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Brexit: Talking to clients without causing offence

18th Feb 2019
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Philip Fisher warns accountancy firms to talk about Brexit tactfully or otherwise, clients might orchestrate their own exit.

Ignoring what leaving the European Union might do to the country, its businesses and its inhabitants, for good or bad, the Brexit process has had a further particularly heinous side-effect.

In a fashion that few of us can probably ever remember, it has managed to divide even the most close-knit communities.

Both the Conservative Party and the Labour Party are indulging in internecine warfare from which either or both might never recover. Contrarily, alliances are being built across political divides, although you have to imagine that these will only be temporary.

In the same way, families have become split and friendships ended over almost certainly fallacious expectations about what might actually happen when (or conceivably if) Britain finally decides to take the great step into the unknown.

The odds are that any firm with a staff of more than eight or 10 people is likely to include at least two who will hold violently opposing views.

One task for those charged with running practices is ensuring that they operate smoothly. If colleagues either are not speaking to each other or, worse, shouting at each other, this is hardly a recipe for peace and harmony, let alone optimal profitability.

While it may not be easy, partners or staff managers need to negotiate these difficulties by whatever means, presumably demanding that any conversation regarding Europe is off-limits during working hours.

That might seem like an insuperable task, particularly if some of the individuals involved are hot-headed. However, your practice also faces a far more damaging danger.

As we all know, clients are individuals who often have very strong views about their organisations, their personal affairs and the world in general. More particularly, those who have the will to build up profitable businesses are often single-minded many of whom are likely to object to anybody or anything that gets in their way.

A significant proportion of those on whom your prosperity relies could well be vehemently in favour of leaving Europe. Or they may be equally motivated by a desire to remain within a 28 country structure. While others could have somewhat obscure views about a particular way of reaching a final position, for example stepping out of the game without reaching any kind of a deal or going back to the people for a second referendum.

As all of us will have found when discussing these issues with family, friends and colleagues it’s easy to reach a disagreement if not actually come to blows. While getting into a fight with your brother-in-law and entering a long period of silence is not the worst thing in the world, the client equivalent could be.

Therefore, if it isn’t already too late, every firm should consider running training courses to ensure that staff are instructed to keep their views to themselves when in the presence of clients and armed with strategies for doing so tactfully.

It has always been a good policy to avoid discussing politics with clients since if yours differ from theirs, that might just be the catalyst for those highly valued business associates who have preserved and promoted your business to move elsewhere.

Now, with a particularly inflammatory and provocative new source of dissension, this could be exacerbated to the extent that not one but a whole stream of clients is offended by what might be perfectly valid views expressed by you, a partner or a member of staff.

In principle, these situations should be manageable. But is it really worth taking the chance that your practice could be severely damaged because a junior auditor told either Sir James Dyson or Michael O’Leary from Ryanair that their opposing views on Europe were idiotic?

That may be unlikely, but a few too many words out of place in an audit closure meeting could just mean that a loyal client becomes an ex-client.

Replies (37)

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Hallerud at Easter
By DJKL
18th Feb 2019 16:07

Given accountants get a lot of practice biting their tongue over the stupidity of clients, Brexit is merely one additional area where clients can be obtuse.

Merely check that what they ought to consider re business stability they have considered. They may have decided risk, need to do something, no risk, business as usual, but our role is to ensure they have at least considered the position.

This is where the smaller one man accountancy firm may have an edge, with my clients I know which ones are directly exposed to international trade both re their sales and purchases so can ask things like, have you applied/got your EORI number, have you considered increasing stock from x in Eire or y in the Netherlands before March?

I of course have the current luxury of being like Rhett Butler re whether I keep my clients or not, "Frankly, my dear, I do not give a damn"

Imho pointing out the obvious and moving on is the way to proceed.

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By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
18th Feb 2019 17:54

I am really enjoying the anguish from some friends of ours (I dont act) who both voted for Brexit.

They run a small tech manufacturing company, for whom 90% of their sales are exports, with a 8-12 week build time. (Its all bespoke stuff)

The have had to guarantee the sales prices on most sales, or shut up the factory. If we drop out of the EU its going cost them tens of thousands of pounds if default WTO tariffs are imposed, and many markets will be out of reach.

The friend is livid, blaming all and sundry. He thinks the EU are being difficult but will 'back down'. I think they are being somewhat more accomodating that I had expected myself.

As I recall he voted for brexit on the curious basis that the UK on its own had better clout than the EU and would get better trade deals. I have yet to have it explained why that might be. Probably not the best time to ask.

