Partner An unnamed firm
Columnist
Share this content
Tags:

Women are inferior to men

23rd Nov 2015
Partner An unnamed firm
Columnist
Share this content

This is the first of two articles about gender issues. After reading it some readers might want to stick it to the anonymous poster. But please wait for the second before sharpening those knives.

Sadly, half of the people reading this blog are probably nodding at the headline and wondering what all the fuss is about, while their spouses are spitting blood. I have written this article in response to the latest statistics showing that women in the UK earn 19% less than men.

You would need to investigate more carefully to understand exactly what this statistic means, but it still comes as a shock when equality is taken as a given.

If two people are sitting side by side and doing the same job, I would love their employer to explain why one is getting paid more than the other if the only difference between them is gender.

Going a step further, with transgender issues becoming more prevalent, perhaps some women already considering a change of gender to get something close to a 20% pay rise?

Perhaps I should justify the provocative headline. Increasingly, in sporting contexts the media and society in general is being asked to regard women’s endeavours as equivalent to men’s.

This is generally a nonsense. While men and women have been competing on an equal basis for generations in sports such as equestrianism, this just does not work elsewhere.

Physiques are completely different and on average men are simply stronger than their female counterparts. In athletics, swimming and cycling, for example, the results speak for themselves, since the world record speeds achieved by men are far faster than those of women.

Similarly, if the best female rugby, cricket and soccer teams in the world pitted themselves against their male equivalents the results would be embarrassing, with serious risk to life and limb. As for boxing…

Where this thesis should fall down is in almost every other walk of human life. Through history, there have been fewer women succeeding as writers, composers, politicians and in the world of business.

This has nothing to do with talent and would appear to be the consequence of prejudice, ignorance and, to be slightly fairer, the fact that many women sacrifice careers to the joys of bearing children and bringing up a family.

Perhaps it is time for a reassessment. If women around the world begin to accept their limitations and strengths, maybe those in power (typically men) in the world of business etc, etc might finally begin to take steps to close that 19% pay gap and ensure that all jobs are determined on merit and the ability to do them rather than bias.  

Tags:

You might also be interested in

Replies (8)

Please login or register to join the discussion.

By ShirleyM
23rd Nov 2015 21:34

I guess the title was intended ...

... to get all the females stamping their feet and wailing out loud?

What happens then? Will the wisecracks start?

Society is pre-conditioned to accept sexual discrimination as being the norm, similar to Pavlov's dog. It happens all the time, and so many people take it for granted and don't stop to question it, or even question why they take part in it. I honestly think many men (and women) don't realise how sexist their comments are, as it is such an ingrained habit.

Maybe it is more of a sore point with the older generation of workers like myself, as we were openly discriminated against before the Equality Act. I eventually got my opportunity, but how many intelligent and capable women didn't, and got stuck in a lifetime of menial jobs? I hope that the younger women of today have never experienced discrimination by employers or male colleagues, but that is a forlorn hope when you look at the stats.

Personally, I think it will be a lot harder for females now that the Unions are being weakened and strangled by the government. They were the driving force behind equal pay and equal opportunities in my day.

Luckily for me, I work for myself. I won't get sacked or demoted for being a bolshy 'feminazi'. :)

EDIT: I am not feminazi. I believe in equal rights for both sexes but it seems to be in regular use for women who highlight inequality. I admit to being bolshy, but only for a good cause. :)

Thanks (0)
By Tim Vane
24th Nov 2015 00:20

I thought we'd already covered all this in a previous thread last week.

https://www.accountingweb.co.uk/anyanswers/question/bookkeeping-rate-pay

Was there really any need to drag it all up again? I think that both the title and the post are deliberate trolling and totally unnecessary.

Thanks (0)
By cheekychappy
24th Nov 2015 09:21

I’ve never generally understood the argument for women being paid the same as men in a lot of sports.

Men’s football generates much more revenue than women’s football. I think it is therefore fair that the male counterpart gets paid more.

There has been an argument for the prize money at Wimbledon to be the same for men and women. Maybe the female tennis players could consider playing the same amount of sets as the male tennis players to bring their pay more in line?

However, in the workplace, if two people are doing the same job, gender should not be a consideration for their pay.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By More Tea Vicar
24th Nov 2015 11:52

Wimbledon is equal

cheekychappy wrote:
There has been an argument for the prize money at Wimbledon to be the same for men and women. Maybe the female tennis players could consider playing the same amount of sets as the male tennis players to bring their pay more in line?

More than just an argument, Wimbledon prize money has been equal for around 8 years now - difference before that was around 10% I think.

Thanks (0)
By cheekychappy
24th Nov 2015 12:37

Shows how much I pay attention to tennis.

 

Do women now do the same amount of sets as the men?

Thanks (0)
avatar
By More Tea Vicar
24th Nov 2015 13:23

No

cheekychappy wrote:

Do women now do the same amount of sets as the men?

 

No

Thanks (0)
Glenn Martin
By Glenn Martin
24th Nov 2015 13:13

I would be keen to see the maths behind the figures.

How do they come up with the figures?

Do they take a 1000 random mens and womans salaries work an average out and compare.

If so the sample could be flawed which is why it produces the figure it does, could include more 

minimum wage style roles etc,

I find it hard to believe in say an accountancy firm that if you had 2 managers with equal responsibilities that the man would be 20% better paid, and rightly so.

There are tribunals to stop this and I would be staggered if a woman would work side by side with someone when she is so underpaid.

When it comes to sport its a no brainer and it is clear why men in general are better paid.

I notice there is a bit of issue in Hollywood that women do not attract the same fees as men do and their is much bra burning over it.

This is not a gender issue as made out, but a financial one. Movies that are financially more successful have men in the leading roles. Thats a fact.

So that is why Jennifer Aniston does not command the same fee for her latest romcom that Daniel Craig would were being the iconic Bond.

If Bond was a woman it would be poor to watch.

If Rocky was played by a woman it would be just a crap film.

Men don't make these rules, its the general public 51% of which are women.

The most difficult thing with equality is that people are just not equal and trying to make

everything equal only results in falsely boosted someone or holding back another in the hope of creating a false utopian world where all things balance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks (0)
avatar
By Alan Davies
24th Nov 2015 17:27

Statistics

As usual poor statistics are to blame for what sounds like a horrific inequality.  These days it is hard to find the same job that pays differently between genders - where the problem lies now is that fewer women are in the higher paid jobs.  This is something that will right itself over time as the more equal younger workforce comes through the ranks.  To those that doubt this accountancy now has more female trainees than male so it would very difficult for this not to happen.  

I look forward to the second part of this blog in the hope that it discusses these issues in a better way. 

 

Thanks (0)