work say on a low wage should  come out worse off then a family on benefits that do not bother working.   Of course in society we should look after the disabled and the old.  I feel strongly about that but that is different to paying out money to people who refuse to work for any wage. 

I have far more respect for someone who works for a low wage  then a person who refuses to work for that wage because they previously were in a better job, student or just cannot be bothered. 

The sooner the man is gone the better.  The Northern Ireland shadow secretary wanted to stay on in this time of crisis which will affect businesses in NI and he sacked him 5 mins after he wanted to stay.  He is a dangerous man and he has a temper.  The NI situation is extremely serious again.   I am really annoyed with him for his attitude toward NI and the way he was with the reporters people are bothering me.  If he does not like it then don,t try to be PM  

It body language is awful.  I have  liped  read from a young age because of my hearing and his body language does not match what he is saying. 

  

 

 

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Replying to whitevanman:
Norman Younger
By Norman Younger
16th Sep 2015 21:35

Sacking the NI shadow

The NI shadow , Ivan Lewis is my local MP and a very good constituency man at that. Our politics often clash but we respect each other and work well on projects for the greater good of the community where we both live.

If JC cannot recognise a good and well intentioned career politician who I believe is in it for the genuine good then his judgment is seriously flawed and he is not fit for purpose . Perhaps there was a hidden agenda in the sacking and we should know what it is - could it be that Ivan Lewis was a Blair man ? 

 

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Locutus of Borg
By Locutus
16th Sep 2015 22:14

Corbyn seems a bit like George Galloway to me

Both were fully paid up members of the "awkward squad" on the far left of the Labour Party (before Galloway left to form his own).  I'm not sure how much they really believed in their cause, but they seemed to both revel in being awkward.

As their views (often anti-capitalist, anti-America, etc) were so extreme, the general public never really cared too about much what they said, as they would never hold positions of real responsibility.  If they met with extremists linked to the IRA, Hamas or in the case of Galloway Saddam Hussein himself, most of the public would just roll their eyes, as that is just what they did to get attention.

Now, because the attraction and novelty, of a politician saying what he actually thinks without running past a spin doctor, Corbyn finds himself in charge.  He will find it challenging to make those difficult decisions, which in the past he could so easily criticise with no thought of the consequences.

Like Flying Scotsman says, Corbyn behind his easy going exterior has a temper.  In the coming weeks and months with constant nagging of the Government, the media and some Labour MPs, that will be exposed.

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Sarah Douglas - HouseTree Business Ltd
By sarah douglas
17th Sep 2015 07:40

totally agree flying Scotsman

It is not the time to play petty politics in NI and changing people over at a whim  my understanding was Ivan is a respected individual.   Not a Blair fan but NI is on tender hooks at the minute. 

I watched that interview where he lost his temper and my husband and I argue over it.   If you take out what the interviewer said or did not say for a minute.  The simple fact was JC lost it and was really aggressive.  What went through my head was wow you have a temper if you don,t get your own way.  How could anyone like him ever be at the table in NI.  There is no way he could handle it or any diplomatic situation in fact I could see him making it worse.   

The simple fact was he may not have liked the reporter but if that is the way he copes when someone disagrees with him he is not fit for PM. Maybe his temper is why he does not like the media.  If he is such a man of the people then how come he could not even engage with reporters.

 He was happy to have his wife about before they started asking questions about her business. This is his 3rd wife he spilt up with one of them over schooling.  I guess it was his way or the highway.   

He also tried to claim in his speech about his wife would be kept out of the media more then any other politician as if this was something new and great and he had been hard done by .  Alex Salmond has always kept his wife out of media and the media respected that even the media that does not like him and they could have gone to town on Alex Salmond with his wife been a lot older but they did,nt. 

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By ShirleyM
17th Sep 2015 09:03

Give the guy a chance

He's new to it all. I didn't see a loss of temper at all. I saw a big sign of frustration finally escaping. The interviewer just wanted to promote the worst impression he could give of Corbyn, and wouldn't let him explain so Corbyn stood his ground (maybe too strongly) but there were faults on both sides.

The press, the Tories, and the rest of the world are smearing him by taking his words out of context and expecting him to have the 'polish' that most senior politicians have. Whatever he does there is a big mass of media and others ready and waiting to use it to smear him.

It's the lack of polish that appeals. Others have really lost their temper at times (Boris Johnson and John Prescott to name just two) but I don't think any less of them. It just makes them human, rather than the sanitized PC machines that we are accustomed to.