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Chris M
By mr. mischief
18th Feb 2019 18:17

I am happy to air my views on Brexit when a client raises the issue.

Helpfully the local Chamber of Commerce has issued a list of 20 questions and sent this to all local MPs. Twenty questions all fundamental to how we do business in April, none of them as yet answered by a Government blatantly putting party before country. Robert Peel is spinning in his grave.

All clients with specific risk issues are aware of what they need - like EORI numbers. Also the fact that I am prepared to bet £5,000 at even money that the UK enters a formal recession by the time the fourth quarter 2019 GDP numbers are out. So not the time to borrow up to the hilt and bet the house.

I have posted this bet all over the internet, including with at least 100 prominent and very loud-mouthed Brexiteers. You'd think this would be £5,000 of easy money, after all per their posts Brexit will transform this country into a land of milk and honey and the USA and China had better watch out in terms of the GDP tables.

Total bets received to date = £5.
Funds still available for the bet should you want it 4,995.

So if you are a Brexiteer numpty still dreaming of unicorns, don't bother coming in to this thread to witter on about the land of milk and honey. Just put your money down.

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Replying to mr. mischief:
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By meadowsaw227
19th Feb 2019 10:14

I honestly couldn't give a damn about brexit, recession or the coming of the three horsemen of the apocalypse.
I have planned for the worst case scenario so it can only get better.
Plenty of supplies, liquidity, upped security and protection
Lets see what happens !
Oh and I'm a "Brexit numpty"

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Replying to mr. mischief:
7om
By Tom 7000
19th Feb 2019 10:15

It will be ok, because in the next election the Torys will be out and JC4PM will ride in on his white charger and save us all by nationalising everything and putting taxes up.

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By JDBENJAMIN
19th Feb 2019 10:35

If someone you don't know offers you a bet, you would be a fool to take it, as there is no way of holding them to it if they lose that is worth the time and effort. It likely that is the reason your offer has not been taken. It is certainly the only reason I don't take you up on it for a lot more than £5. Don't flatter yourself that you are making any real point by offering this bet.

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Replying to mr. mischief:
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By nicdell
19th Feb 2019 10:38

"Brexiteer numpty"? Since when has insulting people been seen as the best way to influence people and persuade them to see your side of the argument? One might have expected better from the soi disant 'better educated, more intelligent' side of the divide. There is plenty written on both sides of the debate by very clever, informed and experienced commentators. We should all try to understand and appreciate the views of others - and always show humility and politeness - or the country will remain divided forever. The road from chaos to civilisation depends solely on kindness.

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Replying to nicdell:
By djn24
19th Feb 2019 11:09

nicdell wrote:

"Brexiteer numpty"? Since when has insulting people been seen as the best way to influence people and persuade them to see your side of the argument? One might have expected better from the soi disant 'better educated, more intelligent' side of the divide. There is plenty written on both sides of the debate by very clever, informed and experienced commentators. We should all try to understand and appreciate the views of others - and always show humility and politeness - or the country will remain divided forever. The road from chaos to civilisation depends solely on kindness.


Couldn't agree more. It's comments like this that have caused the division in the country. Just because you disagree with the outcome of a vote doesn't give you the right the brandish everyone who voted differently to you as a numpty. Very insulting.
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Replying to mr. mischief:
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By jon dickinson
19th Feb 2019 11:00

Hi Mr Mischief

I'm a Brexiteer and happy to wager £500 with you on this bet?
Who holds the stake money?

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Replying to jon dickinson:
Chris M
By mr. mischief
19th Feb 2019 11:40

We set up an escrow account which needs both of us to agree to withdraw the funds.

I use the following accepted defintion of the word numpty, albeit the amusing side of it is rapidly wearing off:

"Someone who (sometimes unwittingly) by speech or action demonstrates a lack of knowledge or misconception of a particular subject or situation to the amusement of others."

Those who voted Brexit were not numpties but were fooled into it by the very worst sort of politicians, many of whom have since hedged their bets by taking out foreign passports and moving their businesses and investments overseas.

Project Brexit is now so obviously Project Car Crash - literally in the case of Honda, Nissan and probably also Toyota before long - that pursuing a No Deal Brexit is quite simply the stupidest thing this country has done in my lifetime, barring being George W bush's poodle in Iraq in 2003.

When your strategy is in tatters, only a numpty in my book carries on with that strategy. In my own business, when things don't work I don't carry on doing them in the same old blundering unsuccessful way, I change strategy to success.

