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What to do when you have to change direction

At the start of the year, Zoe Whitman knew exactly what business goals she wanted to achieve, and then Covid-19 hit.

19th May 2020
Founder But the Books
Columnist
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One of the tools I particularly enjoyed learning about when I did my NLP training was visualising the completion of a goal before you’ve even started work on it. Once you’ve done that, you can think back to the challenges you’ve overcome along the way, and it makes it so much easier when you come up against problems because in your mind, you’ve already done whatever you set out to do.

In January I wrote about setting New Year’s resolutions. My son had just started nursery and excited to have some child-free work time, I intended to fit a gym routine into my workday. I knew what my stumbling blocks would be; being double-booked, not having my gym kit ready in the morning, not actually signing up with the gym… Building habits which meant I could get myself ready and to the gym on autopilot meant I would do it. I had 11 glorious weeks at the gym before Covid-19 locked us down.

I think it’s reasonable to admit that I didn’t visualise a pandemic, and I suspect none of us planned that into our Q1 business goals either. Being at home full time with two pre-schoolers doesn’t make for a productive work environment and I’ve made some pretty drastic decisions in my business over the last month or so.

In fact, things will probably take quite a different direction for me after this so I’ve had to pivot and set myself new goals based on what’s important going forward.

As I’ve spent the last few weeks drawing ballerinas for my daughter, inventing craft projects and making sure nobody eats too much sand out of the sandpit, I've been picturing my life as one big Venn diagram. There’s family and the idea that potentially the children won’t be in childcare as much, earning a living and keeping up with some personal interests. The happy place is where these different aspects of life can meet without too much conflict. That means working on some__inlJh sann diagram. There’s fa

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