Before anyone thinks I am biased, I do not vote Labour, and took no part in the voting. The big smear campaigns are likely to get him the sympathy vote, and so far, he has behaved admirably by not retaliating with personal attacks and twisting the words of others. Maybe (I say this with great hope) he can bring respect, honesty, and a 'grown up' attitude to politics

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Sarah Douglas - HouseTree Business Ltd
By sarah douglas
17th Sep 2015 09:19

Yes but I don.t like politicians

Yes but I do not like politicians who lose their temper no matter what party they are in.   if they have to lose their temper then they have lost their argument.  JC very much lost his temper on Channel 4.    What is his excuse for sacking the NI Shadow Secretary when he said he wanted to continue , This hardly shows respect or grown up politics .  

 He was not turning his back on JC.   I will not be giving him a second chance he show his colours sacking NI Secretary.  

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By ShirleyM
17th Sep 2015 09:24

Agreed, Sarah

Loss of temper (I saw frustration rather than loss of temper) isn't admirable, but then he was severely provoked. This isn't an excuse, but combined with his inexperience it makes it more understandable.

I don't know why he sacked him, so I can't answer your question.

I don't understand why political parties run smear campaigns (well, I do, but I can't understand why people don't use their own judgement instead of blindly believing what they are told in smear campaigns). I don't understand why politicians stick to 'trickle down' economics either. I don't understand lots of things!

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Sarah Douglas - HouseTree Business Ltd
By sarah douglas
17th Sep 2015 10:08

I am not saying he was not provoked

But PM will always be provoked.  I do not like smear campaigns but all that is happened is he had a free ride and now he is is a higher position he is being scrutinised.    I do think he could tidy himself up a bit.  But for me his body language does not match when he speaks and that is what worries me the most.   No matter if I like someone or not if a individual is saying what they think the body language matches regardless of nerves.  

 

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By ShirleyM
17th Sep 2015 10:07

Do you think he needs more training Sarah?

Someone one to dress him, teach him what to say, teach him what gestures he should use, what he can say to the voting public, and what he can't and which words he can use? ps. What's wrong with 'swarm' when referring to a large number of people? The expectations of the public (driven by the media)  are getting downright pathetic,

Leave him be, let us see the real JC, and then we can decide whether we like him or not!

I hope he never resorts to the dirty tactics that most politicians and political parties employ. He will go way down in my estimation if he does that.

EDIT: a free ride? He's been attacked from all quarters, but the fact is ... the labour members and the party voted him in! Why?

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Sarah Douglas - HouseTree Business Ltd
By sarah douglas
17th Sep 2015 10:21

training

Well as far as I am concerned I have always lip read so no amount of training will change his body language it does not work that way.

 When my husband was a paid councillor for 5 years he refused to wear a suit and yes he was well liked.  But I did not like that it and it annoyed me that he would not make the effort to wear the suit.  He was excellent at his job and extremely caring but there were plenty of others who did not like the fact he did not wear a suit including my mum and me.   It is the way of life and no he did not wear the suit and neither did I change my mind about the suit.    I am terrible at choosing clothes so sometimes I go to John Lewis and pay for a personal shopper that does not make me fake.

 I felt on top of the world when I attended a event in London and everyone commented on my dress.  I am very talented at other things but sometimes it is good to be open to advise

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By ShirleyM
17th Sep 2015 10:32

Your choice, Sarah

Different people have different views. What is important to one is irrelevant to another. It doesn't make one wrong, and the other right ... just different.

I don't like current politics where everything is a facade, few of them admit to their errors, and everyone uses spin, spin and more spin.

If JC can change that (even just a little) then he will have achieved something. He seems to be a marmite character (like Nicola Sturgeon) where people either love him or loathe him.

I think we should give him a chance to do some good, as I think he is an honest and refreshing breath of fresh air to politics. It's good that someone (anyone) holds the government to account, but the more their views differ, the more effective it will be. How useful would it be if they all held exactly the same views and represented the same section of the community? 

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Sarah Douglas - HouseTree Business Ltd
By sarah douglas
17th Sep 2015 10:56

Agreed Shirley

But whether he likes it or not it has to talk to the media.  He is never going to get anywhere if he does not.  I personally do not find him honest but yes I agreed that is my personal opinion.  I find him patronising and he have given no honest reason as to why he sacked the NI shadow Secretary other then for his own political gains as opposed to what was right to do. 