Surely that is not too much to expect from the folks running the country?

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Replying to mr. mischief:
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By jon dickinson
19th Feb 2019 12:15

Hi

Send me the escrow details and I will forward my stake today. You may not have belief in the UK but I do:-)

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Replying to mr. mischief:
By djn24
19th Feb 2019 13:51

mr. mischief wrote:

Those who voted Brexit were not numpties but were fooled into it by the very worst sort of politicians, many of whom have since hedged their bets by taking out foreign passports and moving their businesses and investments overseas.

Project Brexit is now so obviously Project Car Crash - literally in the case of Honda, Nissan and probably also Toyota before long - that pursuing a No Deal Brexit is quite simply the stupidest thing this country has done in my lifetime, barring being George W bush's poodle in Iraq in 2003.

When your strategy is in tatters, only a numpty in my book carries on with that strategy. In my own business, when things don't work I don't carry on doing them in the same old blundering unsuccessful way, I change strategy to success.

Surely that is not too much to expect from the folks running the country?


I agree that lies were told but that's true of both sides. To say that they were fooled is a bit naive in my opinion.
The car manufacturers are not leaving the UK solely because if Brexit. Japan has brokered a deal with the EU to remove tariffs so I think they would have been moving operations back to Japan with or without brexit. Many of the car manufacturers have been caught out by a change in trends accross europe- diesel scams etc. Again, I think their moves would have happened anyway.

Until the dust settles, we won't know how this will affect us long term but I hope the country has made the right choice.

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Replying to djn24:
Chris M
By mr. mischief
19th Feb 2019 15:37

No doubt the same car industry argument also applies to Panasonic, Sony and the various investment banks who have already acted without waiting for the full mess to reveal itself.

Unless you've been asleep you can't have failed to notice that this country has seriously damaged its relations with Japan over this, which until very recently was one of the "Great White Hopes" of Brexit.

At the time of the vote I was 30% a Brexiteer. When the facts change, I change my mind. What do you do?

I am now 1% Brexiteer because I know a botch job when I see one.

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By nicdell
19th Feb 2019 15:51

The only really important percentage to aim for is the avoidance of 100% smug. No matter how right we think we are (and it's rarely the case that we are as right as we think we are), it never illuminates and it always irritates. The danger is that the appearance of intransigent stupidity (whatever the reality) alienates those you want to convince.

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Replying to jon dickinson:
Chris M
By mr. mischief
19th Feb 2019 18:53

transpact.com

I am posting this site in case anyone else wants a piece of the action. The bet is that at some point between now and when the official UK GDP figures for Quarter 4 2019 are published, there will have been 2 consecutive quarters of negative GDP growth, which is the generally accepted definition of recession. So the outcome of the bet may not be known until this time next year - as reported in countryeconomy.com or an alternative website of your choice that I concur with.

Happy to go to £5,000 but if £500 is all you are up for then fair enough I'll match whatever you put in once the account is in place.

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Replying to mr. mischief:
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By jon dickinson
20th Feb 2019 10:12

Hi

The reason why £500 is "all I am up for" is I fear the weakness and upcoming recession in your beloved EU will drag the UK economy down with it. If not for this I would have had no problem going for £5k!
Signed

An uneducated Brexiteer Numpty

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Replying to mr. mischief:
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By Donald MacKenzie
19th Feb 2019 12:32

I don't bet or I would be happy to challenge your hope that the UK is in recession in nine months time.

We have seen employment, a good indicator of business confidence, rise since 2016. No stock market collapse, very few City jobs moving overseas, only a few numpties panic buying.

The apocalypse has not arrived. Embrace our Brexit future.

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Replying to Donald MacKenzie:
Chris M
By mr. mischief
19th Feb 2019 18:56

Without wishing my supply of bets to dry up the following facts are relevant:

1. Unemployment is a lag indicator.

2. Lead indicators such as construction starts and retail sales had a really bad fourth quarter.

3. The productivity gap is getting even worse. Wages are rising strongly, so is employment but output is going nowhere. Unless profits see a big squeeze then something has to give.

Obviously my view is that this shaky house of cards will come crashing down at some point in 2019. You pays your money and you makes your choice.

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Replying to mr. mischief:
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By tonyleigh
21st Feb 2019 14:30

Seems the majority on here, who know a thing or two about economics and running companies, disagree with you.

If you're as disrespectful to your leave-voting clients as you are to those on this forum, I suspect a few of them may leave you.

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By Ruth75
19th Feb 2019 12:06

I think there my be some disruption with Brexit in the short term, but nobody is talking about the risks of staying in Europe. The Eurozone has significant economic problems and if Italy needs bailing out there will be lots of pressure on EU members and taxpayers to step in. Plus Europe wants more federalism not less, I can't see that going down well with the British public.

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By Ian McTernan CTA
19th Feb 2019 12:29

Given that Italy is in recession, Germany pretty much so, world growth is slowing and trade wars threatening, whether there is a recession here by the end of 2019 isn't too much of a bet and has very little to do with Brexit. We've had a good few years of growth, looks likely we are due for a recession in any case. If we avoid one in the near term then clearly our economy is more robust than many think.

So those spouting about Brexit effects needs to take off their EU utopia tinted glasses and see what is really happening in the EU: protests, high unemployment, QE only just finished so economies will now drop, recession, never ending regulation stifling growth.

As for clients, not lost a single one over Brexit as we are mature enough to realise that people can hold strongly opposing views and yet still be friends and clients. By all means debate it with clients but be reasonable about it- after all, 99% of it is all conjecture and we won't really know what the full effect is until we're in it.

I'm more amused by the Labour party split after hearing nothing but how deeply divided the Tory party are from Laura at the BBC- how they must have frothed at the mouth on hearing that news when that particular bubble burst.

People who become ex-friends because of something like Brexit weren't really friends to start with. Your clients tend to be a reflection of you- mine are made of sterner stuff.

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Chris M
By mr. mischief
19th Feb 2019 16:37

Blooming heck, Project Little England is alive and well around here. I'm amazed accountants - who are supposedly hard-headed financial type people - can still be in favour of this utter mess, with the most clueless Government we've had since before World War 2 blundering around.

Brexit as it was advertisied in the debates is a busted flush. When your flush is busted you have 2 choices. The sensible one is to chuck it in the muck and wait for the next hand. If you are SUPER confident of your player reading skills you can put a big bet in and bluff your busted flush, but even then that is a high risk strategy.

That's all very well in a poker tournament but it's no way to run a country.

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Replying to mr. mischief:
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By Rammstein1
20th Feb 2019 07:30

Yawn, remainer, yawn, bet, bet, bet, yawn, sore loser, yawn.

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By nicdell
20th Feb 2019 08:41

". . . the most clueless Government we've had since before World War 2 . . . "

That's quite a claim. The periods that I have lived through since the second world war which I'd say were worse - and in some cases far worse- were:

- Churchill's last administration
- The dying months of MacMillan's government
- Eden and Suez
- Douglas-Home - anyone remember him?
- Heath, losing to the miners and the three day week
- Wilson, rocketing inflation
- 'Crisis, what crisis' Callaghan and the IMF bailout
- Major and Brown at their nadir

I'm not sure that this proves anything except possibly nil desperandum.

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Replying to nicdell:
Chris M
By mr. mischief
20th Feb 2019 11:21

My basis for that statement is that the basic task of a government is to govern i.e. take decisions. In all those other cases decisions were being taken, albeit the wrong ones in many cases.

This Government had one job and has pretty much ignored everything else that most governments do. Yet they've still totally mucked up that one job.

Containers are now leaving our shores for the Far East and will arrive there after 29th March. The companies shipping the goods don't know what regulatory and tariff regime awaits them when those goods arrive.

In the words of the NFU president, on a No Deal Brexit our upland farmers immediately lose access to markets for 4 and a half million lambs. Most farmers voted Brexit and have been utterly sold down the river whatever happens from here on in.

The last time I felt this badly let down by a Government was the day we invaded Iraq as George W Bush's little poodle. That did not end well and I don't expect this to either.

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Replying to mr. mischief:
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By nicdell
20th Feb 2019 12:00

It's always good to see a reasoned argument backed up with supporting facts. That is the way to persuade and influence.

There can be no doubt that there is a very strong economic case for remaining in the EU. However, those for whom economic arguments are paramount appear unable to accept that those with strong views on, for example, democracy, sovereignty and independence also have a valid case to make. And, of course, vice versa - those who advocate for sovereignty etc. cannot accept that economic concerns should trump what they see as their principled decision! Hence the great divide.

Unless arguing in opposition to a leave voter, remain supporters are nevertheless generally quite prepared to accept that the EU is not a perfect institution. And I would imagine that most leave voters, when not arguing with a remain voter, are apprehensive about the economic consequences.