What did he achieve yesterday at PMQ other then repeating himself he did not even dent DC yesterday.

Yes I really do hope he gets a move on and with a bit of Umph and does actually challenge the Government as that is always needed regardless of which party you support.  Yesterday was like talk radio show.

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By mwngiol
17th Sep 2015 11:09

Leader

Surely it's his prerogative as leader to choose his own team for his own reasons? Leaders don't tend to publicly  list their reasons for removing someone from a position. And at the end of the day this was only a Shadow minister, so there's no continuity issues.

JC is clearly old school left wing. He obviously wants his cabinet to reflect his own views or at least be compatible with them. Why should one shadow minister be exempt from being changed?

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Norman Younger
By Norman Younger
17th Sep 2015 11:11

Sanitised PMQ

Isn't it funny how we all grumble about the "yaboosucks" schoolboy atmosphere at PMQ . Along comes somebody who tries to force wholesale changes and what happens ? We all grumble about how boring it is !

I think that in today's personal brand age PMQ plays a more important role than ever in observing how our elected leaders behave under pressure 

Whether we like it or not , we vote for personalities as well as policies - it is just a question of how to blend them

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By ShirleyM
17th Sep 2015 11:28

Agreed again, Sarah

Just give him a chance. Nobody expects him to be PM (unless there are major changes) but he can do a hell of a lot of good in opposition.

He has a lot to learn, and let's hope he doesn't change his good attributes, along with the bad. I fear the PC brigade will win in the end, though.

Personally, I much preferred the new version of PMQ. I like hearing the questions and answers that worry ordinary folk, rather than put downs and constant harping. No doubt it will become more animated in time, but I can't stand the silly school playground stuff that normally dominates. Government is a serious business that affects us all and if I want entertainment in preference to serious discussion then I'll watch something else.

ps. I don't think JC tried to 'force' anything. He isn't in a position to force anything on anyone (other than his own party), is he? He just hasn't joined in with the usual backbiting, smear campaigns, personal attacks, and the schoolboy antics. All the more credit to him.

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Sarah Douglas - HouseTree Business Ltd
By sarah douglas
17th Sep 2015 13:00

No problem giving him a chance

But why then did labour not support the SNP about Clapping instead of the nonsense of Hear Year and Shouting like school boys and donkeys.   I am all for change but they were  quite happy taking a dig at another party for clapping. 

So yes let there be clapping and new style of PMQs what is good for the goose is good for the gander. 

So the JC and the labour party want support from all when it suits him.   

 

 

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By ShirleyM
17th Sep 2015 12:00

If you want to discuss the SNP ...

... then I'm out of this discussion.

The SNP have made it clear that they want independence from the UK, and to divide the UK, and that is their priority over all else. 

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Sarah Douglas - HouseTree Business Ltd
By sarah douglas
17th Sep 2015 13:05

Polls have reported 30 Percent of People who voted for SNP

did not vote for independence.   But that is not really my point.  It was about the behaviour of the PMQ,s and having a different style

 My main point was that Labour did not support the more civilised action of clapping over shouting at each other but now we are expected to think JC is new and interesting.  Loads of MP's from all parties where saying this.  

 

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Man of Kent
By Kent accountant
17th Sep 2015 12:49

Personalities or policies

Personalities every time - Blair, Cameron, Thatcher.

Brown is an excellent politician but a poor party leader,Milliband (Ed) was a poor leader.Both had a lack of leadership credibility, to the question 'can this person be an effective leader of our country' the answer was a resounding no.

The vast majority of the public vote for personalities. 

Labour have got it badly wrong with their last three leaders.

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By ShirleyM
17th Sep 2015 13:12

OK Sarah

I am not supporting JC, or the Labour party.

I am trying to see how he can benefit the country ... not the Labour party. I don't care a toss about the Labour Party, but I hate all this sniping, smearing and backbiting before he's even got his feet under the table.

I hope he can help bring more honesty to politics, and help reduce the spin that is so prevalent today. Once he gets into the swing of things I hope he will make the government more accountable too.

To be blunt, why are you supporting the SNP? This is a serious question. Don't they want to increase welfare and haven't they opposed the welfare bill?

I should have added hyprocites to yes-men and sycophants, as they are all equally disliked by me. The SNP are at the top of my 'hypocrite list'. They already have a far superior benefit system compared to the rest of the UK, but they want more, and couldn't care a toss that the rest of the UK don't have the benefits that they receive.

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