Why not, then, withdraw article 50, consult with other EU member states to establish common ground on dissatisfactions and then spend, say, 5 years negotiating to try to change things. This should allow time for people to decide what is really important and, at the end of that 5 year period, hold another referendum either to confirm the original decision or agree that, either things weren't so bad after all or sufficient change had been achieved for people to be happy to remain. Rushing such an important decision would not appear a sensible thing to do.

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By johnjenkins
20th Feb 2019 18:10

Although I'm leaning towards your argument, the EU will never give up their main aim of having a Federal (or whatever you want to call it) Europe. All they had to do was allow countries to have a flexible approach to Immigration.
The most important thing of all is that those voting for leave know exactly what they are voting for and have the confidence to see it through. A lot that voted remain just voted because they didn't want to rock the boat. The referendum would have happened sooner or later anyway.
I would even dare to say that if there was a European vote in all countries as to the choice of changing the way the EU operate, the current commission would be out on their ears.

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By nicdell
21st Feb 2019 09:04

I think what you say goes to the heart of the matter. The EU has not covered itself in glory in negotiations with its member states. The promise to reform the CAP in return for Blair giving up part of the rebate still remains to be fulfilled. The provisions rejected by the French in their referendum were simply incorporated in the Lisbon Treaty, and so on.

Would it work if a formal structure were put in place so that:

1. The government consults all MPs (both leavers and remainers) to find out what they like and dislike about EU membership. Including both leavers and remainers might help them to see the other side of the argument and start healing the divisions in the country.

2. When identifying their objections they must also propose solutions. Specifics only will be accepted - it’s no good just saying “I want my country back. Solution: leave the EU”. They would be required to say in what ways they consider they have lost their country and how that loss can be remedied. And so on.

3. The five most important objections, together with the proposals for EU reforms that are to be sought, should then be listed in order of most frequently complained about.

4. Then the government legislates to:

- impose a legal obligation to spend the next five years negotiating with the EU (together with other dissatisfied EU member countries) to seek changes to remedy the five most important objections (step 1. to be extended to include consultations with those other dissatisfied countries);
- impose a legal obligation leave the EU if, after one year, it is clear that the EU will not enter into serious negotiations;
- impose a legal obligation to publish at the end of the five year period a summary of the progress made during the five years towards achieving the reforms agreed to be necessary;
- make a legally binding commitment for the government to hold another referendum at the end of the five year period, using exactly the same questions as last time;
- withdraw article 50 to allow time for the above process.

Might this provide a practical solution, which could appeal to both sides? It is not just a second referendum, dressed up. There are clearly arguments for and against membership of the EU and if the arguments against can be resolved satisfactorily, most leavers might be happy to remain and to take the benefits of membership of a trade organisation. If the arguments against membership cannot be resolved after a serious attempt to find solutions, then the option to finally pull out of the EU could be taken. This would be at a time when:

- we know the practical issues involved in leaving the EU and can have prepared for them well in advance;
- the negotiations will have demonstrated the downside of remaining under the present structures and the advantages of remaining under reformed structures;
- the obduracy or flexibility of the EU in the face of the concerns of the UK and other member States will have been clearly demonstrated.

Following this process would result in our being seen as a prime mover in the EU rather than as a victim and it should also act to bring our divided country back together.

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By johnjenkins
21st Feb 2019 10:06

The problem with reforming something like the EU is that over many years it's gone further into Federalism (or whatever). To now try to say we don't like that so we think this should happen could negate something that is of benefit.
My view is that we go back to EFTA and say right what do we really want and can that be achieved. To tinker now wouldn't solve anything (a bit like our tax system). If the commission aren't prepared to change then there are only two solutions, stay or leave. Although I'm a very compromising person I do not see any middle way.
The other problem is that if we do leave without a meaningful deal I see the end of the EU, because I'm sure others will follow.

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By nicdell
21st Feb 2019 10:36

As you say,
"If the commission aren't prepared to change then there are only two solutions, stay or leave. "
That, I think, is the position in a nutshell. Their flexibility or intransigence needs to be established immediately (hence the 'one year, no change, leave' proposal) and, given the referendum result, the only advantage of the one year delay before leaving proposal would be a chance for both sides to come together and work towards as successful withdrawal as possible if remaining after reform is not an option. Pie in the sky?

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By Peter Cane
21st Feb 2019 10:12

If it were just a common market as they said in the 1970s, then yes I'd stay, but it isn't.

If it were just a free trade association, then yes I'd stay, but it isn't.

It's all about federal and political union, with our country governed mostly by unelected bureaucrats. That's one of the main reasons why I voted Brexit and still would. The EU acts just like a dictator, always demanding its own way and the Brexit negotiations have done nothing to dispel that view in the minds of many people in the UK (and elsewhere in Europe for that matter!).

If it were just a common market and free trade association, there wouldn't be such a kerfuffle about anyone leaving or joining.

Artificial federations don't last long and soon end in instability and even war, witness what happened in Yugoslavia and the Balkans 20 years or so ago. I fear the same could happen across Europe in the coming years, with the rise of far right and far left extremism in many countries.

I certainly would object strongly to the creation of a European police force and/or military. I see no benefit for our society.

There are already rumblings of a recession looming in Europe and beyond, nothing to do with Brexit, but whether we stay or go, that recession will affect us and our economy.

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By nicdell
21st Feb 2019 10:32

There's no doubt the country has got itself into a situation that is disagreeable to a majority of people. Nevertheless, it is to the advantage of us all if we can resolve matters with the least harm to our unity and social harmony and to our economy and standing in the world. As above, pie in the sky??!

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Replying to mr. mischief:
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By Peter Cane
20th Feb 2019 11:38

Mr Mischief, Your arguments would be more persuasive if you didn't keep resorting to insults against anyone who may have a different political opinion from yourself.

I voted for Brexit in 2016 and will be happy to do so again if the "Peoples vote" brigade get their wish and a second referendum takes place.

Like the majority of people who voted Brexit, I did not do so based on the misinformation during the referendum campaign (from both sides!), but on my own personal beliefs and experience of living in an EU controlled society.

My parents firmly believed that they were misled by the pro european campaign in the 1970s referendum and would never have voted to stay in the EU if they had known then what would happen, with all the ever closer federal and political union that has ruined our country.

This is not about "Little Englanders" and I get fed up with the constant sniping from remainers insinuating that all Brexiteers must be xenophobic racists.

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By jon dickinson
20th Feb 2019 11:44

Blooming heck, Project Little England is alive and well around here
Eh? I'm from Belfast:-) The real gamble is staying in a corrupt undemocratic outdated behemoth which wastes our money on vanity projects and trying to hold onto an unsustainable euro project. There is a whole world beyond the EU you know!

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Chris M
By mr. mischief
20th Feb 2019 13:20

Project Little England.

All my friends with Irish ancestry have applied for an Irish passport for them and their children.

Surely no-one questions that Scottish independence is now much more likely? After all, Gordon Brown only saved the day last time at the last minute by emphasising that a vote to stay in the UK was also a vote to stay in the EU.

Northern Ireland is a total shambles due to the back stop fiasco. The demographics there are that a Catholic majority is likely in the next few years, so given the country more or less always votes along religious lines if there is a referendum to rejoin Ireland it makes sense to go and rejoin the EU by that route.

I don't say these are at present likely scenarios, merely that Brexit has made both of them live issues. I am Scottish but would have voted to stay back then, but would now vote to leave Little England if a hard Brexit goes through.

Once May goes, it looks like our possible PM next time around will either be a raving Brexiteer numpty or an antisemitic terrorist sympathiser. Very grim.

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By jon dickinson
20th Feb 2019 14:11

Mr Mischief
As you are from Scotland and not N.Ireland I will forgive your ignorance on a "Border poll". While 100% of the Protestant population firmly want to remain British at least 50% of the Catholic population do also. The last poll we had to remain in the UK had a 98% majority. Please do not introduce politics into an accountancy forum! You appear to know even less about politics than you do economics.
Signed a Raving Brexiteer numpty:-)

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By nicdell
20th Feb 2019 14:12

It would be a great shame to see the break-up of the Union. It always seems to me to be the perfect combination of Scottish brain, English strength, Welsh heart and Irish joie de vivre (none of which characteristics is exclusive to any one of the nations, of course). That said, as we can see from the above assessment, we are very different peoples and without the accident of physical proximity would never have joined together as a single nation. If it no longer suits us all (or individual nations) to remain as a single country, it would be foolish to prolong the Union for sentimental reasons. In the event, hard-nosed economic and administrative considerations might militate in favour of its preservation but who knows - hard-nosed economics is failing to persuade many to remain part of the EU and it may fail to persuade many in Scotland to remain part of the UK.

Thanks (1)